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mcknight
09-09-2003, 03:28 PM
MY IMAGE(S):
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/upload_spool/09-09-2003/1277_doug.jpg


GENERAL INFORMATION:
Title: newspaper sketch
Year Created: 2003
Medium: Oil
Surface: Paper
Dimension: 8X10 or something
Allow digital alterations?: Yes!

MY COMMENTS:
I visited MattV's site last night (by the way, impressive portraits) and discovered some great art links. Matt, thanks for sharing those links!

I was particularly interested in the process Morgan Weistling uses as shown in his demos.
<a href="http://www.morganweistling.com/">Morgan Weistling</a>

What's unique about his approach is he starts painting, in detail, a small area of interest and works outward from there. He recommends that others don't use the approach he takes, since it's "like walking a tight-rope".

It occurred to me that I've always used this approach when I draw, but always do the opposite when I paint (i.e. paint background to foreground to detail). I generally hate the start of a painting because I often find it boring outlining shapes roughly.

So I decided to try using Morgan's approach with this sketch. Saw Doug Gilmore's picture on the cover of the Toronto Star and figured it would be a good test of this process. I quite enjoy painting this way - it feels much less like work.








MY QUESTIONS FOR THE GROUP:
This sketch is really rough so I'm not too concerned about correctness. Any opinions about the process?

Ginette
09-09-2003, 03:38 PM
I used that approach in my very first drawing I did.
I did not know any better.
I started with an eye and worked out ward from there.

I think that approach is a bit more stressful, for lack of a better word.
But as with many things if that is what you do a lot you get better and better and it becomes a habit.

Generally I think the approach is not as important as the end result.

However the journey of creating is very important to me. I must find pleasure in it or my emotional equilibrium is off.

Ginette

artbabe21
09-09-2003, 04:18 PM
Originally posted by Ginette
I used that approach in my very first drawing I did.
I did not know any better.
I started with an eye and worked out ward from there.

However the journey of creating is very important to me. I must find pleasure in it or my emotional equilibrium is off.


yep...I did the same w/drawing and and painting---not sure why we decide theses ways in which to work...:)

YES! the JOURNEY......most important....

Glad it felt like less work Dave...;) Interesting colors!

mcknight
09-09-2003, 11:17 PM
Originally posted by Ginette
I used that approach in my very first drawing I did.
I did not know any better.
I started with an eye and worked out ward from there.

I think that approach is a bit more stressful, for lack of a better word.
But as with many things if that is what you do a lot you get better and better and it becomes a habit.

Generally I think the approach is not as important as the end result.

However the journey of creating is very important to me. I must find pleasure in it or my emotional equilibrium is off.

Ginette

Thanks for replying, Ginette. Personally, I find the process more "stressful" when working from background to foreground (assuming, in this case, that the center of interest is the foreground). The interest area becomes sort of second class at the start and there's some anxiety over whether it's going to suffer from spent energy.

mcknight
09-09-2003, 11:23 PM
Originally posted by artbabe21


yep...I did the same w/drawing and and painting---not sure why we decide theses ways in which to work...:)

YES! the JOURNEY......most important....

Glad it felt like less work Dave...;) Interesting colors!

Thanks for commenting. I'm looking to modify my mode of transportation, at least for some stuff.
Glad you didn't say "lovely" colours ;)

Helen Zapata
09-10-2003, 01:06 AM
That's the process I used to use in my huge macro oil flowers. I'd start at the most interesting place to me, bring it to as complete and perfect as possible, and then continue work it one petal at a time. I never lost interest in it, and the whole painting would be interesting and fun to do.

I haven't tried it with landscapes, which I've concentrated on over the past year. Maybe I'll try it! I definitely go through an UGH stage with every landscape.

I like this portrait. Interesting expression!

Helen

mcknight
09-10-2003, 11:08 AM
Originally posted by zapata
That's the process I used to use in my huge macro oil flowers. I'd start at the most interesting place to me, bring it to as complete and perfect as possible, and then continue work it one petal at a time. I never lost interest in it, and the whole painting would be interesting and fun to do.

I haven't tried it with landscapes, which I've concentrated on over the past year. Maybe I'll try it! I definitely go through an UGH stage with every landscape.

I like this portrait. Interesting expression!

Helen

Yeah, I'll have to try this with landscapes too. I think it would be a good approach, since with landscapes, the determination of a focal point sometimes gets deferred. Normally I don't do any detail until a layer or two is on canvas, but this method goes right there - wonder how things turn out when successive layers are used. Thanks for looking and commenting.

giniaad
09-10-2003, 12:08 PM
very interesting approach...
you have used it well

(love the colors...I'm ducking...;) )

I also think that using oils makes this approach
more viable
especially if mixed colors are used
rather than paints right out of the tube
(which almost never happens, for me, at least...mix everything)

With acrylics (drying time aspect)
and especially a larger piece
I find that working the entire surface
up at the same time and level
works best
that way I make sure to
put "that color"
around where it is called for
while I have it going...

at any rate...this approach seems to work well for you
and, as you said, is less stressful
so, by all means...continue!
the visual result is "right on"

Cheers!

jerryW
09-10-2003, 09:02 PM
I prefer to see a posting with the whole paper covered.

mcknight
09-11-2003, 11:31 AM
Thanks giniaad! For me, colours are always mixed since I generally only use 4 or 5 tubes of colour. I started with acrylics so I suppose that's where my old habits started. I'll try this more often and see how these things evolve when moving to completion.


jerry, I know this is your preference and your words about totality have always stuck in my head. Loosing that is probably my biggest concern with an approach like this.