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virgil carter
04-11-2013, 11:03 AM
This year's AWS exhibition is being shown at the Salimungundi Club in New York, as is their annual custom. The AWS web site doesn't show all the accepted entries, but does list the award winners and by clicking on their name one can see each individual painting selected by this year's award jurors.

I wish they would make a friendlier and easier interface to view all of the accepted entries (or at least the award winners), but with patience one can view the paintings one by one.

Go here: http://www.americanwatercolorsociety.org/a_awards.php?year=2013

They also have winners going back to around 2008 or so, for those wanting to study even more paintings.

It's a very, very hard show in which to get accepted, with more than 1,000 entries each year (only 1 painting per entrant) and approximately 100 or so finally selected. But it's a diverse and educational show to study watercolor painting. I'm told it generally takes one 5+ years of submitting paintings before one may (or in may case, may not) be selected.

Happy viewing--sling paint!
Virgil

Antiqueteacher
04-11-2013, 01:02 PM
Thanks, Virgil, I really enjoyed viewing these paintings!

Katherine

Scotslass
04-11-2013, 01:15 PM
Thanks for posting the link Virgil - I enjoyed the viewing too.
Suzanne

olliewood0702
04-11-2013, 01:37 PM
THey ALL are just stunning; what wonderful watercolors. Thank you Virgil for sharing this site.

clayville
04-11-2013, 01:41 PM
Thanks for that Virgil. Some truly excellent work that showcases the medium, and some that hardly seemed like watercolor at all! More urban scenes and alleys than I might have expected, and interesting to note the proportions of Signature Members, new Signature members and non-signature painters too.

Yorky
04-11-2013, 02:02 PM
Thanks Virgil, some wonderful work there.

Doug

noge
04-11-2013, 03:32 PM
:clap: :clap: :clap:
But we dont have similar in Europe :confused:

teaberry222
04-11-2013, 07:46 PM
Thank you for bringing that link to our attention. Loved looking at all the beautiful works....inspiring!

Mike3839
04-11-2013, 08:16 PM
Thank you Virgil, beautiful paintings, awe inspiring talent and skills.

Mike

graesea
04-12-2013, 02:36 AM
I click on the names and a screen comes up - just a grey blank screen and a close window option.

No paintings at all.

edit: if I right click it opens in a different tab...that's just silly

D'Lady
04-12-2013, 03:29 AM
I was a little disappointed with how little diversity there was. They all had a very similiar mood, IMO.

pjartwc
04-12-2013, 04:01 AM
Thanks Virgil - its always good to see what is winning awards each year. They all paint so large!!!!

Superturtle
04-12-2013, 06:10 AM
More urban scenes and alleys than I might have expected

I noticed this, too. Is everyone going to the same workshops? Say, Castagnet and/or Zbukvic? :)


All the work really is beautiful. Quite inspiring stuff. It's really nice to see what masters are capable of doing in this medium, and the range of styles.

juliet45
04-12-2013, 06:31 AM
Thanks for the link Virgil. There is some wonderful work. Is it pure watercolour only or water based paint including acrylic?

ona
04-12-2013, 07:32 AM
AWS includes acrylic too and opaque watercolours

'The Annual Exhibition is open to all artists working in water soluble media: watercolor, acrylic, casein, gouache and egg tempera on paper. Canvas is not accepted.'

thats why i prefer The transparent watercolor society of America. Some great paintings chosen for the awards though

painterbear
04-12-2013, 08:32 AM
Nice to see these noted artists paintings that were awarded prizes in the AWS show, Virgil.

Thanks for the info, Ona, perhaps it is time for them to change the name of the society to American Watermedia Society since they are accepting all those different forms of media that aren't Watercolor by any stretch of the imagination. After all, now there is water soluble oil paints too, why aren't they included???? :confused:

Sylvia

virgil carter
04-12-2013, 08:34 AM
Selected paintings, and particularly awarded paintings, are always a result of the jurors and their biases.

In the case of the AWS, they have 5 jurors. This year's jurors were: Sue Archer, Chair; Dan Burt; Bill Teitsworth; Joseph Zbukic, and James McFarlane, AWS President. Each is an accomplished painter and experienced juror. A Google search will confirm their painting knowledge and skill.

