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Mikey
09-19-2003, 09:37 AM
Regardless of who or what we are, we are artists. I don’t know the author of this quote "Art is struggle" on the basis of you can never find something when you want it. However, if I’m not mistaken, it does sound like Marxist dialectic. Certainly a lot of Art Historians will agree that Modern Art was born out of Socialist ideals, but please allow me to define my own terms. The fact of having put paint on canvas, model clay, or just making a living may be struggle enough for the artist, however, my reference is to the creative act. It is for me rather like a woman giving birth. A seed may gestate, growing somewhere just out of conscious reach until maturity whereupon an idea is born. It is something, which the true artist just cannot deny and will need to express whatever the cost. The labour may be easy, or possibly involve a lot of pain. We probably will not wish to look for suffering, but there is no doubt that many a creative person has been enriched thereby. We need only think of Rembrandt who produced his most sensitive work in sad, old age, or Monet, practically blind with new depths of inner vision.

Whatever the cost of creativity there seems to be a far sadder thing: is it not evading the issues bringing those things to birth. I have met people seemingly loaded with talent, yet they regard painting simply as a wonderful way to relaxation on one evening a week. Well, why not? They will tell me that they have responsibilities, or other interests. Yet shouldn’t we regard our vision, or talent as a responsibility? Then again, what can be said to these people? Surely passion is the catalyst which brings great things to birth.


Mikey

SanDL
09-19-2003, 06:57 PM
Yes, it is struggle.
It's good struggle. It's teeth cutting struggle. And sometimes it is relaxation.

I think I make art not so much to make art but to interface with my world. It is a means to an end. I'm trying to cope, learn, understand, have fun and most of all look at what's going down.
When I make a painting I'm saying to whoever has eyes to listen "hey, check this out!"

I may end up writing instead one of these days.

I don't make art for art's sake. It's just the vehicle that gets me around.

Mikey
09-19-2003, 09:52 PM
SanDL,

Thanks for joining me in this discussion.

Mikey

SanDL
09-19-2003, 10:28 PM
You're welcome. It is one of my most favorite subjects.

Maybe there is a temperament out there that feels yearning and searching all the time. I liken it to love sickness.

The amount of time we have all spent on this message board trying to put our finger on this ineffable thing called art, be it music, painting, poetry, prose whatever, is amazing.

I'm beginning to feel weary of its constant examination because it involves so much speaking and verbally thinking about it when I'd much rather feel it. Too much talking about it causes it's essence to slip away. At the same time I'm driven to think about it because it is my sanctuary from disappointment, pain, boredom. Can I make my art fantasies so perfect that the world inside my head becomes more interesting than the world around me? No. That would be solipsistic.

The outside feeds the inside and vice versa.

(deep sigh)

Mikey
09-19-2003, 10:38 PM
SanDL

I've got you. I'm a day dreamer and always have been, yet I know that this doesn't help me get on with real life where the real rewards are.

Mikey

dd50
09-20-2003, 10:27 AM
Mikey,

I'm not sure what the whole discussion here is about, but I DO know that I've been struggling greatly with the effort of art vs natural talent. It's a struggle that goes inside my head constantly!

I also hear ya on being a daydreamer ... me too! :D
It can be good (imagination/originality/ideas) and it can be bad (procrastinating/being frozen).

And what SanDL said about spending so much time here in the forum ... searching, researching, trying to struggle with all these questions and issues ... must mean SOMETHING, must say something about us as artists ... or even 'being' artists.

Hugs,
Dee

Mikey
09-20-2003, 10:47 AM
Hi Dee,

One of my serious moments. Thanks for joining in.

I'm thinking in some ways we are what we are and that's it. We are creatives. I think my real point is about how much to be want to create and how passionate are we about it. From what I've seen of your posts I'd say you're doing pretty good so far.

Mikey

Keith Russell
09-21-2003, 10:08 PM
Didn't someone say that the only thing harder than (or, perhaps it was 'worse than') creating, is not creating?

