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opainter
12-19-2013, 11:46 PM
I prefer to lay out the same colors on my palette. Even though I like to experiment with different colors, I try to be consistent about using the same colors. This helps me learn the handling characteristics and mixing properties of individual colors.

I became interested in discovering a set of ten or so colors that would be useful for painting landscape and botanical subjects. I chose ten as the number because most artists (except watercolorists!) will use ten or fewer colors at any given time (in any given painting).

My palette is grouped into cool colors (colors 1-3, on the left), browns (colors 4-6, in the center), and warm colors (colors 7-9, on the right), as well as white, which can go either on the far right or below the other colors.

You will notice that I don't include phthalo blue or green. This is because the phthalos are notoriously difficult to "lift" (or "tint") toward white, and there exist perfectly-suitable (and substitutable) alternatives.

If you count Cobalt Turquoise as a blue, my palette includes three blues. If you count Yellow Ochre as a yellow, my palette includes three yellows. This lets me mix pretty much whatever green I want. As you can see, I prefer to mix not only my greens, but my oranges and purples as well.
Cobalt Turquois (PB 36) ........ G (Price Series 8) ... 197
Anthraquinone Blue (PB 60) ..... G (Price Series 7) ... 226
Ultramarine Blue (PB 29) ....... G (Price Series 2) ... 227
Red Oxide (PR 101) ............. G (Price Series 1) ... 007
Raw Umber (PBr 7) .............. G (Price Series 1) ... 039
Yellow Ochre (PY 43) ........... G (Price Series 1) ... 042
Perylene Red (PR 149) .......... W (Price Series 4) ... 358
Indian Yellow (PY 139) ......... L (Price Series 2) ... 042
Cadmium Yellow Light (PY 35) ... G (Price Series 7) ... 060
Titanium White (PW 6) .......... G (Price Series 1)
G = Golden Paint's "Heavy Body" line
L = Liquitex's "Heavy Body" line
W = Winsor & Newton's "Artist's Acrylic" lineMy palette of colors is subject to change at any time, but given the effort I have put into selecting it, it probably won't!

opainter
12-20-2013, 12:01 AM
I didn't post this in the "Show us your palette colors ..." sticky thread because I already have an older post there, and because I wanted to give room for people to respond to this thread as much as they want.

Anyway, C & C are welcome! I'd be glad to discuss my color choices and their alternatives! :thumbsup:

jaka44
12-20-2013, 04:40 AM
What do you mean by "lift" toward white? Do you mean that they are too strong and overpower the mixture?

Gigalot
12-20-2013, 06:34 AM
What do you mean by "lift" toward white? Do you mean that they are too strong and overpower the mixture?

"Lifting colour entails sponging water colour from a surface. It can include anything from a complete wash down under running water, to getting a "smoky" background, to the sponging out of a small area in order to lighten or rescue it.

Bad lifting properties just means that you can't remove absorbed pigment completely and clean painting surface using water, solvent, rag or somewhat else. For example, Titanium white paint remains as a chalky trace....

jaka44
12-20-2013, 01:28 PM
"Lifting colour entails sponging water colour from a surface. It can include anything from a complete wash down under running water, to getting a "smoky" background, to the sponging out of a small area in order to lighten or rescue it.

Bad lifting properties just means that you can't remove absorbed pigment completely and clean painting surface using water, solvent, rag or somewhat else. For example, Titanium white paint remains as a chalky trace....

I can understand that for watercolor, but opainter is saying this is an acrylic palette.

Gigalot
12-20-2013, 06:34 PM
I can understand that for watercolor, but opainter is saying this is an acrylic palette.

I have the same (or equal) effect in oil paint, particularly with Titanium white. Some people call it "chalking". As Opainter said about Phthalo and Titanium pigment troubles, probably, he meant something like "lifting disadvantages".

opainter
12-21-2013, 01:24 AM
By "lift" I just meant "tint," although now I can see that the term probably refers to physically lifting the paint. (Time for me to consult an art dictionary!)

opainter
12-22-2013, 04:05 AM
My palette is grouped into cool colors (colors 1-3, on the left), browns (colors 4-6, in the center), and warm colors (colors 7-9, on the right), as well as white, which can go either on the far right or below the other colors.


