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jackiesimmonds
05-17-2013, 01:12 PM
I put this one into "talk" by mistake. If a Moderator picks this up, could it be moved please? thanks.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1317576

jackiesimmonds
05-18-2013, 02:50 AM
I did ask for the x-post to be sorted,but perhaps it has been missed.

this is the image......a foray into abstraction based on my woods series.

Interestingly, someone commented that it looked like I had been using the new Mount Vision set of pastels. fyi I hadn't! Which only goes to show that we get suckered into thinking there are new colours out there! I haven't bought any new pastels in years.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-May-2013/1805-abstract_woods_edited-1.jpg

crazywoman53
05-18-2013, 10:06 AM
I love the colors in this and the abstract lean. Coming from a landscape point of view though the only thing that bothers me is the strong V pattern you've created with the two stronger tree trunks. I've enjoyed viewing your forest series on your blog and hope your arm gets stronger soon. :)

jackiesimmonds
05-18-2013, 02:19 PM
hmmm- V shapes were deliberate. Made a nice change from pure vertical.
It was what I liked about the original scene, so I used it.
Too much, perhaps?

Donna T
05-18-2013, 03:59 PM
I like this a lot, Jackie. It hovers between reality and abstraction and keeps me interested. I hope to see more like this!

jackiesimmonds
05-19-2013, 02:54 AM
I really like the phrase "hovers between reality and abstraction" because that was EXACTLY what I wanted. So thanks for that Donna.

Am trying in a frame...simple white wooden box frame, quite deep, deeper than it looks here, it is 4cm deep. Like it?

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-May-2013/1805-woodland_abstract_framed.jpg

chuas2
05-19-2013, 10:46 AM
Frame is perfect, Jackie! Like a little jewel sitting in a satin (but not pink) box.
Kris

Donna T
05-19-2013, 10:47 AM
I like that look, Jackie. It really makes the artwork stand out without interferring in any way.

I found an article by artist Ken Kewley this morning and he says:

"I tend to like paintings where the abstraction is strong. By this I mean that the paint, the colors and shapes, are distinct, like strong actors in a play. Going towards abstraction does not mean going away from representation. It is more like describing something real by other means than illustration."

If you're interested, here is a link to the article (http://jssart.wordpress.com/interviews/ken-kewley-notes-on-color-painting/).

pastel65
05-19-2013, 01:06 PM
This is beautiful. :clap: Pam

jackiesimmonds
05-19-2013, 01:26 PM
I have been reading a book called "Realistic Abstracts" by Kees van Aalst.
He would, I think, have agreed with Ken Kewley.

He says " The technical skills required for the more realistic approach also serve as a firm basis for developing an abstract approach."

He makes the point that people do not experience reality in the same way. Everyone sees his or her own reality as a result of different experiences and different ways of processing them. He feels that many artists prefer suggestion to realistic representation...and I have always longed to move in that direction. I want to be more spontaneous, to combine reality and illusion; to draw subconsciously on my depth of knowledge and understanding of the main elements and principles of painting, yet then be able paint with fluency and freedom, in order to stimulate and excite my viewer. (and myself) I don't want to dot every i and cross every t - the camera can do that so much better than I.

Oscar Wilde said "Art only begins where imitation ends".

chuas2
05-19-2013, 02:38 PM
I have been reading a book called "Realistic Abstracts" by Kees van Aalst.
He would, I think, have agreed with Ken Kewley.

He says " The technical skills required for the more realistic approach also serve as a firm basis for developing an abstract approach."...

Along those lines I was having a FB "chat" with Casey Klahn, who said that all computer animators at Pixar attend a once a week life drawing class with a model, in order to hone/develop their drawing skills.

I've also heard that when the first American Photorealists were accused of not being able to draw (because they often traced projected images), Louis Meisel produced a show of superb drawings by photorealists.
:thumbsup:

and my husband (a drummer, heavy metal), told me that the majority of great rock artists have a solid background in classical music, and I know from experience that almost all professional dancers (including modern, jazz, etc.) have studied classical ballet. I guess it's that foundation thing that allows one the freedom to then take off in different directions.

allydoodle
05-19-2013, 04:45 PM
I love this Jackie, your color palette is wonderful. What attracts me most is the abstract quality, with just enough suggestion of the subject, it works so very well.

I read somewhere that the most appealing realistic paintings have abstract shapes incorporated in them. They might not be obvious, but after further observation the abstract shapes become a bit more apparent, only because you are looking for them.

chuas2
05-19-2013, 05:27 PM
I read somewhere that the most appealing realistic paintings have abstract shapes incorporated in them. They might not be obvious, but after further observation the abstract shapes become a bit more apparent, only because you are looking for them.

Not meaning to hijack Jackie's post, but Chris's remark made me think of Don Eddy, whose early realist works were masterpieces of composition and beautifully balanced shapes (masquerading as classic cars).

jackiesimmonds
05-20-2013, 02:05 AM
If any of you read my "crit" posts, you will know that I have a tendency to bang on about "underlying composition". That is, in fact, the abstract qualities which give the painting its structure. Without those, any painting is just a shopping list of objects, which sometimes, if you are lucky, sit together quite well, but more often than not, are not even considered in terms of having abstract qualities.

Those abstract qualities are things like LINE, SHAPE, MASS, DIRECTION, TONE, COLOUR, and many, many more. It takes time, however, for any artist to "get beyond" thinking about more than just the objects in the scene, the fruit, the plants, the trees, the buildings, and begin to think AS WELL about the underlying abstract qualities.

I like the phrase "early realist works were masterpieces of composition and beautifully balanced shapes - MASQUERADING AS CLASSIC CARS.

That's IT.

Theodorablau
05-20-2013, 03:30 AM
Ian Roberts says in his excellent book 'Mastering composition': 'A painting succeeds or fails because of its arrangement of major abstract value masses...The more engaging those abstract shapes in relation to the picture plane, the more engaging the painting.'

chuas2
05-20-2013, 12:31 PM
If any of you read my "crit" posts, you will know that I have a tendency to bang on about "underlying composition"....


I exchanged a couple FB messages with Kari Tirrell. In looking at some of her "scatter" paintings, suddenly I saw the strong compositional elements formed by shape, color, direction, etc. I made some comment about the underlying composition and she said she sometimes spends hours on composing a piece that ends up a "scatter."

But I think that's why her paintings work so well (or at least they do for me). It isn't a mindless jumble of props, but a very well thought out compositional structure. An eye opener for me!