I agree...

K

lascauxcaveman
09-22-2003, 02:41 AM
... and getting older sucks, but it sure beats the alternative.
:)

To me, art is easy. If it ain't easy, it ain't art. Its something else. Work or something. maybe craftsmanship. To become and work as an able craftsman can be very hard, that I'll go along with.

I guess I don't know from passion, but I don't see what it has much to do with art; except as applied to a painting or other work of art on the subject of passion, or meant to convey or evoke passion. There are whole realms of art that have absolutley nothing to do with passion.

I get a little introspective from time to time myself, but try not to get too much into all the the cliched flapdoodle about the tortured artist. If you are an artist, you'll always have something to do or say in artistic way, unless you are completely isolated from all stimuli. How could you not? There is a world out there to inspire and provoke you. Go for a walk, look ou the window, or turn on the radio. Anything.

Mikey
09-22-2003, 04:13 AM
Originally posted by lascauxcaveman
... and getting older sucks, but it sure beats the alternative.
:)

To me, art is easy. If it ain't easy, it ain't art. Its something else. Work or something. maybe craftsmanship. To become and work as an able craftsman can be very hard, that I'll go along with.


Caveman
I like these discussions because I feel we can get new ideas and explore thoughts. It is one way of moving forward.

I've had a quick rethink: art is as easy, or as difficult as life itself. Some people seem to sail through life, others have difficulties. In one way I tend to create difficulty for myself, because I'm an overachiever. Probably that applies to the craft side of things.

It's an obvious thing that we are all individuals. I can be consistent with the craft of painting, improving as I continue. I think I've said that the hard work, with the occassional bit of pain comes with the stretching and opening up of new areas.

I've spent a lot of my years cruising through life and my reflection on this gives me my present thoughts. If life is easy because we avoid issues, then we can never grow. I am really saying, work hard at training and the art comes easily, or at least it might if I stopped trying to overachieve. OK, some people are just loaded with talent and can't help it.

Mikey:)

Mikey
09-22-2003, 06:17 AM
Caveman,

I forgot the obvious, but this helps if you know where I'm coming from. The better we are with the craft side of things, the more able we are to find expression for our creativity. I am hoping that by painting the reality in front of my eyes and learning to see more of it I'll be able to come through to something new.

I have done abstracts in the past, but choose not to right now and don't seem to be inspired in that way. Again, all comments welcome.

The painting below was about addiction, inspired by seeing an alcoholic in London. It might have said so much about myself which was a bit frightening. I wasn't an addict.

Mikey

RobinZ
09-22-2003, 10:22 AM
For me, art is a struggle for me to move beyond what I can already do. I am sure it's no big insight to those who have been creating for years....as soon as you get to where you thought you wanted to go....you find you're not satisfied with it anymore!

So sometimes it's a struggle that leads to a new goal...and sometimes it's just a struggle, the kind that makes you want to throw your brushes against the wall and give up.

But it is an enjoyable struggle, one I like engaging in.

At least for me.

Mikey
09-22-2003, 10:39 AM
Originally posted by RobinZ
For me, art is a struggle for me to move beyond what I can already do.

So sometimes it's a struggle that leads to a new goal...and sometimes it's just a struggle, the kind that makes you want to throw your brushes against the wall and give up.

But it is an enjoyable struggle, one I like engaging in.

At least for me.

Absolutely Robin.

Mikey

erik_satie_rolls
09-22-2003, 01:58 PM
For me, making art is a total joy, and pain, and hard, and easy all at the same time.

It is AFTER the creative event that the real difficulty comes, and that is integrating what has been created, this act of mind, into the physical world: evaluating it, talking about it, presenting it, altering it, or trash-canning it. I think this is what Duchamp was dealing with when he retired from making art, and it is what some conceptual artists deal with.

And yet, for me, the created object is itself central to the whole issue, the hub around which all those other activities revolve. It would be so fantastic to just make the art and let someone else deal with it after that. I can't think of any better reason for wanting to be a 'success' lol.