With over 1,000 entries to view, the first round at AWS is a screen shot of each entry, with jurors voting electronically to accept or not accept. I'm told at the end of the first round there were less than 20 that got a majority vote to accept. Thereafter, jurors may call back individual paintings seen previously for further evaluation and discussion. The end result was the 100+ paintings selected out of 1,000+, for this year's show.

This is a typical juroring process for a show this large and this prestigious.

All paintings are marked by technical excellence. In that sense, there is little diversity--they all are rendered with great skill. Selected paintings, and particularly award winners, have to have something greater than excellent technique.

What that something is, is a subject for useful exploration as a means to critique and evaluate one's own work. That would make a good discussion on WC someday. I'm pretty sure, however, that none of the painters of the selected work had to ask themselves "am I finished?" Their work illustrates they know the answer to when to stop painting.

The show and the juroring process illustrates one of the obvious principles for successful competitions: make one's painting immediately memorable and appealing, in one way or another. Blending with the herd is not a formula for consistently successful competitions--if that's one's goal.

Some paintings are obvious to all viewers as to who the painter is, due to their well-known style and approach to painting. Other paintings, of course, are not known to the jurors.

All of this said, it brings us back to the beginning--selections in any jurored show always represent the personal reactions of the jurors. If one wants to paint competitively, one understands and accepts the way the system works.

And keeps painting, painting, painting.

Sling it!
Virgil

ona
04-12-2013, 09:11 AM
There is so much beaurocracy and finance involved in changing a name Sylvia as well as the name itself being known for what it already is. Several of the top watercolour societies now accept acrylic too. Its only really TWSA and watercolor West that are pure transparent watercolor of the big internationals in the US. CSPWC here in Canada alternates each year between transparent watercolour just on paper and watercolour on canvas and other surfaces.

Thought you might find this interesting from the TWSA newsletter

TWSA 2013 Exhibition News



The 2013 TWSA Annual Exhibition once again received hundreds of entries. Our jurors, Robin Berry and Paul Jackson, spent many hours viewing and rating each painting on it's own merit. Their instructions were to rate on excellence regardless of subject matter. We think you will be amazed at this year's diverse and interesting show. Here is this year's breakdown of what we received:
Entries Juried in (first # those entered, 2nd # those accepted)

Abst/Nonrep- 28, 1
Animal- 48, 8
Architectural- 42, 4
Cityscapes- 62, 5
Figurative- 98, 9
Floral/Fauna- 68, 4
Groups- 23, 4
Interiors- 16, 4
Landscape- 82, 7
Mechanical- 27, 6
Nautical- 43, 2
Portraits- 77, 14
Still life- 47, 8
Water- 28, 5


From the results, you can see we had lots of people and animals. Secondly, there were plenty of land and cityscapes. In recent years, automotive and musical instruments were prevalent. This year, we had very few entered.

Twenty artists are first time juried in artists! There are six selected paintings that are resubmissions from 2012. Once more proving every juror has his or her own personal point of view. If you love your work and it falls into the prospective time frame, resubmit!!


Ona

Flattwo
04-12-2013, 09:12 AM
Hi

Thanks for the link

Some nice paintings, but I agree with Dragon Lady, too many urban scenes of a similar style, no real landscapes

I did notice that Ratindra Das's painting "Xizhou at Noon" in virtually identical in style to Frank Webb's entry, a lot of folk seem to copy his style

My favourite is "April in Central Park by John Salminen

Henry

sashntash
04-12-2013, 12:52 PM
I was just going to say.... Ratindra Das is one of my favorite artists.

Flattwo - while I agree that both Ratindra Das and Frank Webb paint what I call semi-abstracts and they both like vibrant colors, based on watching their DVDs dozens of times (I own one DVD of each artist), their working methods are totally different and I sincerely doubt that Ratindra Das was influenced by Frank Webb. But I don't know that, of course... just a guess based on watching both of them work.

