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View Full Version : 'Colossus' (new) and a few older ones...


roy-p
02-07-2014, 01:25 PM
Hi, dear acrylic people :wave:

Thank you for having me! Here are a few of my latest to older acrylics. Always a great joy and an humbling experience to share with you :)


WARNING: There's a nude human figure study (no. 4) at the bottom, please scroll accordingly.


1. Colossus - 30" x 36", acrylics on canvas.

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-egc9zcS_ZoU/UvUA5mnoluI/AAAAAAAABsk/BWuhjneyW3g/s1600/colossus800-jan14.jpg

Close up...

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-4fzhncAVOSQ/UvUA5rcieWI/AAAAAAAABsg/IxEA8I6Tyw0/s1600/colossusCropped-jan14.jpg



2. Studying horses... 22" x 30" (full sheet) acrylic on paper. Ref image by kind courtesy of Molly Goossens

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ZIXdFGhU3Tk/UvUA_oVTEjI/AAAAAAAABs4/GGfNPAm9sFU/s1600/horse-acry-oct13800.jpg

Close up...

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-w-SaoThu9PI/UvUBCALicfI/AAAAAAAABtA/Do9ePRIi5BE/s1600/horse-acry-oct13CU.jpg



3. Mr Woofie-doofie! - 11" x 13.5", a little acrylic exercise on paper. Ref image by kind courtesy of Claudia Dermois

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-kZ5ANLx_ssM/UvUA88HG3mI/AAAAAAAABsw/gxm18_eoylM/s1600/germanshepherd-nov13800.jpg



Lastly...

4. Figure study - 22" x 15", acrylic on paper. This was directly painted onto paper with brush - I find this a more relaxed way to paint, although its not something I frequently do. Ref image by kind courtesy of Rens (Rens102 at deviantart.com)

*** Larger version (1352 x 1600 px) is linked here (http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Qw2Y_q9mrX8/Uola-FyUZUI/AAAAAAAABqc/JQZlkeSIoHc/s1600/acry-fig-nov13-bb.jpg).

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-dbIdHoGrdfE/UvUA1vfmhuI/AAAAAAAABsY/Kzm4zd5LIck/s1600/acry-fig-nov13-bb800.jpg



Thank you so much for looking!! :)

AprilJoy
02-07-2014, 01:55 PM
All lovely, skillful pieces, Prosenjit. The little details are fantastic and your "painterly" brushstrokes that are mixed in complete the images wonderfully.
Imo- well done, I enjoyed each of these.

Charlie's Mum
02-07-2014, 02:32 PM
:wave: Hi and welcome back Prosenjit - you're such a GOOD painter you really should be here more often - I miss your work!
These are all superb pieces - studies or finished works :thumbsup:

Keri Howie
02-07-2014, 03:40 PM
Fantastic work. Such vibrant wildlife is seldom seen. Thanks for sharing!

Margaret 59
02-07-2014, 05:30 PM
Masterful work on all of these.

Fox_eNova
02-07-2014, 06:54 PM
Masterful is right. The animals eyes are so intent and captivating. WELL DONE!

pastel65
02-07-2014, 07:09 PM
All outstanding! Pam:wave:

susme48
02-07-2014, 07:39 PM
Prosenjit...so good to see your work again!! So good!! They are all great, but wow to the Colossus and the horse...just wow!! :)

Dcam
02-07-2014, 10:04 PM
These are really beautifully rendered. My favorite is that powerful colossus.
Super acrylic work.

Derek

roy-p
02-08-2014, 06:09 AM
Thank you very much... April, Maureen :wave:, Keri, Margaret, Eric, Pam, Susan AND Derek! :) That was so inspiring...

April - I'm so glad you mentioned the mix of the detail with the broader brush-strokes!

Maureen - you know why Acrylics is such a warm place even in winter? Its not only because of the colors, but also because of Warmhearts like you :) Which makes it all the more special, every time I log in to post or browse. Thank you my friend.

Keri - that's a really inspiring thing to say. Fact is, I've started to enjoy drawing/painting animals more, only after I've had a go at trying to teach myself the human figure. There is this fascinating uniformity of design in nature!

Margaret - I'm so humbled :)

Eric - no wonder its said that eyes are window to the 'soul' - whatever the latter means, eyes sure are a powerful way to communicate. I just try to be mindful of this when drawing/painting.

Hi Pam, many thanks :wave:

Susan - and its so very good to be here amongst all the warm-hearted, talented people :) I'm glad you like Colossus.

Derek - heyy, so kind of you to drop in :) I'm really enthused that you used the word 'powerful' in relation to Colossus, something I could unquestionably sense when standing in front of that animal in real life.