Does anyone have any creative ways of dealing with the post-creative process? :)

dodger
09-22-2003, 03:30 PM
Good thread. :)

I think it's already been said that life itself is a struggle. Art, for me, is my way of making sense of life, of myself, of my inner struggles. Without the arts, it would be a pretty shallow world, superficial. No meaning. No growth.

My attempt to answer your question, Erik: for me, I analyse my work like I do my dreams. Sometimes, I write about it in my morning pages; other times, a poem is in order. And of course, this helps to feed your creative mind into the next piece. :)

Mikey
09-22-2003, 06:38 PM
Originally posted by Keith Russell
Didn't someone say that the only thing harder than (or, perhaps it was 'worse than') creating, is not creating?

I agree...

K

So succinct and true for most of us.

Mikey

raindreemer
09-22-2003, 11:33 PM
Originally posted by Mikey
Whatever the cost of creativity there seems to be a far sadder thing: is it not evading the issues bringing those things to birth. I have met people seemingly loaded with talent, yet they regard painting simply as a wonderful way to relaxation on one evening a week. Well, why not? They will tell me that they have responsibilities, or other interests. Yet shouldn’t we regard our vision, or talent as a responsibility? Then again, what can be said to these people? Surely passion is the catalyst which brings great things to birth.


Mikey

Hmm, I view things exactly the opposite. For me the "Real World" is my responsibility and my art, such as it is, is my salvation.

Its mine, it makes the real world go away and releases everything that inside of me, and if other people enjoy it thats wonderful but not necessary.

If I were to make it my responsibility, the passion would be lost.

As far as a struggle, right now I'm relearning everything after shutting out everything artistic for years, when I was younger and had those dreams of being an "ARTIST" the struggle was to do things "correctly".

I'm finding now that the struggle is only against myself, finding the means to let whats inside my head and heart out.

And each time I head a different direction with what I am doing, the struggle starts all over, and its a learning experience not only of what I can do but who I am. And undoubtedly my work now will change as I do.

Whether people think I'm an artist, a wannabe, or someone with a cute little hobby makes not a bit of diffence to me. When I get to sneak away from the world and spend time with my paint and brushes, nothing else really matters.

AJ

SEABEADARTIST
09-23-2003, 07:42 AM
I have been a artist since i was 4 years old when my father started my formal training in still lifes in pastels and charcoals...

when i tell people that they say well that doesn't make you a artist....that makes you someone who can draw...yes in a weird sense maybe .. but i took that foundation and soon taught myself to paint and to work with clay and found objects and finally those wonderful sparkly glass objects called BEADS...and fabric...

Does the medium you work in make you any less a artist....

if you take things thinking outside the box and create something amazingly beautiful that makes people smile or oooo and ahhhh

that is art.. maybe there is some struggle...but it is so glorious that i would never not want to create ..it is a gift...

sometimes i spend 60 hours creating a necklace one tiny bead at a time ..no pattern.. just painting it out as you would with paint on a canvas...does it make it less art because it is beads

I SAY NOT

there is only a beginning to imagination there is no end...LLC

this is such a wonderful forum and place of imagination ...

I recently started making lampwork beads and people are amazed how it happens ..when they come to my gallery and see me create a piece of glass art

I have been blessed with supportive people that i now own a gallery where i create my art .. teach other people to create art and support other artists in selling their work and understanding the talents they have.

Have a Beadiful Blessed day

TeAnne
09-23-2003, 07:54 AM
How does that saying go? "90% hard work (sweat) and 10% fun"
Sometimes I think this is true.

Stoy Jones
09-23-2003, 11:08 AM
Some people use art as a therapy. I wish I could. I struggle with my art as much as anything else in life, so why do I do it? I really don't know other than I'm driven to do it. I can't imagine not creating at all.

Stoy

Keith Russell
09-23-2003, 11:18 AM
In my opinion, to create 'amazingly beautiful' things is fine, but to be 'art' (in my opinion) a work must express something more than 'this work is quite pleasing to the eye'.