There were several paintings amongst the winners that struck me as heavily influenced by Mr. Z. and Alvaro Casagnet....

virgil carter
04-12-2013, 05:59 PM
Sylvia and Ona make good points about the names of various art associations and how the technical aspects of various paint media have changed. I'm sure it must be a continuing struggle for the leadership of many of these organizations, trying to stay true to tradition, but also recognize and provide opportunity for newly emerging paint mediums.

Glad it's not up to me.

Sling paint,
Virgil

FLNH
04-12-2013, 06:10 PM
I will be in NYC on my way home from Iceland when the exhibit is open. Is the exhibit open to the public,,which is me in this case? I would love to go if possible.

virgil carter
04-12-2013, 08:36 PM
Yes, the exhibit is open to the public. Here's the web site with the information about the exhibit dates and hours in the lower left:

http://www.americanwatercolorsociety.org/

Sling paint,
Virgil

painterbear
04-12-2013, 08:57 PM
Sylvia and Ona make good points about the names of various art associations and how the technical aspects of various paint media have changed. I'm sure it must be a continuing struggle for the leadership of many of these organizations, trying to stay true to tradition, but also recognize and provide opportunity for newly emerging paint mediums.

Glad it's not up to me.

Sling paint,
Virgil

Virgil,
I understand about how things are changing in the art world all the time, especially as paint types have evolved. My point was, if the American Watercolor Society is prepared to accept all media that are water soluble, then they need to change their name to reflect that, no matter how well known they are under their original name. It is no longer valid....they are NOT the American WATERCOLOR Society, they are the American WATERMEDIA Society and they should be proud to acknowledge that change to their criteria. :angel:

Sylvia

virgil carter
04-12-2013, 09:36 PM
Sylvia, I understand your point. I agree that some of the titles of some watercolor organizations do not necessarily fully describe their policies.

Here's the definition of watercolor used by the National Watercolor Society, arguably the other major watercolor society in the U.S. besides the AWS:

"NWS ARTICLE X. DEFINITION OF WATERCOLOR
Section 10.01. A watercolor is aquamedia on paper which is unvarnished. The term "watercolor" shall be deemed to exclude work in encaustic or oil."

Thus it's easy to see where the Transparent Watercolor Society (TWS) has positioned itself, in comparison with other watercolor societies, as an advocate for traditional transparent watercolors. Their 2013 TWS prospectus describes "Requirements of paintings: Transparent watercolor applied in a transparent manner (emphasis added) on single sheet of 100% rag or cotton paper, free of pigment and/or embedded materials. Use of any pencil only for planning marks."

So for TWS, one cannot use cadmium or other traditional and commonly used opaque watercolors, no gouache highlights, etc., much less the use of major gouache or body color passages.

On the other hand, as Ona described, numerous watercolor societies, have chosen to retain their traditional name and recognizable trademarks, while at the same time modifying their painting eligibility requirements in their prospectus.

For example, the Philadelphia Water Color Society (I believe it may be the oldest in America) hosts its annual "Works on Paper" exhibition. Any media on paper is eligible for submission. Thus, they have dealt with the change in paint technology by keeping their founding name and changing the type of exhibitions they sponsor. It's just one way, but it's their way.

If some painters find the use of organizational titles confusing, they should simply carefully study the prospectus for programs of interest to understand what is acceptable media. After all, it's the painting that really matters.

Just my thoughts. Other's milage may vary.

Sling paint,
Virgil

FLNH
04-12-2013, 11:00 PM
Virgil, thank you for the information.

ona
04-13-2013, 05:38 AM
The Transparent watercolor society of America is TWSA Virgil, TWS is Texas Watercolor Society.

What really makes me sad is that many of the watercolour societies will accept most watermedia in their exhibitions but will not accept a traditional transparent watercolour on paper gallery wrapped without glass.

sashntash
04-13-2013, 07:38 AM
So for TWS, one cannot use cadmium or other traditional and commonly used opaque watercolors, no gouache highlights, etc., much less the use of major gouache or body color passages.


Sling paint,
Virgil

Virgil - you bring to my mind a question that I asked in the gouache thread but didn't get an answer.

A question of terminology.

Within "traditional" watercolors - there are both transparent and opaque colors.

Gouache is often referred to as "opaque" watercolor.