Also, my gratitude to all those who've been looking in...

ItsaWonder
02-08-2014, 09:33 AM
And my gratitude to you, for showing us your amazing acrylic work. You have such a command of the medium, it's quite admirable--your use of color, brushstroke, not to mention drawing, etc. etc. Don't need to list all the elements of art here, but I just wanted to convey I think you've got it all going on! And on top of all that, you seem to have a fantastic technique for photographing your art, which is my bugaboo, so if you have any tips, I am all ears...

Thanks...Meredith

roy-p
02-09-2014, 04:16 AM
Meredith, that is totally kind of you... and will inspire me to work hard(er). I'd love to paint more, to use up every available hours, but in the 'real' world, that is not possible. Plus, the brain can clog up pretty fast, affecting my performance edge.

Thank you for appreciating my photography. Truth is, even though I'm fastidious about getting as close a representation to the original as possible, my low-end equipment will not always permit me to do that, so I have to do some post-processing. However, the basic steps that I follow are enumerated below, perhaps they'll be of some help to you...

Most of my earlier pics were taken with a Sony pocket digital, and now with a low-cost Nikon point and shoot (L820).

1. To keep the pic free from lens distortion (bending at the corners/edges) - I focus from mid-distance, so that a part of the room is visible around the pic. Then I zoom in to the pic only, which cuts out the distortion that happens at wider angles.

2. I'm mindful of the white balance (WB), which is how the camera interprets the 'color' of the available light in the room - If I were to take a picture in early morning or late afternoon sunlight, it'd have an orang-ish tint to it. A similar tint would appear if taken in incandescent (old type bulbs) lights. If taken in a fluorescent light, the pic would have a bluish tint. Therefore, the camera would have to ignore the tint or cast in the light, and make whites appear as white as possible, which would best represent the other colors as well.

So, I tend to use a preset WB, a feature available in most consumer level cameras, by photographing a white sheet in the light which I'd use to photograph my art work. The camera uses that as reference for white and adjusts its tint accordingly. Normally, my light is an ordinary fluorescent tube light, coming down at an angle, with the picture rotated about 50-60 degs towards the light. Hence, this is the light I'd use to photograph that white sheet to adjust my present WB. Please read this article I found (http://www.wikihow.com/Adjust-Your-Digital-Camera%27s-White-Balance) - I think this explains it succinctly enough, with good illustrations.

Also, I keep the exposure level down a notch or two say -0.3 or -0.7 even. This helps keep the subtler tones from being washed out in light.

3. Post processing in a good imaging software - you may use Gimp, which is a freeware, or the expensive commercial ones. If you want, you may kindly google these relevant issues for related tutorials. I keep looking back and forth from my monitor to the actual art work and do a visual estimate for comparison.

a. Check for levels i.e. extremes of darkness or lightness. The lights should'nt be too bright, and the darks (unless its an absolute black) should still have features visible in it.

b. Check for light decay across the pic - which is bound to happen since the light is unidirectional. You may correct this by using a 'gradient selector' (which selects a wide area of the canvas in a graded, or 'feathered' manner). Once selected, you may brighten the selected area to match the illumination on the other side. All these are subtle steps, needless to say.

c. Correct Color balance i.e. tints which may be there due to less than perfect white balance control. For example, if its too bluish, drag that slider in the other direction. Sometimes you may have to do this across the three 'spectra' - highlight, mid tone and shadows. Most often, adjusting for the mid tones would suffice.

d. Once you're satisfied by visual estimation, you may add just a little sharpness (overdoing this will ruin your picture, making it harsh) to compensate for its loss in the entire process of digitizing.

But, and this is most important, unless your monitor is relatively well calibrated (that is, is not too dark or too bright, and doesn't have a significant color cast) all your effort will be useless. If our 'eyes' are yellow, the world will appear yellow! I use a REALLY old, cathode ray monitor - (13 years old!) - which I calibrate a number of times per year, from instructions freely available on the internet ('how to calibrate my monitor').

I have no way to check how my pic will appear on my viewers' monitors (although you may check your website on a number of your friends' monitors), so all this is really a best guess using widely used techniques. On that note, I visited your website and checked out the beautiful paintings (was particularly impressed by 'boy chasing duck') - the colors look quite apt to me, although, having seen the originals you're the best judge of course. If you're dissatisfied with your pics, maybe its your own monitor which needs some calibration-loving... and it'd perhaps also help to re-check those pics across a number of friends/relatives' monitors to get a better appreciation?

Hopefully, some of that babble above will be of help to you. And oh, thank you for teaching me that lovely word 'bugaboo' :D

beegirl
02-09-2014, 05:30 PM
wonderful! so much talent!

