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View Full Version : More tests: effects of two layers (lots of images!))


0chre
10-13-2013, 09:21 AM
Because I didn't have a real, practical knowledge of the effects of different combinations of factors in layers, I did some tests. The factors I wanted to test were: dark/light, transparant/opaque, saturated/unsaturated and sameness of hue/contrasting hue.

The grid

To test the possible combinations systematically I made a grid. In the first layer, I painted in rows:
Unsaturated, light, transparant
Unsaturated, light, opaque
Unsaturated, dark, transparant
Unsaturated, dark, opaque
Saturated, light, transparant
Saturated, light, opaque
Saturated, dark, transparant
Saturated, dark, opaqueIn warm colors (upper half) and in cool colors (lower half)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Oct-2013/211143-1stlayer.jpg

Over this I painted in columns:
Unsaturated, light, transparant
Unsaturated, light, opaque
Unsaturated, dark, transparant
Unsaturated, dark, opaque
Saturated, light, transparant
Saturated, light, opaque
Saturated, dark, transparant
Saturated, dark, opaqueSame sort of hue in the left half, and a contrasting hue in the right half. This created all possible combinations (within the limitations of the pigments I have).



http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Oct-2013/211143-2ndlayerb.jpg

In more detail

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Oct-2013/211143-1stquadrant.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Oct-2013/211143-2ndquadrant.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Oct-2013/211143-3rdquadrant.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Oct-2013/211143-4thquadrant.jpg

As was to be expected, not all of the combinations were as successful or useful to me (although some specific application may be found for all of them), but some I like very much.

Sameness of hue:

First layer: Saturated, light, opaque + Second layer: Unsaturated, dark, transparant
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Oct-2013/211143-1stquadrantC6.jpg

First layer: Unsaturated, dark, transparant + Second layer: Saturated, dark, transparant
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Oct-2013/211143-1stquadrantC7.jpg

First layer: Saturated, light, opaque + Second layer: Saturated, light, transparant
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Oct-2013/211143-1stquadrantE6.jpg

First layer: Unsaturated, light, opaque + Second layer: Saturated, light, opaque
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Oct-2013/211143-1stquadrantF2.jpg

First layer: Saturated, light, opaque + Second layer: Saturated, dark, transparant
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Oct-2013/211143-1stquadrantG6.jpg

First layer: Unsaturated, light, opaque + Second layer: Saturated, light, opaque
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Oct-2013/211143-2ndquadrantF2.jpg

First layer: Saturated, light, opaque + Second layer: Saturated, dark, transparant
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Oct-2013/211143-2ndquadrantG6.jpg

Contrasting hues

The contrasting hues were less useful to me. Using a contrasting hue in the underlayer is mainly useful for opaque, cool grays, I think.

First layer: Unsaturated, light, transparant + Second layer: Unsaturated, light, opaque
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Oct-2013/211143-3rdquadrantB1.jpg

First layer: Saturated, light, opaque + Second layer: Unsaturated, light, opaque
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Oct-2013/211143-3rdquadrantB6.jpg

General conclusions

In general I would say that:
dark, transparant overpaintings have their "maximum effect" when painted over a light underpainting in the same sort of hue.
light, opaque, saturated overpaintings have their "maximum effect" when painted over a light, unsaturated underpainting in the same sort of hue
gray opaque overpaintings have their "maximum effect" when painted over a warm underpaintingOf course, you don't need (or want!) maximum effects throughout your entire painting, so other combinations have their uses, but less than maximum effects are easier to achieve "by accident".

WFMartin
10-13-2013, 11:23 PM
Holey Mackerel! Just paint a doggone PAINTING ! !! I may consider myself a "color theorist" but overkill is overkill! One can only test theories and procedures so much. Just PAINT a PICTURE.:D :D

WFMartin
10-14-2013, 02:25 AM
Sorry if I have seemed to be a bit "coarse", but really most of these conditions can be quite effectively "tested" on a painting while it is in progress. A stroke or two will often determine whether an application is going to create the effect you wish.

Obviously, I'm not a "color chart" person.:lol:

0chre
10-14-2013, 03:28 AM
Holey Mackerel! Just paint a doggone PAINTING ! !! I may consider myself a "color theorist" but overkill is overkill! One can only test theories and procedures so much. Just PAINT a PICTURE.:D :D
Sorry if I have seemed to be a bit "coarse", but really most of these conditions can be quite effectively "tested" on a painting while it is in progress. A stroke or two will often determine whether an application is going to create the effect you wish.

Obviously, I'm not a "color chart" person.:lol:Thanksfor this extremely useful contribution :rolleyes:, but I know what I'm doing and can make my own decisions, thank you... To each his own. Live and let live. Etc.

WFMartin
10-14-2013, 03:26 PM
Well, I really must apologize to you. We all glean value, and enjoyment from doing many sorts of things that are related to painting, some of which may seem unimportant or redundant to others, and we should all be respectful of each others' approaches, for sure.

For example, I personally take great pride in canvas preparation--an act that may seem pure nonsense to those who prefer not to do that. I also take a great deal of enjoyment in the simple polishing of my wooden palette after each session. What some consider a "chore", I find great satisfaction in doing.

So, you are, indeed, correct.....to each his own. You are performing a procedure that you consider to be important to your operation, and I should have respected your desire to do so.

So.......I'm sorry.:o

0chre
10-15-2013, 07:19 AM
Thanks for your reply, it's much appreciated. Don't worry about it, we all say things we wish we hadn't, sometimes. I hope my sarcastic remark hasn't made you feel too bad. Your apologies are kindly accepted and much appreciated! :)

(BTW, I totally understand your enjoyment of polishing your palette. I enjoyed it very much, too, when I used a wooden palette and thought I was a bit loopy for getting pleasure from cleaning and polishing it! ;))

Deshy
10-17-2013, 01:27 AM
I once did this myself but later realised that I don't remember half of what I mixed. :( I'm trying to learn as I paint, because I'm too lazy for this kind of color study. I need to expand my color palette seriously though. I'm pretty limited right now. :( Trying to learn this color business, so thanks a lot for sharing your findings and taking the time to do this.

0chre
10-17-2013, 04:30 AM
I once did this myself but later realised that I don't remember half of what I mixed. :( I'm trying to learn as I paint, because I'm too lazy for this kind of color study. I need to expand my color palette seriously though. I'm pretty limited right now. :( Trying to learn this color business, so thanks a lot for sharing your findings and taking the time to do this.You're welcome! A limited palette can be very effective though and can lead to impressive results. It can be a very good way to learn the "color business".

Mythrill
10-17-2013, 06:23 AM
I once did this myself but later realised that I don't remember half of what I mixed. :( I'm trying to learn as I paint, because I'm too lazy for this kind of color study. I need to expand my color palette seriously though. I'm pretty limited right now. :( Trying to learn this color business, so thanks a lot for sharing your findings and taking the time to do this.

Deshy, the color chars are very useful if you have trouble remembering mixes! Write down the two base colors used, the proportions (if you can measure them,) the resulting mix, and keep the color chart for future reference.

When I'm working on a particular painting, if I'm in doubt about which blue to use, for instance, I mix them both with different colors and wait the results to dry. I hope this helps you!