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View Full Version : Our Prayers and Our Hearts Go Out to The People of Boston.


M.L. Schaefer
04-15-2013, 04:40 PM
On the news, the finish line of the Boston Marathon had two bombs explode, two bombs found, unexploded. About 3-3:30 Eastern Time.

Many people were injured, two dead.

My prayers are for the injured, the dead, and to all the people of Boston.

Margarete

At this time they do not know who placed the bombs. My thoughts are Domestic Terrorists.

WthrLady
04-15-2013, 05:17 PM
Unbelieveable!

Marcio C
04-15-2013, 05:37 PM
Yes, very sad. Such senseless, blind violence.

Yorky
04-15-2013, 05:49 PM
Shocking that someone could target the public at this event.

Doug

CharM
04-15-2013, 06:35 PM
This is so heartbreaking... my prayers are with all those touched by this terrible event... :(

LynnM
04-15-2013, 06:56 PM
So bewildering, thinking of those poor people.

virgil carter
04-15-2013, 07:07 PM
Amen. Sympathy and prayers to those affected and to their family and friends. There are some very dangerous people loose in this world.

Very best wishes,
Virgil

Europa
04-15-2013, 08:10 PM
Thoughts and prayers to all those affected by this terrible tragedy.


Pat xx

painterbear
04-15-2013, 09:20 PM
One of the two people who died in the explosions was an 8-yr old child.

How horrible are the people who planned this attack and carried it out. May they suffer the rest of their miserable lives with torments that can't be stopped.

Sylvia

laudesan
04-15-2013, 09:26 PM
:crying: I am speechless.. :crying:

JudyL
04-15-2013, 10:16 PM
:eek: Incredible horror, and amazing people helping the others. These horrible events also bring out the best in people.

hblenkle
04-15-2013, 11:44 PM
Shocking and unbelievable. Prayers and sympathy for those in Boston. I know others are thinking about what can be done to prevent such disaster at other marathons.

doppler
04-16-2013, 12:50 AM
There are no proper words for such evil.

Irishman
04-16-2013, 03:53 AM
Terrible

cloudchaser
04-16-2013, 06:04 AM
Mindless EVIL, what have they gained by it??

Tony.

DaveCrow
04-16-2013, 08:52 AM
http://www.weavenews.org/blogs/johncollins/9843/april-15-2013-day-bombs

Here is a very thought provoking perspective. My heart goes out to all.

olliewood0702
04-16-2013, 08:56 AM
Such a tradegy, evil lives among us. :(

Garden Maker
04-16-2013, 12:41 PM
Although there is no "bright side" to this tragedy, one thing to remember is that it probably only took a few people, maybe even only one, to carry this horror out, but hundreds turned out to help in the aftermath. The first responders, runners and bystanders, not to mention the hospital staff, EMTs, etc. As someone online said this morning, we outnumber them, always. There are more good, caring people out there than monsters. Hold on to that and don't let the monsters win.

kaypainter
04-16-2013, 12:52 PM
Words fail me. Disgusting.

K

Strawberry Wine
04-16-2013, 01:31 PM
Sharie, thank you for your thoughts and words. You are so right.

Never let the monsters win !

Gail

rickyhpierre
04-16-2013, 01:33 PM
Sheer wickedness. Needless senseless violence. My heart goes out to the people of Boston.

Ricky

clayville
04-22-2013, 05:13 PM
I'm not sure if this is of any interest to anyone here... but this is what the week felt like to me as a Boston resident:

On Patriots Day - one of our very own special holidays, here - Boston is never more diverse, with athletes and families from all over the world in town to take on our famed Heartbreak Hill and test themselves against one of the hardest courses there is, just as they have done for 117 years. Everyone who lives here has either run it themselves (not me, no way!) or has half a dozen or more friends who have run it at least once, often multiple times. The local holiday celebrates the ďShot heard 'round the worldĒ on Lexington Green (when the original Patriots began the Revolutionary War), and itís the unofficial beginning of local Spring with a traditional Monday morning-start baseball game at Fenway Park which lets out just about when the first elite runners are finishing down the street. Itís a true holiday here as well as Marathon Monday, with kids out of school and the daffodils and magnolia blossoms busting out all over town, the willows in the Public Garden just beginning to leaf-out. Itís a day freighted with local import, local pride, local traditions; a showcase to the world that Bostonians either embrace or flee in any given year. Sometimes we sit around the house eating waffles and watching the race on TV. Sometimes we finagle Red Sox tickets and then exit the game into the awe and circus of the finish. Sometimes we get out of town as we did this year.

