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HenrietteW
07-21-2013, 04:05 AM
"Not with a Bang ...", oil on linen canvas, 65x50 cm (25.6x19.7 inches). Another recycled canvas (yup - I do that a lot).
Opinions? Thank you in advance. :)


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Jul-2013/1090892-NotWithABang-2.gif

alangraham
07-21-2013, 09:05 AM
Hmm... Is the person sleeping and covered with a sheet/blanket? Tossing n turning perhaps?

birdhs
07-21-2013, 09:12 AM
my thought was someone who had died in their sleep, rather than "going out with a bang".

The golden figure in the background seems to have a grief-stricken face and demeanor.

altogether a very well thought-out and painted piece.

thanks for sharing this with us

greggo

HenrietteW
07-21-2013, 12:27 PM
Thanx for your comments. :) Interesting, Greggo, that you should see a second person there - I hadn't noticed myself. :D
As for the title: Is the name T.S. Eliot a hint? ;)

birdhs
07-21-2013, 12:30 PM
"This is the way the world ends, not with a bang, but a whimper."
T. S. Eliot

HenrietteW
07-21-2013, 01:12 PM
Precisely, Greggo. :)

Jon
07-23-2013, 08:32 AM
My very first impression was of a person on his or her death bed and I think the way you have positioned the arm is an interesting aspect as one wonders if it is in repose from lack of strength or a last outreach to someone unseen.

HenrietteW
07-23-2013, 09:34 AM
My very first impression was of a person on his or her death bed and I think the way you have positioned the arm is an interesting aspect as one wonders if it is in repose from lack of strength or a last outreach to someone unseen.

Sharp eyes, Jon. :clap: Yes, it is ambiguous - like the rest of life.

lobsterpot
07-23-2013, 10:01 AM
Henriette--Referencing a 20th C. literary giant in one's work is risky business since in this piece apparently you haven't done your homework regarding the line in Eliot's poem that you cite in your title.

It is not about dying in a hospice-like setting--but actually about Guy Fawkes who was caught attempting to blow up one of England's government buildings -this is the not with a bang- reference, and but with a whimper refers, possibly, to the sound Fawkes made when he was drawn, quartered, hanged and probably beheaded.

HenrietteW
07-23-2013, 10:44 AM
Henriette--Referencing a 20th C. literary giant in one's work is risky business since in this piece apparently you haven't done your homework regarding the line in Eliot's poem that you cite in your title.

It is not about dying in a hospice-like setting--but actually about Guy Fawkes who was caught attempting to blow up one of England's government buildings -this is the not with a bang- reference, and but with a whimper refers, possibly, to the sound Fawkes made when he was drawn, quartered, hanged and probably beheaded.

LOL - I know. However, I see no problem is using classic quotations to describe something else. :)

trufflecat
07-23-2013, 10:48 AM
Very moving piece. I had the same impression as others - someone sick and perhaps dying with the person in background very distressed about it. Great use of color and form, excellent piece.

lobsterpot
07-23-2013, 11:17 AM
LOL - I know. However, I see no problem is using classic quotations to describe something else. :)
Of course! Who cares what the poet actually meant? How many people in this age of all around dumbing down would notice your error anyway? LOL

HenrietteW
07-23-2013, 11:45 AM
Of course! Who cares what the poet actually meant? How many people in this age of all around dumbing down would notice your error anyway? LOL

No, that's not what I meant. My father was a professor in English and his absolute fav poet was T.S. Eliot. Hence, I knew about the background before applying that particular quotation as a title. Basically, I'm against explaining titles, but seeing as you seem bothered by this, I'll dive into it anyway. :)
I've seen plenty of dying and dead people and one thing I have noticed is that they often emit that little whimper when they go. It has always made a deep impact on me. Thus my father and I discussed how insightful Eliot's writings are and we both noticed the immense sadness that this particular quotation entailed. So ... my painting does not depict a bomb loving Brit being torn asounder ... but I can't help thinking of it every time I see someone die.
So .. that's why. :)
Btw - sorry if parts of this seem unintelligible for you - English is not my first language.

Jon
07-23-2013, 12:13 PM
LOL - I know. However, I see no problem is using classic quotations to describe something else. :)Absolutely!

mihaela
07-24-2013, 12:46 AM
Henriette, I love the poetry in this piece, I think you were very successful at suggesting the theme by providing just the right amount of information. I too see the golden figure in the background, which in my opinion brings even more mystery and dynamics (from an interpretation standpoint) to your piece. For me, this is a delightful rendering of memento mori.

HenrietteW
07-24-2013, 12:50 AM
Thank you, everybody, for your kind comments and support. I really appreciate any opinion you can offer. Cheers. :)

sidbledsoe
07-24-2013, 09:40 AM
It is great H! I wish I could come up with not only abstract art but also with titles that communicate and convey such truths about life.

HenrietteW
07-24-2013, 09:54 AM
It is great H! I wish I could come up with not only abstract art but also with titles that communicate and convey such truths about life.

Cheers ever so much, Sid - you're no slouch yourself, though. :)

birdhs
07-24-2013, 09:56 AM
My father passed like this about 30 years ago, at home, with most of us in another room, my oldest brother was by his side. he described that sound very much like a short exhale with the impression "life", as we know it, was escaping the body. Some believe it is the soul flying up to Heaven.

Your painting is all the more poignant for that reason, it made me remember him.

Thank you for that, it is not often when a painting makes such a personal connection

that is my definition of Fine Art...:music: :music: :music: :music:

greggo

HenrietteW
07-24-2013, 10:22 AM
Thank you, Greggo - that's about the biggest compliment you can give me. :)
Yes, that last sigh of life - the regret of what could have been, the sorrow of what was missed or the relief of interrupted pain.
I do believe in souls and I do believe they leave the bodies with that last whimper/sigh/exhale.

My father passed like this about 30 years ago, at home, with most of us in another room, my oldest brother was by his side. he described that sound very much like a short exhale with the impression "life", as we know it, was escaping the body. Some believe it is the soul flying up to Heaven.

Your painting is all the more poignant for that reason, it made me remember him.

Thank you for that, it is not often when a painting makes such a personal connection

that is my definition of Fine Art...:music: :music: :music: :music:

greggo