Cobalt Turquois (PB 36) ........ G (Price Series 8) ... 197
Anthraquinone Blue (PB 60) ..... G (Price Series 7) ... 226
Ultramarine Blue (PB 29) ....... G (Price Series 2) ... 227
Red Oxide (PR 101) ............. G (Price Series 1) ... 007
Raw Umber (PBr 7) .............. G (Price Series 1) ... 039
Yellow Ochre (PY 43) ........... G (Price Series 1) ... 042
Perylene Red (PR 149) .......... W (Price Series 4) ... 358
Indian Yellow (PY 139) ......... L (Price Series 2) ... 042
Cadmium Yellow Light (PY 35) ... G (Price Series 7) ... 060
Titanium White (PW 6) .......... G (Price Series 1)
G = Golden Paint's "Heavy Body" line
L = Liquitex's "Heavy Body" line
W = Winsor & Newton's "Artist's Acrylic" line

Sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words. Here is what this palette might look like:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Dec-2013/983189-My_Current_Acrylic_Palette.jpg

Gigalot
12-22-2013, 05:20 AM
It seems to be very useful palette. In oil I don't have Indantrene Blue, it is rare paint here. I guess, my cheap genuine Prussian Blue can be close in color.

When I need to make "color composition". I always use Quinacridone Red PR209; Quinacridone Magenta; Phthalo Green PG7; Phthalo Blue PB15:3. I always love these colors. Nothing can be better for me. Absolutely delicious, pure and powerful pigments. They can be even brighter and pure in acrylic colours, because acrylic binder is clean and colorless. Love them all! Also, Opaque Cadmium reds are also a good complement to transparent Quins.
Creamy and powerful. Sky, leaves and flowers color soul! :clap:
My troubles with powerful paints are in the past and are now only in my memories. An experience can make everything useful. Just enjoy, how gorgeous those pigments are!


I think, I need also Dioxazine Purple PV23 to mix brightest and very opaque violet with pure Titanium white. Other violets just dilute Titanium in mixture and resulting color is not as opaque as I need. I can reach only half hiding power while I need full power of Titanium White. At once, I tried Diox+Titanium combination and that was really perfect in term of opacity!

opainter
12-23-2013, 12:27 AM
In oil I don't have Indantrene Blue, it is rare paint here. I guess, my cheap genuine Prussian Blue can be close in color.

You can get a good approximation of Indanthrene/Anthraquinone Blue by mixing Prussian Blue and Ultramarine Blue. These colors are adjacent to each other on Golden's Virtual Paint Mixer.

When I need to make "color composition". I always use Quinacridone Red PR209; Quinacridone Magenta; Phthalo Green PG7; Phthalo Blue PB15:3. I always love these colors. Nothing can be better for me. Absolutely delicious, pure and powerful pigments. They can be even brighter and pure in acrylic colours, because acrylic binder is clean and colorless. Love them all!

These colors seem like they would be a bit too strong for most landscapes, but they are great colors for certain botanical subjects (bright red flowers, for example!) and abstracts.

I think, I need also Dioxazine Purple PV23 to mix brightest and very opaque violet with pure Titanium white.

A split-primary (two reds) color palette is necessary for mixing the best and brightest oranges and purples, and my palette only has a single red. If I have to have a higher-chroma purple or orange than my palette allows, I'll have to add another color as a temporary guest color for the duration of my painting. I can't think of a better purple to use to produce high-chroma mixes (including tints) than Dioxazine Purple.

According to Golden, their Dioxazine Purple has a lightfastness rating of II (Very Good), and I prefer a lightfastness rating of I (Excellent). Are there any other high-chroma purples with a lightfastness rating of I that you know of?

Gigalot
12-23-2013, 12:15 PM
[QUOTE=opainter
According to Golden, their Dioxazine Purple has a lightfastness rating of II (Very Good), and I prefer a lightfastness rating of I (Excellent). Are there any other high-chroma purples with a lightfastness rating of I that you know of?[/QUOTE]

Manganese violet, Ultramarine violet and Cobalt violet in oil, Ultramarine violet in acrylic. They are low tinters, and actually, can't replace Dioxazine purple in very opaque and bright mixtures with titanium white. Dioxazine is an irreplaceble pigment. :crying: I have three different violets, more than lightfast, just "rock solid" paints, but I can't do what I want using those pigments. Ultra-opaque violet with bright, chromatic color and with high hidding power.

My main strategy to create general purpose palette is to have each color in one opaque and one transpaent form. My palette is eight colors CMYK +RGB +White. Using two paints for each color you will have sixteen paint tubes + six tubes of different Earth pigments. Twenty two paint tubes totally. And you can perform any task with it, from very dull asphaltum Baroque, extremaly mud landscapes and portraits and colorful contemporary Fauvism, Impressionism, Avant-Garde art. Sadly, I do not have opaque magenta and purple.