My wifeís office is on the corner of Berkeley and Boylston Streets - within the perimeter of the crime scene this year, but in most years itís the Family Meeting Area: the place where runners can find their bags of sweatpants that have been ferried ahead, just two short blocks beyond the finish line. Iíve been down there in years past to watch the inspiring spectacle, and I've seen the exhausted and elated runners young and old stumbling, staggering or skipping into the arms of their loved ones or into the arms of waiting medical personnel ready to wrap them in space blankets. These professionals and volunteers offer hydration and massages, band-aids for their blisters, salves for their wounds, and they make sure the runners arenít beyond the limit of their endurance. They took on different duties this year, with different stakes.

The bombers knew quite well what they were doing, waiting for the first bubble of non-elite runners to hit the finish line. There were maximum numbers on the course, maximum families on the sidewalk, still enough media coverage beaming live all around town and capturing the chaos on film.

The full-bore coverage here had more than a few suspect tales circulating all week, unverified rumors bouncing off each other as in a hall of mirrors or an echo chamber, keeping the city on edge. It was strange to see the NY Yankees wrapping themselves in Bostonís tragedy, but then to have baseball stadiums around the country singing Neil Diamond's Sweet Caroline like we do in some sort of gesture of solidarity was stranger still.

This was school vacation week too, so Thursday I took my young sons to Minuteman National Park and the North Bridge in Concord to show them what Patriots Day is really about. I thought that might be a helpful way to move through Current Events and towards History. And it was. But it didn't last.


Friday here was just surreal, living in a major American city with completely empty streets, under total but voluntary lockdown while law enforement did it's work. After only a few hours we were desperate for relief from the tension, but also desperate for news - trapped in some strange limbo. All the true danger on the day of capture was five or six miles away from us, but still we stayed home and inside as requested. When it was finally Ďoverí, what I felt was not just relief, but a whole range of emotions: anger, pride, grief, sadness and weariness. Exactly a week after the bombing, we are still struggling to reclaim our normal routines.


Sidebar story:
Thereís a fellow who haunts my part of Boston, Carlos Arredondo, who lost a son in Iraq in 2004 and who actually set himself on fire in his own despair. He survived, and later worked as a peace activist. But he also drives around town towing a flag-draped coffin behind his truck sometimes. A few years ago, his other son committed suicide... so this man knows despair like none I will ever know, I hope. But he has also seemed to me from afar to be a one-man death cult, an unhealed and broken man, trapped in the limbo of his own grief. When the Newtown shooting happened, he took it upon himself to turn our local civil war memorial into a shrine to the kids who died in Connecticut, complete with little handmade white crosses above each laminated photo of each child - even the ones who donít share his faith.

On Marathon Day this year, he was waving an American flag near the finish line when the bombs went off. The "broken" man rushed into the smoke, pulled back the hurricane fencing, and used his bare hands to tourniquet the missing legs of Jeff Bauman, the man who lost them both, and likely saved his life. Iím glad I now know more about Mr. Arredondo even as I lament the circumstances. And I hope some healing comes after this for both of them. For all of us really.

-Clay

Yorky
04-22-2013, 05:40 PM
A moving first person account Clay.

Thank you.

Doug

D'Lady
04-22-2013, 05:49 PM
I'm not sure if this is of any interest to anyone here... but this is what the week felt like to me as a Boston resident:

On Patriots Day - one of our very own special holidays, here - Boston is never more diverse, with athletes and families from all over the world in town to take on our famed Heartbreak Hill and test themselves against one of the hardest courses there is, just as they have done for 117 years. Everyone who lives here has either run it themselves (not me, no way!) or has half a dozen or more friends who have run it at least once, often multiple times. The local holiday celebrates the ďShot heard 'round the worldĒ on Lexington Green (when the original Patriots began the Revolutionary War), and itís the unofficial beginning of local Spring with a traditional Monday morning-start baseball game at Fenway Park which lets out just about when the first elite runners are finishing down the street. Itís a true holiday here as well as Marathon Monday, with kids out of school and the daffodils and magnolia blossoms busting out all over town, the willows in the Public Garden just beginning to leaf-out. Itís a day freighted with local import, local pride, local traditions; a showcase to the world that Bostonians either embrace or flee in any given year. Sometimes we sit around the house eating waffles and watching the race on TV. Sometimes we finagle Red Sox tickets and then exit the game into the awe and circus of the finish. Sometimes we get out of town as we did this year.

