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View Full Version : Which Pan Pastel colors to get? Any deals?


mkilci
12-01-2013, 04:31 PM
Hi everyone. I would like to try the Pan Pastels. I like to try portraits and some landscapes. What colors/sets should I get? Is it better/cheaper to get the 80 color set? Any Black friday deals anyone having?

Thanks in advance..

Murat

robertsloan2
12-01-2013, 08:58 PM
The best, cheapest way to get Pan Pastels, is by sets. 80 color set is by a margin of a few cents per color, the very best bargain. Next best are the Painters Sets. I have the full range but I got the 10 color trays and put together a plein air set of 10 Painters plus 5 Tints Set and 5 Deep Darks set. Just the 10 Painters is enough really, sometimes I just carry that.

5 Painters as a starter is all right - it's like getting a primaries and black and white set, they're good mixers. I prefer the 10 Painters though because the secondaries and earths are very useful.

20 Painters gets you all the colors in pure mass tone - you can mix anything with those. Tints, Shades and Deep Dark Shades are convenience colors. I started with 20 Painters to see if I'd like them, then added the 20 color sets of Tints, Shades and when they came out, Deep Dark Shades.

Metallics are cheaper to get in sets than individual too, the 6 color Metallics is the best bargain.

So if you don't want to shell out for the full range, my recommendation is either 20 Painters to build up to it if you love them, or 10 Painters that can become a plein air set on its own. There are some specialty sets like landscape, ocean, some Donna Downey sets and so on. But for general use the Painters collections are the most balanced.

That and watch for when they're on sale.

I love my Pans. If you can get the full range set, it comes with trays and a lot of extras. The trays are extremely useful but the Pans are very compact just stacked. I didn't have the trays at first and so just spreading the stacks out as I needed them was good enough. Trays make setup easier. Transport just as a stack screwed together is fine.

Tools are cheapest in the mixed-bag set, where you can try them all out and find which ones you use most. You get the full variety with that. Everyone's different about which their favorite tool or knife is. I like the sponges more than knives but got all four knife shapes and extra socks because I didn't know that at first. The different shapes and sizes are all useful in different ways, they each give a different stroke.

Minimal expense for a full range of subjects, I'd say get a pack of mixed sponge shapes, one big oval for blocking in and the 10 Painters set. 5 Painters is absolute minimal but you'll be glad to have the ochre, brown, violet, green and burnt sienna. Especially in landscapes, Violet is essential, while in portraits I've found Sienna to be essential to almost any complexion.

mkilci
12-02-2013, 09:02 AM
Robert,

Thanks for taking the time and replying. Great info, exactly what I was looking for.

Heading to a local store today :clap:.

Murat

mkilci
12-02-2013, 10:21 AM
Robert, another question, what is the surface of your choice for Panpastels?

Thanks again
Murat

getdusty
12-02-2013, 12:07 PM
Murat, can I jump in on your thread with a question? I'm also interested in pans. Can you use a brush to apply them, like painting?

allydoodle
12-02-2013, 03:48 PM
Robert, another question, what is the surface of your choice for Panpastels?

Thanks again
Murat

I have heard that Pastelmat works especially well with Pan Pastels. The surface of that paper isn't abrasive like sanded surfaces, so it doesn't eat up the sponge applicators, and you can layer the colors. I have used Pans on Canson paper, but only as an underpainting. Not sure if I could get a finished result with them. On the sanded surfaces the sponges really get eaten up, and quickly, so I wouldn't recommend doing an entire painting using just the Pans. I've done underpaintings on sanded surfaces using them and it works well, but I don't do too much, just the underpainting. I've also heard that Canson Touch might be a good surface for the Pans, I remember someone (I think Derek, aka Dcam) using the pans on Canson Touch.....

allydoodle
12-02-2013, 03:49 PM
Murat, can I jump in on your thread with a question? I'm also interested in pans. Can you use a brush to apply them, like painting?

I'm not sure you could really get much accomplished using regular brushes with Pan Pastels. I think the dust would fly rather than adhere. The sponge applicators that you can buy are really effective. They come in different sizes and shapes, some of which mimic a brush.

Chikaminx
12-06-2013, 10:51 PM
Just curious - has anyone tried using makeup sponges, applicators with Panpastels?! These pastels aren't common in Australia, just wondering if this is a good short-term solution for those times when applicators run out and the refills are in transit?!

robertsloan2
12-07-2013, 04:55 AM
Pastelmat is my favorite, along with the Mi-Tientes Touch which is very similar to Pastelmat. I have had some good success with them on Colourfix paper but the ClaireFontaine PastelMat got the best results. Also, I've had some good success on vellum finish drawing papers, just sketchbook use. Not like the layering I'd get on PastelMat but pretty good nonetheless, and on smooth side of Canson Mi-Tientes.

I have a personal technique of just using it as a sketch material, dip a dark color and make dark marks first, then wear off the color in the drawing doing medium and then light strokes to build up what I'm doing. That works great in sketchbooks. It also works well for a tonal first layer on good PastelMat when I really need to block in the painting before starting to layer more colors over it. Deep Dark shades are great for that.

Makeup sponges don't hold as much color and wear out much faster than the micropore Sofft tools. It's better to order those with the Pan Pastels even if makeup supplies are cheap.