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View Full Version : Getting a vintage "yellowed" look.


Kory
10-16-2013, 11:50 PM
I had the thought today that I could just add 10% yellow ochre into all my mixtures on a given painting to make it look "vintage".

But then I thought, would that make my skies green, etc? Should I just glaze it with a thinned yellow ochre after the painting is done?

Has anyone thought about this?

opainter
10-17-2013, 01:42 AM
How about using a different color instead of white? Perhaps a mixture of white with yellow ochre? Personally, I would try a mix of white with naples yellow as I don't think you would have as much of a "greening" problem with that. I'm not sure that mixing a yellow with all of your mixtures would be necessary.

Mythrill
10-17-2013, 06:18 AM
I had the thought today that I could just add 10% yellow ochre into all my mixtures on a given painting to make it look "vintage".

But then I thought, would that make my skies green, etc? Should I just glaze it with a thinned yellow ochre after the painting is done?

Has anyone thought about this?
Keywords: Buff Titanium (also known as Titanium Buff, Unbleached Titanium, etc.) Either the single-pigment version (PW6:1) or the premixed one (PW6 + PY42) do wonders to get your "vintage" look (this is even truer if you paint wet-on-wet.) You can also mix a hue yourself by mixing regular Titanium White (PW6) with Raw Umber (Pbr7) for a cooler, neutral mix, or with Transparent Yellow Oxide (PY42) to get a beautiful, golden whitish color that will "magically" make all your colors "vintage."

WFMartin
10-19-2013, 12:46 AM
I generally am a "glazer", when it comes to creating an overall "ambiance" to a painting, applying very thin layers of color over the surface of the dried painting. However, with the following painting, I actually used a great deal of "Yellow" in the form of "Indian Yellow" by mixing it with the paint for each brush stroke, to create the overall effect that I wanted.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Oct-2013/13079-Where_Old_Ghosts_Meet_Final.jpg
"Where Old Ghosts Meet"...16" x 20" oil on RayMar Canvas Panel. Award Of Merit, PFAA Fall Show.

Indian Yellow, an "orangey yellow", is often an underrated color. It has as one of its attributes its transparency, and that makes it ideal for the creation of dark colors when desired, using this transparent paint with other transparent [or opaque] paints to create some nice effects.

One thing I'd like to point out is that if I were to have glazed a yellow of some sort over the entire painting, I would have neutralized the subtle, "Blue-Violet" cast shadows that are prevalent on the street. These complementary Blue colors are, indeed, important to the effect that I wanted, and I feel that glazing over them with a complementary color would have been counterproductive for the effect that I envisioned.

Mythrill
10-19-2013, 06:17 AM
I generally am a "glazer", when it comes to creating an overall "ambiance" to a painting, applying very thin layers of color over the surface of the dried painting. However, with the following painting, I actually used a great deal of "Yellow" in the form of "Indian Yellow" by mixing it with the paint for each brush stroke, to create the overall effect that I wanted.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Oct-2013/13079-Where_Old_Ghosts_Meet_Final.jpg
"Where Old Ghosts Meet"...16" x 20" oil on RayMar Canvas Panel. Award Of Merit, PFAA Fall Show.

Indian Yellow, an "orangey yellow", is often an underrated color. It has as one of its attributes its transparency, and that makes it ideal for the creation of dark colors when desired, using this transparent paint with other transparent [or opaque] paints to create some nice effects.

One thing I'd like to point out is that if I were to have glazed a yellow of some sort over the entire painting, I would have neutralized the subtle, "Blue-Violet" cast shadows that are prevalent on the street. These complementary Blue colors are, indeed, important to the effect that I wanted, and I feel that glazing over them with a complementary color would have been counterproductive for the effect that I envisioned.
Hi, Martin.

Beautiful painting. The yellow cast gives me a strong idea of a sunrise / sunset.

I agree that many forms of "Indian Yellow" are underrated, but I believe that happens either because:
A person prefers painting opaque over transparent, and will use colors high tinting strength.
The painter does use glazing either as a primary or secondary technique, but doesn't really know how to use different techniques of glazing to reach different effects.
This is very noticeable in acrylics, as Zinc White (PW4) is rarely sold and Lead White (PW1) is not an option (probably due to some incompatibility with acrylic emulsion.) The easiest options for the painter would be adding water to the medium (which might damage the paint film if it's not sturdy enough or if you dilute paint too much) or to add acrylic emulsion (safer, but the more you add emulsion to lighten the paint, the more "tacky" it gets, making your painting even more prone to dust.) In acrylics, I use a mix of calcium sulfate ("gypsum") and acrylic emulsion to lighten colors and keep paint film stable, but that wouldn't be an option for many painters: this mix is very simple to make, this it isn't sold, for the more calcium sulfate the paint has, the more matte colors get which is unattractive to many acrylic painters, and many of them wouldn't agree on how strong this medium should be, either.