I believe that, to be art, a work must express the artist's view of the relationship between an individual human consciousness, and the external reality of our perceptions.

For me, the perception of reality alone, uninterpreted, unevaluated, is not enough.

K

pampe
09-23-2003, 11:45 AM
STRUGGLE:

a violent effort or exertion : an act of strongly motivated striving
~~Merriam-webster


For me, it's just not quite the right word


But then, I am not sure that what I do is "ART"



I believe that, to be art, a work must express the artist's view of the relationship between an individual human consciousness, and the external reality of our perceptions.

If this is the true definition...then for sure...I do not struggle and produce at this level

Mikey
09-23-2003, 03:16 PM
Originally posted by Keith Russell
In my opinion, to create 'amazingly beautiful' things is fine, but to be 'art' (in my opinion) a work must express something more than 'this work is quite pleasing to the eye'.

I believe that, to be art, a work must express the artist's view of the relationship between an individual human consciousness, and the external reality of our perceptions.

For me, the perception of reality alone, uninterpreted, unevaluated, is not enough.

K

Keith I agree with so much that you say. I suppose that's the artist's job, to make these things accessable to others. I used to do illustration, pure and simple. My present exploration is learning to see what is really in front of my eyes. Maybe after that I can move on. Who was it who said, "Manet is only an eye, but my God what an eye."

I am pleased and thankful to get so much reponse to this thread. It is helping me refine my own ideas.

Mikey:)

Mikey
09-23-2003, 05:08 PM
Originally posted by raindreemer


Hmm, I view things exactly the opposite. For me the "Real World" is my responsibility and my art, such as it is, is my salvation.

Its mine, it makes the real world go away and releases everything that inside of me, and if other people enjoy it thats wonderful but not necessary.

If I were to make it my responsibility, the passion would be lost.

As far as a struggle, right now I'm relearning everything after shutting out everything artistic for years, when I was younger and had those dreams of being an "ARTIST" the struggle was to do things "correctly".

I'm finding now that the struggle is only against myself, finding the means to let whats inside my head and heart out.

And each time I head a different direction with what I am doing, the struggle starts all over, and its a learning experience not only of what I can do but who I am. And undoubtedly my work now will change as I do.


AJ

Oh yes, but is art not part of your real world? It may be a great escape, like Len Deighton and co. are for me, but you are addressing something inside yourself. I am just finally learning not to struggle with myself, although I may struggle with ideas, but that can be good fun, well OK interesting. I always found new things exciting, although too many times got stuck in the rut, doing things correctly. How strange. It's been said already, I think, that struggle can be not just beneficial but, yes fun. I've got to think that may depend partly on personality, character and attitude.

Mikey

Keith Russell
09-23-2003, 05:13 PM
I don't believe in the existence of 'soul's.

However, I certainly believe in consciousness.

But--for me, at least--consciousness (dreams, emotions, and ideas) remain part of the 'real', 'natural', 'material' realm...

..such things exist, and are 'real'...

K

marilyn h
09-23-2003, 08:25 PM
Originally posted by raindreemer


Hmm, I view things exactly the opposite. For me the "Real World" is my responsibility and my art, such as it is, is my salvation.

Its mine, it makes the real world go away and releases everything that inside of me, and if other people enjoy it thats wonderful but not necessary.

If I were to make it my responsibility, the passion would be lost.

As far as a struggle, right now I'm relearning everything after shutting out everything artistic for years, when I was younger and had those dreams of being an "ARTIST" the struggle was to do things "correctly".

I'm finding now that the struggle is only against myself, finding the means to let whats inside my head and heart out.

And each time I head a different direction with what I am doing, the struggle starts all over, and its a learning experience not only of what I can do but who I am. And undoubtedly my work now will change as I do.

Whether people think I'm an artist, a wannabe, or someone with a cute little hobby makes not a bit of diffence to me. When I get to sneak away from the world and spend time with my paint and brushes, nothing else really matters.

