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Mikey
09-15-2003, 06:39 PM
MY IMAGE(S):
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/upload_spool/09-15-2003/28043_library.jpg


GENERAL INFORMATION:
Title: Rugby Library
Year Created: 2003
Medium: Acrylic
Surface: Board
Dimension: 48x31 inches
Allow digital alterations?: Yes!

MY COMMENTS:
A difficult painting, yet I reckon even if I fail this is not wasted effort. The northern aspect of the building makes front lighting difficult to obtain.

I took this from my own photo and unfortunately had to set the zoom to 28mm.

MY QUESTIONS FOR THE GROUP:
I'm very uncertain about this painting, so criticism would be appreciated.

Mikey

giniaad
09-15-2003, 07:36 PM
the long window
the lines are off
the big opening and
the smaller sections
the bottom looks good
it goes off starting
about a third of the way up

it looks really good all in all

maybe play with that foreground flower ball...
mess it up a bit...something...just too ordinary
(not that there is anything wrong with that;) )

the only other thing I can think of
is to use some of that orange
mixed with the blue
to make the darks
for more unity

good luck Mikey...paint on

coulter
09-15-2003, 08:47 PM
Sorry I don't have enough experience to critique, but I just wanted to say that the name and then the image that comes up are wonderfully whimsical!!!

I suspect some perspectives are off but within the painting itself are some real gems that make the trip worthwhile!

Mark

jerryW
09-15-2003, 09:12 PM
I know you didn't but it looks a bit like you used a ruler onthis.

I think you could get away with that type of thing if you exagerrated the angles and tilts and arcs
pressing more towards natural abstraction

what holds this together is glass maybe - but the glass is not connected well enough yet.

leverettfinn
09-16-2003, 07:34 AM
I REALLY, REALLY like parts of this....The skewed window in the peach wall (my favorite part of the piece)...the abstracted blue grays of the glass...the metal rail that leads you in from the left...but, for me ...the light poles and flowers detract...the values seem too dark and I keep wishing they weren't there.

Lauren

Diyart
11-23-2004, 09:23 AM
hello,
when screening the forums for some information on Rugby,Warwickshire,(a special topic of interest for me) I came across this painting.
Maybe your uncertainty has dissappeared already,but may be another opinion/feedback might be appreciated still.

This work seems to me as a quite professional architecture study. The colors
emphasize the cool atmosphere of the modern building.The handruler forces the viewers eyes into the image from the bottom to follow along the light stand way up to the buildings roof.The illusion of spatial depth is created by the sequence of light stands with flowers and the view to the parking lot.
Nevertheless the depth of the buildings seems to be compressed.
Extra tension is created by taking important verticals out of the exact vertical
direction.

Most interesting and important is the area around the entrance door were you can see not only a "window" view of the parking lot but a kind of broken view of cars through a window plus some reflections. Thus the viewer can explore the continued space behind the building from the right side with direct view through the door and finally through a closed window. Also some space in front of the building can be seen as a reflection.


Another remarbable feature are the flower pots which contrast in form and color (temparture) with the building. These flowers are the only living things. The way they are presented show the strong will of the public hand to form
or to underthrow even this decorative element to a very strict order.
As a result the whole scenery has a kind of sterile atmosphere, this is even enhanced by the total absence of human beings.

In my opinion the image cannot be seen as a naive depiction of a building rather than a determined reflection on a specific "city" situation.

The colors seem to be layed down in several layers. Especially the "reflection" area and door situation are technically very demanding. Using variations of blue on the building front gives the impression of aluminium or glas surface.


Slight critic is evoked by the overlapping shape of the waste bin with the
light stand in the background. Also the coincidence of one light stand with the
edge of the building on the right side seems to be a bit unfavorable.
The light situation on the floor in front of the building has obviously caused some difficulties as shadows and reflected light mix up a complicated pattern.

In total however the painting is a very convincing and interesting work which keeps the viewers eyes busy and causes questions about humans and their role/function in this environment.

Martin

Mikey
11-23-2004, 10:13 AM
Martin, thanks for delving deep and looking. I do have other paintings of Rugby on Wet Canvas. Call them graphic, illustration, or whatever.

