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DillpickleNZ
09-11-2013, 08:45 PM
Hi, I just tried to post the following in Open Critique Forum but got an error message, so will try here. (luckily I managed to copy my blurb, before losing it so here's the paste):

Atrocious weather here in Auckland, sky's getting darker by the minute and too dark to paint.
I've been working on this painting for some time and I'm sort-of stuck.
The Rocky bay store is/was an iconic building with heritage status and much loved by Waihekians.
I took the photo some years ago before it fell into disrepair and is now a mere shadow of itself.
The picture shows only the right half of both the painting and the photo to reduce file size.
Where I'm stuck is the area beneath the veranda. I'm mainly a landscape painter and have trouble with those straight lines of houses.

What I would like to know is, how much detail is necessary, do I really need to paint every window sill, doorpost etc? Also what paint mix should I use for the shadowy areas under the roof?
The greens of the painted foliage is not quite as bright green as show here, but is still too green compared with the photo. What paint mix would come closer do you think?
Any and all C & C welcome.
Thanks, Emma
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/11-Sep-2013/42101-rbstore-4WC_upload.jpg

DillpickleNZ
09-11-2013, 08:55 PM
PS, this is acrylic paint on canvas sheet from pad. 30cm h x 39cm w. To add a little interest to the expanse of road in front, I decided to add some roosters (another iconic sight on Waiheke). I need to redo the smaller one on the right, it looks too amateurish!

La_
09-12-2013, 02:56 AM
you've started with a good sketch and fairly solid, crisp paint coverage, mostly foreground stuff ... behind foreground can certainly be less pronounced, secondary, alluded to, softer, lighter.
more importantly is to give focus to important areas with the strongest value contrasts. in other words, work hardest, most accurately on everything important to the scene and composition, lead the viewer into the point of the scene gently, subtly, and with thought. for example - trees are awesome, but secondary to the overall scene here so your building, being the point, should be worked to above the level of sophistication of the trees. the roosters are a fantastic balance tool and should be at the same level of coverage as the building, maybe more given that they're closer to us and smaller.

la

La_
09-12-2013, 02:59 AM
oh, and the shadow color looks redish green to me, probably a titch of blue with that for the darkest shadows ... super soft tho, keep it all 'back there'.

la

DillpickleNZ
09-12-2013, 04:01 AM
you've started with a good sketch and fairly solid, crisp paint coverage, mostly foreground stuff ... behind foreground can certainly be less pronounced, secondary, alluded to, softer, lighter.
more importantly is to give focus to important areas with the strongest value contrasts. in other words, work hardest, most accurately on everything important to the scene and composition, lead the viewer into the point of the scene gently, subtly, and with thought. for example - trees are awesome, but secondary to the overall scene here so your building, being the point, should be worked to above the level of sophistication of the trees. the roosters are a fantastic balance tool and should be at the same level of coverage as the building, maybe more given that they're closer to us and smaller.

la
Thank you la. I'm afraid my eyes started glazing over somewhat at: quote from above: more importantly is to give focus to important areas with the strongest value contrasts. in other words, work hardest, most accurately on everything important to the scene and composition, lead the viewer into the point of the scene gently, subtly, and with thought.
I'm sorry, but I don't feel my questions were really answered. No offence intended. Thanks for responding la, I really do appreciate it.
Emma.

Dana Design
09-12-2013, 03:10 PM
Looking good! I love these old stores and it's too bad that it's fallen into disrepair. Keep painting!

La_
09-12-2013, 03:48 PM
What I would like to know is, how much detail is necessary, do I really need to paint every window sill, doorpost etc?

not with any super duper great detail, no.

Also what paint mix should I use for the shadowy areas under the roof?

redish green (variations of green with a bit of red in it).

The greens of the painted foliage is not quite as bright green as show here, but is still too green compared with the photo. What paint mix would come closer do you think?

variations of ultra blue (and/or prussian blue for super dark green), cad yellow, yellow ochre and alizarin (red being greens compliment, will dull (called greying but really it's browning) the bright).

la

DillpickleNZ
09-13-2013, 08:28 PM
With apologies for tardy response la, I've only just found my original post, it had disappeared into the ether and couldn't remember where I posted it or how to go about finding my previous posts!
So, thank you muchly for this advice, I'm now busily mixing your suggested colours and they are looking much better so far, coming in handy in my current effort too.
For some reason I'm still hesitant (scared?) to start the 'under the veranda' stuff, it's quite frustrating. I've put it aside for now and have started a painting of an other Auckland landmark 'Piha beach' a landscape without straight edges (except for the horizon of course, but I can cope with that lol)
Thanks again,
Emma

snoball
09-14-2013, 08:25 AM
You could work the "under the porch" area (see below)from a blurred photo and then go back to your original sharp photo for the posts and containers and plants. I would personally use a purple cast for the shadows under the porch as well as adding a bit to the darker shadows back in the trees. You've got a great start here.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Sep-2013/36183-blur.jpg

eyecandy2
09-14-2013, 05:23 PM
You have to at least color in the outlines of the doors and windows. I would also push the trees back a bit by glazing some of the sky color over the trees that are further back just to create more depth to your painting. I do love the subject matter. They have become hard to find.

AllisonR
09-15-2013, 09:49 AM
Adding roosters is a good addition, cuts that flat, boring grey space.
You are looking at a photo, where everything is sharp. I think you will paint a lot better if you do it from life. I know about the rain, it has been raining for 9 days here, but when the sun comes out get out there!

What is your poi? The building, then make that sharp. Make the trees in the background loose, softer, more abstract shape - a hint of a certain tree. All of your trees are the same yellow green and same value. Now look at your photo - palm tree is yellow green, trees behind have a lot of more blue green and darker values - add some black (black and yellow make beautiful greens) and add some red in there - more red than you think, to get a natural tree color. Use an earth red. Trees on top left also have some more dark and a lot more dull than say your palm or your nearly neon tree in front of building. Not sure why you left out red tree in front pot, the pots are interesting because two are empty, one is different, but in your final you have 3 even empty pots.

Rocky Barnett
09-16-2013, 01:17 AM
I know you have not asked, but I,d like to throw my two cents in about the road.(before you get to far along with it.)
Just remember: lighter in the distance, darker in the fore ground. Little patches of color for texture in the back, big ones in the front...(like painting an ocean, only subtle.) This can lead one into the painting and establish linear distance as much as anything else given it is such a large part of the scene.
This is a great subject for a painting and you have a good start....I will love to see the next update on this one.....so don't leave it aside too long!

Humbly
Rocky

DillpickleNZ
09-16-2013, 04:06 AM
With thanks to:
snoball, good idea about the blurring, seems a little less daunting that way
eyecandy, will do the glazing of distant trees
allison, unfortunately, the store is no longer as it was in the photo. In fact, it was already closed and abandoned by the owner in this photo. Great suggestions re the variations needed in the trees etc. As for the pots in front, I will tend to them when I'm happy with the front porch. Btw, the 'red' plant in the first pot is a dead plant lol! I'm planning to put in a live one and some flowers in the other ones, as there used to be when the shop was open.
Rocky B, Thanks for your suggestions on the road, I'd been thinking it needed something, hence the roosters but the light at back and darker in front is excellent advice, thanks all. Here's the full size one, obviously not worked on since 1st picture:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Sep-2013/42101-rocky-bay-store-painting1.jpg

lmfmartinez
09-16-2013, 04:14 PM
Seeing the whole composition really makes a difference! The under-porch area seems less important now. Neat picture--I hope you'll post the finished piece when you're done with it!