AJ

I find that this is me, in a lot of ways. My art has changed with different emotions and situations in my life. It is my escape! My therapy! My own! Nobody is me or my art.

O'Connor
09-25-2003, 03:29 PM
Maybe it's just me, but I don't feel there's that much "struggle" in my arts.

First off, I have a vocational craft, as I am an audio-visual and cable television technician. I mention this because I have been at it for so long that I can look at a drawing (schematic or "signal flow" design drawing), or pictures on a monitor, or listen to the sound in an auditorium, and most of the time identify problems by "instinct". (Actually I suppose it's accumulated experience) It comes so easy for me, and most of the times the fixes are easy. A couple minutes, a couple things, and-poof!-it's fixed. Colleagues are sometimes awe-struck, or at least impressed, 'cause I didn't have to get out a bunch of test gear and go through step-by-step troubleshooting.

Music is the same for me (I'm a songwriting guitarist). It's as if the guitar (and my voice) are direct-connected to my brain. I play without even thinking about how it is I'm playing.

Of course, both these examples are things I've been doing for fifteen and 25 years, so that's probably a big part.

I've taken up painting in oils the last couple of years, and I don't see where I'm struggling. I mean I don't think my work is great or anything. I have some natural "eye", and some basic techniques down, and my work is fair to middling at this point. I am, however, somewhat satisfied with many of my present works.(Come on, are any of us ever completely satisfied with our work?)

I have an underlying theme in much of my work, although they mostly look like landscapes. The theme is actually rather deep, and it regards man's attempts to dominate nature and his surroundings, and nature's indominability, its propensity to "just keep going", and to "grow over" man's marks on this planet.

My paintings, however, usually evoke observations like "That's a cute outhouse. That's a pretty barn. That's a lovely sunset.".
Is this, then, my struggle? To present my works to the right people, those that will recognize the theme? Yet I don't feel any "inner struggle" or frustration if people don't "see" the theme.

I guess I'm also not real concerned with the rendering proficiency, partly because I see a lot of things called "art" that have, IMO, little viewability, lack of theme and symbolism, or are simply rendered poorly or in a primitive fashion.

Grandma Moses is famous as hell, has museum exhibits, and her work is quite simplistic, comparable to work I see coming from fourth graders. I don't dislike her work, in fact I find it attractive, cute and not without whimsy. I like it. If her work is so highly regarded, how can I get too up tight about my realist, representational stuff which looks halfway decent?

Maybe I don't want enough? Why pick it apart.

Jeez! I'm starting to sound like I'm in therapy.

Mikey
09-25-2003, 04:09 PM
Just maybe there is an itch inside of us waiting for expression. It's just out of mind's reach, so it just isn't the right time.

I think of Bridget Riley: she finished her training wondering what to do with her art career. The obvious thing seemed to paint a landscape, but Riley knew this was never going to be great art. She had to go through a time of seeming nothingness which must have been difficult for such an intelligent person. When the vision eventually come to birth she had something profoundly different. Whether her fame was due to the work itself, or somebody stealing it for fashion is by the way.

Mikey

tonigart
09-26-2003, 09:29 AM
One reason why art is a struggle is because there is no book out there that that says if you do a,b,c and then d,e,f will happen. There are art degrees out there but it isn't like an accounting degree where once you get a degree you get an accounting job and you have a good idea what the wage scale will be, what the work is, hours, and expectations.

Therefore I feel really blessed to be an artist, it is the ultimate "life game" and journey of faith. I am not a 9 to 5 person and have experienced something SPECIAL being an artist (all you artists should know what I am talking about) that those people could never find in their 9 to5 job!

Have a good weekend!
Toni

Mikey
09-26-2003, 11:56 AM
Originally posted by tonigart
One reason why art is a struggle is because there is no book out there that that says if you do a,b,c and then d,e,f will happen.
Toni

Good point

ninja-librarian
09-27-2003, 09:37 PM
Originally posted by Keith Russell
Didn't someone say that the only thing harder than (or, perhaps it was 'worse than') creating, is not creating?