My wifeís office is on the corner of Berkeley and Boylston Streets - within the perimeter of the crime scene this year, but in most years itís the Family Meeting Area: the place where runners can find their bags of sweatpants that have been ferried ahead, just two short blocks beyond the finish line. Iíve been down there in years past to watch the inspiring spectacle, and I've seen the exhausted and elated runners young and old stumbling, staggering or skipping into the arms of their loved ones or into the arms of waiting medical personnel ready to wrap them in space blankets. These professionals and volunteers offer hydration and massages, band-aids for their blisters, salves for their wounds, and they make sure the runners arenít beyond the limit of their endurance. They took on different duties this year, with different stakes.

The bombers knew quite well what they were doing, waiting for the first bubble of non-elite runners to hit the finish line. There were maximum numbers on the course, maximum families on the sidewalk, still enough media coverage beaming live all around town and capturing the chaos on film.

The full-bore coverage here had more than a few suspect tales circulating all week, unverified rumors bouncing off each other as in a hall of mirrors or an echo chamber, keeping the city on edge. It was strange to see the NY Yankees wrapping themselves in Bostonís tragedy, but then to have baseball stadiums around the country singing Neil Diamond's Sweet Caroline like we do in some sort of gesture of solidarity was stranger still.

This was school vacation week too, so Thursday I took my young sons to Minuteman National Park and the North Bridge in Concord to show them what Patriots Day is really about. I thought that might be a helpful way to move through Current Events and towards History. And it was. But it didn't last.


Friday here was just surreal, living in a major American city with completely empty streets, under total but voluntary lockdown while law enforement did it's work. After only a few hours we were desperate for relief from the tension, but also desperate for news - trapped in some strange limbo. All the true danger on the day of capture was five or six miles away from us, but still we stayed home and inside as requested. When it was finally Ďoverí, what I felt was not just relief, but a whole range of emotions: anger, pride, grief, sadness and weariness. Exactly a week after the bombing, we are still struggling to reclaim our normal routines.


Sidebar story:
Thereís a fellow who haunts my part of Boston, Carlos Arredondo, who lost a son in Iraq in 2004 and who actually set himself on fire in his own despair. He survived, and later worked as a peace activist. But he also drives around town towing a flag-draped coffin behind his truck sometimes. A few years ago, his other son committed suicide... so this man knows despair like none I will ever know, I hope. But he has also seemed to me from afar to be a one-man death cult, an unhealed and broken man, trapped in the limbo of his own grief. When the Newtown shooting happened, he took it upon himself to turn our local civil war memorial into a shrine to the kids who died in Connecticut, complete with little handmade white crosses above each laminated photo of each child - even the ones who donít share his faith.

On Marathon Day this year, he was waving an American flag near the finish line when the bombs went off. The "broken" man rushed into the smoke, pulled back the hurricane fencing, and used his bare hands to tourniquet the missing legs of Jeff Bauman, the man who lost them both, and likely saved his life. Iím glad I now know more about Mr. Arredondo even as I lament the circumstances. And I hope some healing comes after this for both of them. For all of us really.

-Clay

:crying: A very moving post. Thank-you!

ChristophS
04-22-2013, 09:09 PM
I'm rather new here but as New Yorker my heart goes out to you guys in Boston, we have our rivalry with sports but we are by each others side when it counts. :thumbsup:

It was also reported today the RCMP stopped a planned attack on Via Rail in Toronto, close call there. :eek:

These people are out there among us and it is really is a roll of the dice when we walk outside the door every morning, but as long as we stand together, and continue on with the one thing they hate about us the most; the way we live, they can't win. ;)

juneto
04-22-2013, 10:34 PM
New England needs all the prayers it can get and I add my own ,for all the families and children, hurt or lost as well as these boys who took the wrong direction .ruining their otherwise decent life here and their broken -hearted parents who have now lost 2 sons and don't understand why Either .So much sadness. :crying:
Happily, we have worked with our good ally CANADA to avoid another massacre there .:thumbsup: :thumbsup:
June:wave:

clayville
04-23-2013, 08:50 AM
Just after I posted the lengthy narrative above, I went out on an errand. And there was Mr. Arredondo, wearing the same cowboy hat he wore on Marathon day, setting up an improvized memorial near the same monument he has used in the past. Hastily snapped out my car window...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/23-Apr-2013/979306-CarlosCrop.jpg