The amazing thing about this building is just how lucky we are in Rugby to have it, which is after all a fairly insignificant market town of about 85,000 people. It's claim to fame is the school and Tom Brown's School Days, written by Hughes.

Mikey

earthbot1
11-23-2004, 10:26 AM
Very nice Mikey! Lots of good comments...the tall window is only thing that seems off to me.
I really like the overall feel and colors. Good job.

Diyart
11-23-2004, 10:32 AM
Hello Mikey

thank you for posting some interior images.. very nice gallery space.
I didn`t believe that the name of the town was in connection with this
funny game invented there.
Also don`t forget "Mugby junction" and the jet engine ..
the discoverer of helium was born in Rugby etc.... :) .

Martin

Mikey
11-23-2004, 10:45 AM
Hello Mikey

thank you for posting some interior images.. very nice gallery space.
I didn`t believe that the name of the town was in connection with this
funny game invented there.
Also don`t forget "Mugby junction" and the jet engine ..
the discoverer of helium was born in Rugby etc.... :) .

Martin

And the hologram, by Gabor.

The origins of the name go way back in history. The 'by' ending would seem to be Danish rather than Saxon. Rugby was pretty much nether land between these two warring factions. But it is likely the origin is Saxon and the 'by' was added later. So the game is named after the town and nor Cardiff Arms Park. The story of William Webb Ellis "taking the ball in his arms with a fine disregard for the game of football" is well entrenched in tales of Rugby, but was apparently a matter of after dinner talk which seems to have established itself as fact. Webb Ellis disappeared into obscurity, but his grave has been found in France with evidence that he was a minor clergyman.

Mikey

dornberg
11-23-2004, 05:33 PM
very active construction

Mikey
11-23-2004, 05:56 PM
very active construction

Thanks for your comment Dornberg. Now I have a confession to make: I painted over this one.

Mikey

Diyart
11-24-2004, 03:35 AM
Thanks for your comment Dornberg. Now I have a confession to make: I painted over this one.

Mikey
:D :D :D

Gilberte
11-24-2004, 02:49 PM
Thanks for your comment Dornberg. Now I have a confession to make: I painted over this one.

Mikey

Are you serious ?

Mikey
11-24-2004, 02:51 PM
Are you serious ?

:o

Michael-Ann
11-24-2004, 03:23 PM
I can't believe you painted over this Mikey. I thought it was wonderful. :eek: So now you must show and tell what you covered it with!!

Mikey
11-24-2004, 04:08 PM
Hi Michael-Ann, I didn't have any idea how to evaluate this painting, good bad, or hopeless, but the reception it got was the thing wasn't much. I painted Chiatsu in the rock pool over it, and you will have seen that. I think it was my last acrylic painting.

Martin, the flowers are an essential part of the Rugby Scene. We have won the Britiain in Bloom competition for a few years running and the town is determined to win it every year regardless of the surrounding architecture. I used this photo for another painting which I haven't yet painted over. It's one of my early ones on WC posted sometime last year, but I think painted before I joined.

Mikey

Diyart
11-25-2004, 03:54 AM
thank you for this nice view of Rugby.
I think that Rugby can`t be a bad place were people put so much effort in
flowers ! Usually "green" is neglected in our towns and mostly used as a kind
of architecture parsley.
I haven`t found any information on the world war II and the damage
that probably was caused by the Germans during that period.
Rugby is relatively close to Coventry.. did this have an influence ?

Our next bigger town with about 90 000 people is Pforzheim. My wife was born there. This town was almost completely destroyed in the war. It was rebuild quickly and therefore the city is so ugly and "cold".

Overpainting is an interesting thing. I do this quite often,but with oils you have to wait 6 months until get a dry underground.
At the end of the year I destroy always those works that I do not like
or do not find important. But before doing this I let some time pass.
One of the paintings on my website was rescued by a visitor because I wanted to destroy it shortly after having done it. So I have learned to put these things away for a good while and than reconsider.

Martin

Mikey
11-25-2004, 05:58 AM
Hi Martin,

There are no great signs of bomb damage to Rugby, even though some of the factorys would have been important. It was never a target and Coventry was the focus. Even in that city which was famous for vehicle manufacture the damage was mostly in the centre, and certainly didn't seem to equal what the British bombers to did to certain German cities.