Body color generally means "traditional" watercolor paints with white added.

So..... my question is this......

I have always thought that "transparent watercolors" meant "traditional watercolors" including both transparent colors and opaques colors such as the cadmiums.

Most of the traditional English watercolorists used cads and their paintings, I believe, are considered "transparent watercolors."

We need new terminology :)

1) "Traditional watercolors" = transparent and opaque colors used in the traditional way

2) Gouache

3) Mixed watercolors - traditional watercolors plus gouache in the same painting

4) Mixed watermedia - any use of traditional watercolors and gouache and acrylics in the same painting...

For me.. the confusion arises when discussing opaque traditional watercolors (such as the cads), gouache and "body color."

:cat:

CharM
04-13-2013, 08:29 AM
Virgil, thank you for posting the links to the Show. The artwork, regardless of style or medium, is beautifully inspirational.

I may be odd man out here, but I applaud the Societies who are recognizing the need to move forward by expanding their acceptance of what's considered water media. At the end of the day, beautiful artwork is beautiful artwork.

But, know the rules. It's certainly important to read the prospectus when planning to enter any juried exhibition. Shows tend to "trend" based on the jurors' subjective selections. So, it wasn't a surprise that the paintings in this show all felt similar to some degree.

Perhaps separating water soluable from water reactivation might be a suggested division... That way, acrylics and oils would still remain on their side of the fence while watercolour, watercolour pencils and crayons and sticks, and gouache would come together on the other side... All these mediums are watermedia, but the second group would fall under a larger umbrella of redefined Watercolour.

This discussion is interesting and informative!

ona
04-13-2013, 08:46 AM
Susan, Transparent watercolour is usually done with transparent or semi transparent paints but you can use opaque paints if applied in a transparent manner ie by glazing in a thin layer but no white paint The white needs to be the white of the paper. This is the guidline set down by the Transparent Watercolour Society of America and Watercolor West both of which only allow transparent watercolours on paper.

I agree Char, its good that some of the societies move with the times but if they do this they should include all forms of watermedia on any surface not be inclusive to some and exclusive of others. Its nice too to have the traditional socities too that really promote true transparent watercolour.

sashntash
04-13-2013, 12:51 PM
ona - many thanks for the clarification :thumbsup:

It was the cads and their brethren that were puzzling !!

virgil carter
04-13-2013, 03:17 PM
Doesn't applying thin, diluted washes of opaque paints and/or using them to apply "transparent" glazes sort of defeat the whole purpose and value of opaque paints? Sort of an oxymoron: using opaque paints transparently!

I didn't read that definition about the use of opaques in their prospectus, but clearly you should know, Ona.

Seems like TWSA does its own brand of wordsmithing, IMO. Every organization has it's own culture, which is as it should be.

Work accepted by TWSA is very high quality and worthy of study.

Sling paint,
Virgil

ona
04-13-2013, 04:21 PM
Doesn't applying thin, diluted washes of opaque paints and/or using them to apply "transparent" glazes sort of defeat the whole purpose and value of opaque paints? Sort of an oxymoron: using opaque paints transparently!

I didn't read that definition about the use of opaques in their prospectus, but clearly you should know, Ona.

Seems like TWSA does its own brand of wordsmithing, IMO. Every organization has it's own culture, which is as it should be.

Work accepted by TWSA is very high quality and worthy of study.

Sling paint,
Virgil

A couple of people asked for clarification before the last entry date on Facebook Virgil. I only have a couple of opaques on my palette anyhow and only use them rarely but they do produce some fab effects when glazed....very different from what you can achieve with transparents and thats why i do use them occasionally.

Its amazing going to the TWSA exhibition. I hope to go again this year as my painting was accepted again but have to wait until I know the date of a procedure before i book the flight.

brusher
04-14-2013, 05:46 PM
Well I saw the show today; it is fabulous! So many great paintings. It is always inspiring - the lesson learned - more practice, work harder. As is often the case, I like the prizewinning paintings very much, but may "love" several others that did not win anything. but it just goes to show, that there is something for everybody. So many different styles, techniques and points of view. Wow - a lot of paintings of Times Square this year!