I agree...

K

I had never heard this until now. It's so true for me, it hurts. I'm an artsy person in that there are several "mediums" that I enjoy, but the one that is my life's blood is acting. And I can sit here all day long and think well, I should have done this that way or I should have made that choice or zigged when I should have zagged, but it all comes down to the fact that I'm not creating, and there is no pain worse than that in my life.

People tell me join a community theatre or volunteer at a university theatre, but it's not the same. In fact, it's sometimes even more painful. A constant reminder that I'm not really doing what I want to do. What I have to do. And I feel like a failure for not succeeding, for not doing it better, for "giving up." But I have debt that has to be paid and cats that have to be fed and parents who don't need me sucking them dry for financial support while I'm an out-of-work actor.

So yes, I completely agree. Art is struggle. It's an albatross around the neck. It's painful and draining. It's the most euphoric high in the world. It's the only time that I am complete.

And I have no idea why I'm sitting here typing all this to strangers, other than I need to. And something about these strangers is very familiar. And this struggle is universal. And I need to believe in that right now.

Eugene Veszely
09-28-2003, 05:42 AM
Originally posted by Keith Russell
Didn't someone say that the only thing harder than (or, perhaps it was 'worse than') creating, is not creating?

I agree...

K

That could be why I am so unhappy with myself. My struggle is to do the action of painting, photography, etc. thinking up ides as to the "what of art" is the easy part....for me :)

Mikey
09-28-2003, 07:16 AM
Originally posted by ninja-librarian

And I have no idea why I'm sitting here typing all this to strangers, other than I need to. And something about these strangers is very familiar. And this struggle is universal. And I need to believe in that right now.

Yes, we have this great common ground of creativity and wonderful it can be. We argue about our different views and defend our various types of work to the point of shouting at each other, but this thing remains. It could be that like Manet and his friends we also need input from creatives in other fields to give us inspiration. So why not give us your input?

Mikey

DanaT
09-28-2003, 12:41 PM
Originally posted by 1chameleon


That could be why I am so unhappy with myself. My struggle is to do the action of painting, photography, etc. thinking up ides as to the "what of art" is the easy part....for me :)

That's right. That's why sometimes I think its better just to do the stuff and figure out if its art later. :p

Welcome to Wetcanvas.

Eugene Veszely
10-04-2003, 01:40 AM
Originally posted by DanaT


That's right. That's why sometimes I think its better just to do the stuff and figure out if its art later. :p

Welcome to Wetcanvas.

That is VERY hard for me to do.

diamondbird
10-13-2003, 08:06 PM
Dear Mikey
As a lone Artist, to me my painting is sometimes a real struggle. perhaps this is due to the fact that we live in an anti creative age. We are lone fish always swimming against the current of a very strong river.
The Australian Aboriginal people, well known for their creative traditional culture spanniing the last 15000 years, have a saying.
this is: if a society of people lose their dreaming (that is their creativity, and their abiltity not only to dream, but to share that dreaming through communal and invidual painting, dance and song) then that society is dying.
To keep the heart and soul of our society alive, artists must be creative. And the reward comes in making of our art.

Helen:) :)

Mikey
10-14-2003, 06:29 AM
Originally posted by Helen Duley
Dear Mikey
As a lone Artist, to me my painting is sometimes a real struggle. perhaps this is due to the fact that we live in an anti creative age. We are lone fish always swimming against the current of a very strong river.
The Australian Aboriginal people, well known for their creative traditional culture spanniing the last 15000 years, have a saying.
this is: if a society of people lose their dreaming (that is their creativity, and their abiltity not only to dream, but to share that dreaming through communal and invidual painting, dance and song) then that society is dying.
To keep the heart and soul of our society alive, artists must be creative. And the reward comes in making of our art.