The best option would be to mull your own mix, but many people won't do this because it requires time, space and it is potentially hazardous (you'll usually want to store the mix, and the only option that's easily available to preserve paint PH so you can store the mix is to add household ammonia to it, which will corrode your respiratory system if you don't have a respirator.)

Regarding your version of Indian Yellow, what do you use? Something like PY110, which tends to a more neutral yellow? PY150, which tends to have a more brownish cast? Or is it something like PY153, which tends to be more orange?

Gigalot
10-19-2013, 04:45 PM
I guess, it is Disazo condensation PY128.

PW7, Zinc sulphide is available for Acrylic paints. It might be a good white pigment, which can replace Lead for acrylic usage.

Gigalot
10-20-2013, 04:59 AM
The easiest options for the painter would be adding water to the medium (which might damage the paint film if it's not sturdy enough or if you dilute paint too much) or to add acrylic emulsion (safer, but the more you add emulsion to lighten the paint, the more "tacky" it gets, making your painting even more prone to dust.

Try distilled water, add a tiny amount of ammonia (2-3 drops), 3-4 crystals of sugar, 3-4 crystals of sodium fluoride as preservative and add ~20% of egg yolk there. Egg is not tacky forever as acrylic emulsion is. People use yolk to mix with oil, but I guess, it might be much better in acrylic. I am not acrylist and I use acrylic primarily to make a good primer and therefore you can find better proportions for acrylic-egg glazing medium. Egg is also good stabilizer and emulsifier itself. Just invent proper recipe! :)

WFMartin
10-20-2013, 06:36 PM
Regarding your version of Indian Yellow, what do you use? Something like PY110, which tends to a more neutral yellow? PY150, which tends to have a more brownish cast? Or is it something like PY153, which tends to be more orange?

Funny that you should ask about that. For this painting I was using up some really old, Bill Alexander oil paint. He was the precursor to Bob Ross, so this paint is really old, and because of its proprietary manufacture, the pigment ID is nowhere to be found on the tube. So,...sorry but I do not know what the exact pigment is.:o However, I can tell you that it is quite an "orangey yellow".

Cindy Schnackel
10-21-2013, 01:53 AM
Gorgeous work, wfmartin! I'm also a glazer, probably a leftover influence from my theater/faux finish jobs years ago, where so much stuff had to be 'aged.'

Mythrill
10-21-2013, 04:44 AM
Funny that you should ask about that. For this painting I was using up some really old, Bill Alexander oil paint. He was the precursor to Bob Ross, so this paint is really old, and because of its proprietary manufacture, the pigment ID is nowhere to be found on the tube. So,...sorry but I do not know what the exact pigment is.:o However, I can tell you that it is quite an "orangey yellow".
Hi, Martin!

Even though you don't know the exact pigment ID, knowing the cast alone is very helpful. I can think of a few convenience mixes with transparent pigments that could give me this useful, warm cast that you use (Nickel Azo Yellow, PY150, + Permanent Rose, PV19-gamma, for instance, come to my mind.)

Thank you! :)

Mythrill
10-21-2013, 04:50 AM
Try distilled water, add a tiny amount of ammonia (2-3 drops), 3-4 crystals of sugar, 3-4 crystals of sodium fluoride as preservative and add ~20% of egg yolk there. Egg is not tacky forever as acrylic emulsion is. People use yolk to mix with oil, but I guess, it might be much better in acrylic. I am not acrylist and I use acrylic primarily to make a good primer and therefore you can find better proportions for acrylic-egg glazing medium. Egg is also good stabilizer and emulsifier itself. Just invent proper recipe! :)
Hi Giga,

Unfortunately, as I'm not a chemist, I don't have access to pure sodium fluoride to test this at least, not easily. I can only buy it as a mouthwash, and in this form, it makes the film of stored paint deteriorate in 2-3 days, approximately. Perhaps the pure form of sodium fluoride is different, but I have no idea of how to buy it, toxicity, and how long the paint lasts in the tube.

Gigalot
10-21-2013, 05:19 AM
OK, old masters didn't have preservatives. They used egg yolk "as is". I guess, picture varnish on top of your painting can preserve surface against rot.