I have to say that present day Coventry isn't the most attractive place on earth. Architecture went through a most unfortunate phase, especially in the 60's. Old and even ancient buildings in Rugby were torn down to make way for the trite and ugly.

I'm a Londoner originally and recall first going to work in the City by St. Pauls to see acre after acre of raised building foundations as far as eye could see still not rebuilt. The great fun was to hear a flying bomb engine cut out and wait for it.

Mikey

Diyart
11-25-2004, 10:43 AM
Hi Martin,

I'm a Londoner originally and recall first going to work in the City by St. Pauls to see acre after acre of raised building foundations as far as eye could see still not rebuilt. The great fun was to hear a flying bomb engine cut out and wait for it.

Mikey

Hello Mikey..
incredible .. so I guess you have seen the worst during that time.
My father in law (born 1922 as my father) reports stories of an old man
who didn`t want to leave his property when Pforzheim was bombed.
He went in the top floor under the roof framework. each time one of the
smaller slow burning bombs came through the rof he would pick it up by hand and throw it out.
It seems that his building was one of the few which were not destroyed completely.

In the past until 1995 I have visted London quite regularly when we had good business relation,but that`s over meantime.
I like London a lot and I am thinking of taking a summer school at
Central St. Martins.. they offer a "total drawing" workshop which sounds great for me could be nice also to do outdoor work before or after the lessons. Yet I am undecided.. depends a lot on next years development.

Martin

Mikey
11-25-2004, 11:00 AM
Hi Martin,

I lived in Wood Green, North London, so we only had a few unused bombs drop on the way back from a raid. I do vaguely recall a few flying bombs going over, but no engine cut outs that I remember. When the siren went off we used to shelter in the cupboard under the stairs. I had a Mickey Mouse gas mask. I even tried it on once.

St. Martins has a good reputation and is just round the corner from the National Gallery and almost next door to the National Portait Gallery. Not bad, plus a specialist art book shop as well.

Hey Martin, now I have given my age away. I came into this world six months less a day after that darkness all began.

Mikey

Diyart
11-25-2004, 11:22 AM
Hi Martin,


Hey Martin, now I have given my age away. I came into this world six months less a day after that darkness all began.

Mikey

dear Mikey,
thank you for your opinion on CSM..it`s rather difficult to
judge those offers only via internet.

And yes sometime time seems to pass away quickly...I had my 50th birthday this month...

By the way : I think I have finsihed about 75% of the little booklet and I hope to send a Copy to RASG before Christmas attention Mike Fone. :wave:

Mikey
11-25-2004, 11:27 AM
Hi Martin,

Anthony Caro was a senior teacher if not head at St.Martins. He was never my kind of sculptor, but that may give you some idea of the prestige they have.

I'm looking forward to the book, although I'd best PM you my own address. Great to hear your progress is so fast.

Mikey

Diyart
11-26-2004, 03:35 AM
Hi Martin,

Anthony Caro was a senior teacher if not head at St.Martins. He was never my kind of sculptor, but that may give you some idea of the prestige they have.

I'm looking forward to the book, although I'd best PM you my own address. Great to hear your progress is so fast.

Mikey

Hello Mikey,

I haven`t heard about Caro at all.. maybe because I am not very familiar with
Sculpture at all :) .
I look forward to receive your PM,I am always a bit reluctant with too much
private info via the net in view of the risks possibly involved.

Martin

Mikey
11-26-2004, 09:49 AM
Hello Mikey,

I haven`t heard about Caro at all.. maybe because I am not very familiar with
Sculpture at all :) .
I look forward to receive your PM,I am always a bit reluctant with too much
private info via the net in view of the risks possibly involved.

Martin

Here's a link to our Anthony's resume. He seems to have slipped a bit in the rankings lately.
http://www.artfacts.net/index.php/pageType/artistInfo/artist/2144

The Slade as it was had been Britain top art school, but as I see it St. Martins wouldn't be that much far behind. Anyone who gets in there has a good start to their career as an artist.

Mikey