Helen:) :)

Helen,

You've come to a good place at WC. It's not the same as meeting people face to face, but meeting a whole variety of people online is a great benefit. We look forward to seeing some of your work, and your presence in the forums.

Click on the Profile button and contact me by PM or e-mail if you wish.

Mikey

Andrew
10-14-2003, 09:28 AM
From my expericence, when art is going good it is really good. When it isn't, it is a real pain in the arse. My art has highs and lows. The biggest struggle for me is fitting it in to my daily schedule. It would be less of a struggle if God would grant me a 36hr day.

Andrew

The Painted Dog
10-14-2003, 11:03 PM
I went through my whole career as a nurse. I worked in many realms of nursing and now I think back on it and I was just programmed what to do and what to say..I was well educated as a nurse ..but a robot..trying not to take the grief home and store it away in that part of ourselves that we don't talk about..As a newborn artist. I taste it feel it. smell it and can't sleep sometimes thinking about a piece I'm working on.. I never felt so alive as I do now through my art. It's a struggle at times but I take that as a learning opportunity to become what I want to be in this new career that has chosen me....Maybe this is my way of finding myself in all the souls that have touched me..I introduce myself for the first time as an artist and not a nurse..words that didn't come easy..but now feel comfortable ...and of all the shots and enemas I gave no one thanked me or sent me gifts and money like they do through my art...lol...;)

Eugene Veszely
10-17-2003, 12:00 PM
*Still struggling*

JoyJoyJoy
10-17-2003, 01:42 PM
Very interesting discussion.

Helen... lovely quote. Thank you for sharing.

I have been painting for 45 years, since age 5. Painting/drawing/creating has always been a deep passion and incredible joy to me.... until recently, when I began marketing my paintings. Being self-taught... my decades of artistic work has been a exciting exploration of styles and techniques. I dreamt of painting, read every book I could find, read artists' biographies... and could not wait to get to sleep each night, so excited about jumping out of bed at 4:30 am the next morning to get 3 hours of painting done before going to my salaried job. I am now retired from the 9-to-5.

Since putting my paintings on eBay (been doing well, thank you), I find the creative process more of a stuggle. To understand the market, paint subject and technique suitable for that market... and feeling pressure to paint as a job, rather than a passion... takes away some of the fun. Once I get to the canvas, I am my old, passionate self... but the idea of working for an audience makes for struggle in areas of creativity and motivation.

Nance

Cathy Morgan
10-17-2003, 09:53 PM
Nance, are you sure you need and want to do it this way? Seems as if the sense of struggle is telling you something. Maybe you're assuming that you have to adapt to certain schedules, market interests, etc. when what the world really needs from you is what you most want to paint - from your deepest self. And if ebay isn't the best market for it - so what - there are others.

I know all this is easier said than believed - and I'm talking to myself as well as you.

It's funny, what I expected to read when I saw your name on the last post in this thread, was something along the lines of "it doesn't have to feel like a struggle. It can be a joy!"

I used to call my art business Ecstasy Forge - because I started as an artist blacksmith and ecstasy is the one thing you can't force or control. I decided to change it when I decided I'd make a website. You can guess what kind of traffic I'd attract using the name "ecstasy." And the rising interest in the drug called Ecstasy also made it a problem.

Making my bowls at Ecstasy Forge wasn't always ecstatic. Sometimes it was struggle. But at least I knew the struggle was something I brought to it myself. I've always been attracted to your WetCanvas name because of this association. I really hope you'll find a way to make every day joyous again - you deserve it! And the world needs your heartfelt art.

Rose Queen
10-17-2003, 11:02 PM
I won't promise you it will be easy going, but y'all might like to read The Van Gogh Blues by Eric Maisel. I just finished it and am probably going to start it again tonight, as it can be tough going, but reading the posts in this thread, I think a lot of you would find both comfort and inspiration in the book. Maisel is a therapist who works only with creative people and the entire thrust of this book is the search for meaning by creative people through the creative process.



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