ItsaWonder
02-09-2014, 07:54 PM
But, and this is most important, unless your monitor is relatively well calibrated (that is, is not too dark or too bright, and doesn't have a significant color cast) all your effort will be useless. If our 'eyes' are yellow, the world will appear yellow! I use a REALLY old, cathode ray monitor - (13 years old!) - which I calibrate a number of times per year, from instructions freely available on the internet ('how to calibrate my monitor').

I have no way to check how my pic will appear on my viewers' monitors (although you may check your website on a number of your friends' monitors), so all this is really a best guess using widely used techniques. On that note, I visited your website and checked out the beautiful paintings (was particularly impressed by 'boy chasing duck') - the colors look quite apt to me, although, having seen the originals you're the best judge of course. If you're dissatisfied with your pics, maybe its your own monitor which needs some calibration-loving... and it'd perhaps also help to re-check those pics across a number of friends/relatives' monitors to get a better appreciation?

Hopefully, some of that babble above will be of help to you. And oh, thank you for teaching me that lovely word 'bugaboo' :D

Wow, thanks for the lesson, I really appreciate your help. What do you like to be called here for your name? Your signature at the bottom of your posts is the opposite of your user name above.

You are a very good teacher, and I will be going through your lesson here thoroughly. So far, scans have worked best for on-line images of my work, but then when I take to the print shop, they don't look the same. Thankfully, the print shop just got a flat-bed scanner, so we are seeing how that works for my paintings. But I really would like to learn how to do this effectively for myself.

I am thinking that if I don't know if my monitor is calibrated, it must not be? Something I will look into.

"Bugaboo" is not original to me, trying to remember where I heard it...I'm thinking from Robert Genn. I do love that word, and sometimes it fits better than any other way of expressing myself!

Looking forward to seeing more of your work, and thanks again for showing it and for the lesson...(and for complimenting my work, much appreciated).

Meredith

bhavani.krishnan
02-09-2014, 10:13 PM
Stunning work! My favorite would be the horse (due to my bias to the subject) but all are extremely well done. Thanks also for your tips on photographing artwork.

roy-p
02-10-2014, 02:48 AM
Hello Tai, that is so kind of you. Many thanks, and :wave: to your first baby girl :D

Meredith... heyyy, welcome back! My first name is Prosenjit (Pro-sen-jit) and Roy is my surname (I know that Roy is not an uncommon first name in your neck of the woods :)) Thank you for appreciating my 'teaching/babbling' :P Yes, scanning, when properly done is probably the best way to digitize a work. I used to do that extensively for my smaller, A4 works until my scanner puttered out. For larger works, camera is obviously the easier option.

Bhavani - Hi :wave: You're very welcome @ liking my photography write-up. I'd love to paint more horses as well... in fact, 'de-coding' horse anatomy gives me a clearer grasp on human anatomy, if that makes any sense at all. Thank you!

ColinS
02-10-2014, 03:01 AM
These are all stunningly well done. The Colossus is particularly outstanding, with its sense of realistic immediacy; but I also think the Figure Study is very powerful.

Good pointers on the photography too. Very kind of you to share so much knowledge to help answer a question.

As for "Bugaboos" we have a whole mountain range of that name in British Columbia. :D

idylbrush
02-10-2014, 07:00 AM
Well done, IMHO. I have become quite fond of the first work. It has captured the essence of the animal so well. I keep coming back to look at them all so it has my attention.

cem
02-10-2014, 08:27 AM
All very masterfully done. Wow! Enjoying them all!

LavenderFrost
02-10-2014, 12:47 PM
Very good work!

doctoring in arts
02-10-2014, 01:09 PM
amazing works... I really love the colossus...

roy-p
02-11-2014, 10:21 AM
Thank you so much - Colin, HLC, Cindy, Michelle and Subi, your kindness is sincerely appreciated :)

Colin - Wow @ Bugaboos being a mountain range (as well), who would've thought! And here I learned the word just a couple of days ago. Bless the internet :D thank you so much for also liking the figure... I was happy with its dual light scheme.

HLC - I'm really glad that looking past the technical stuff, you could connect with the essence of the portrayed. That really completes the communication :)

Cindy - faaa...r from masterly :) But I'm sincerely humbled that you think so.

Michelle - thanks a lot!

Subi - I'm thankful that you favor the Colossus, this gorgeous beast was truly impressive when I came across him one afternoon. We were far from the sea, but I thought 'transporting' him to this location would somehow add to its deeper appeal :)

Thanks also to all those who continue to visit these pages...