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Dizzydogs
11-22-2013, 08:13 AM
Can someone tell me how to mix flesh colour?

It's something I have a real problem with.....both with watercolour and acrylics

I know you can buy flesh in acrylics but even that I dislike....

Know it's pretty basic but any help would be very welcome x:crossfingers: :crossfingers:

Journeyman
11-22-2013, 09:41 AM
To understand skin tones you have to understand skin to some extent. Flesh is reflective so it will reflect the colours that surround it. And because its translucent what underlies the skin will effect the colour, for example underlying the skin of the forehead are thin sheets of muscle that donít have a lot of blood so the skin in that area looks sallow, unlike the cheeks which have thick muscles with lots of blood and look ruddy. Also the nose and ears have a plentiful supply of blood and are usually flushed. So you will find that each area of the body has a different colour. Then we have to take into account the light and shadow that is defining the model.
That all sounds very complicated but itís worth keeping in mind as you paint.
The good news is that you can paint skin tones with a very limited palette, itís possible to paint a portrait with Burnt Sienna, black and white.
Anders Zorn was a famous portrait painter renowned for the limited palette he used. You can see his palette in this self portrait.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Nov-2013/95424-Anders_Zorn__SP.jpg

His palette was Vermilion, Yellow Ochre, Black and White. I usually use Raw Sienna rather than Yellow Ochre which is often to yellow.

Start with a limited palette and work up as you get used to mixing, :wave: Dave

Yorky
11-22-2013, 11:05 AM
If you check out the Watercolor Handbook link in my signature you will find information on flesh tones in watercolour. My go to is a mix of permanent rose and burnt sienna but I often add other colours for shadows and of course completely different choices for dark skins.

Doug

Patrick1
11-22-2013, 07:10 PM
As with all low-chroma colors, there are many ways to mix them...no right or wrong...go with whatever works best & easiest for you.

Earth tones work well, but my preferred base mix for skin tones is a violet-red (Alizarin Crimson or hue or Quin. Violet) + a lemon yellow or yellow-green, and lightened with white. Darkened/shadowed by adding less yellow and white, or by adding any blue. Subtle color nuances can be had by adding small amounts of any other color as needed.

rltromble
11-23-2013, 01:01 AM
Can someone tell me how to mix flesh colour?

It's something I have a real problem with.....both with watercolour and acrylics

I know you can buy flesh in acrylics but even that I dislike....

Know it's pretty basic but any help would be very welcome x:crossfingers: :crossfingers:
Skin tones are basically browns and low chroma pinks and browns are low chroma oranges. Hence red+yellow (orange) +plus its complement (blue)=brown. In the case of lighter skin tones there is a lot more white. The combinations are endless, really. You can use higher tinting colors like cad yellow, red, or cad orange, but I suggest using weaker colors. They are much easier to control. The earth colors are a good starting point. Yellow ocher +an earth red like red ocher + white will usually get you close to a generic skin tone and burnt umber will gray down the mixture.

opainter
11-24-2013, 02:09 AM
How you would mix flesh tones would depend of what colors paint you have to use. One thing you can do is plug some of your colors into a virtual paint mixer and see what results you can get. One that I like to use is Golden's virtual paint mixer (http://www.goldenpaints.com/products/mixer/). If you click on that link you will go there.

For example, let's say that you're mixing a Caucasian flesh tone in acrylics. And let's say that you have Red Oxide and Naples Yellow Hue (either from Golden's lines, or closely matching what they have). By playing around with the mixer, I discovered that a 2-to-1 ratio of Naples Yellow Hue to Red Oxide, along with lots of Titanium White, produces a pretty nice flesh tone.

maryinasia
11-24-2013, 05:41 AM
it's fun to pay attention to all the variations of colors, shades, values, in different parts of a person's face and hands and how the lighting affects everything

Yorky
11-24-2013, 05:49 AM
If you are working in watercolours check out the Watercolor handbook and Watercolor Demos links in my signature.

Doug

Cfralic
12-19-2013, 12:31 PM
I work in oils and I really enjoy using the 'radiant' line by Gamblin for rich undertones. My go- to is Flake White Replacement, yellow ochre, radiant magenta and radiant turquoise hue. I also might use some alizarin crimson to mix the basic sort of 'Caucasian flesh tone'.