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kate252
03-22-2013, 03:25 PM
i like this song- although its not technically ancient

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_UaHl3d8Rlg

share your favourite classical piece so i can get more culturally "aware"
:thumbsup:

WthrLady
03-22-2013, 04:16 PM
I love that one and pachelbel canon in D.

clayville
03-22-2013, 04:47 PM
Bach's Cello Suites. I could listen to them all day (and often do).

This version is wonderful, but faster than the Janos Starker recording I'm used to...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndCjqD2Kv2c&ytsession=0Xv0AhWgSDH9tMDaJjYclV0dTG1YDRxWn4mHhiZHdxDFqOhBinGC3nLg3Bm9844Vp5zErqk3KZXAuBkWmxTL2zKEkaroh8lcYvbMPc2GqdeyHwye5-fz2i4QmqfM6yYnwr2MM8VMkTax7PPPfrutb0bNoCu5kkPlPz1dUIERffRCtAD8VuSR30cDio9pKh7U85Pee73-OMeK74jnJFPjwFzOUmMTaKYcDdWhpkl8wG_RzI7-lOxaLxWo8vFqfJqpQCUpu_yTHD48wkah02CB75AIc_pWwrfMYWnlF03NbQXhwZz64mrrIhKEYO63qapqbPdgwOoFUDwZ4t5P9IMIXlZAaCsdhHbYQ6gUo1qNZd2ouL6iM_z8-QR7r-ORgz3mbwkR8Qld4DRFOqGbVT_Z5iuJDs2pNRM68gi2lHTBRbzg5VaMLpoEIxaX766E5ATn2sBp03V3cWo2qUtfZY8Wj0cWFTHdU8iMnLnwp8jEsOhYgm5soa_MITjTWq_v_nhd84e_GlfYE_K65Ce3duP2zm5mWYJerNbGogu5OF91qSrJBUXrFUMFOkne8VRWs81r3lExLGe_zII

Scotslass
03-22-2013, 06:09 PM
Are voices allowed?
Carmina Burana (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QEllLECo4OM) (it's long)
and, somewhat gentler, the duet from the Pearl fishers (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhG4dPN2Nhs)
Suzanne

shipbroker
03-22-2013, 06:11 PM
Bach's Cello Suites. I could listen to them all day (and often do).



I like the Rostropovich version myself.......however, to get me to sleep I use the Glass Violin Concerto No.2.......or any Baroque.

geoff

charliez
03-22-2013, 06:12 PM
Bach's Brandenburg Concertos...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jXKIy_2p5U

janinco
03-22-2013, 09:18 PM
I played bassoon in various orchestras and my favorite piece is Camille Saint-Saens' Danse Macabre:

http://youtu.be/YyknBTm_YyM

This is the Wikipedia synopsis:

According to legend, "Death" appears at midnight every year on Halloween. Death calls forth the dead from their graves to dance their dance of death for him while he plays his fiddle (here represented by a solo violin). His skeletons dance for him until the rooster crows at dawn, when they must return to their graves until the next year.

The piece opens with a harp playing a single note, D, twelve times (the twelve strokes of midnight) which is accompanied by soft chords from the string section. The solo violin enters playing the tritone (or "Devil's interval") consisting of an A and an E-flatóin an example of scordatura tuning, the violinist's E string has actually been tuned down to an E-flat to create the dissonant tritone.

The first theme is heard on a solo flute, followed by the second theme, a descending scale on the solo violin which is accompanied by soft chords from the string section. The first and second themes, or fragments of them, are then heard throughout the various sections of the orchestra.

The piece becomes more energetic and at its midpoint, right after a contrapuntal section based on the second theme, there is a direct quote played by the woodwinds of the Dies irae, a Gregorian chant from the Requiem Mass that is melodically related to the work's second theme.

The Dies irae is presented in a major key, which is unusual. After this section the piece returns to the first and second themes and climaxes with the full orchestra playing very strong dynamics. Then there is an abrupt break in the texture and the coda represents the dawn breaking (a cockerel's crow, played by the oboe) and the skeletons returning to their graves.

The piece makes particular use of the xylophone to imitate the sounds of rattling bones. Saint-SaŽns uses a similar motif in the Fossils movement of The Carnival of the Animals.

It's great fun!

Jan

Mayberry
03-23-2013, 12:08 AM
Sometimes I need to listen to Shostakovich, Symphony 11 "1905". It's rather dark. The 2nd movement is pretty intense. If you turn the volume up, it's like you're in the midst of a military massacre, which is what the symphony is about. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kBEwf_zdrnw

Hoplite
03-23-2013, 01:33 AM
Stravinsky's The Firebird - Esa-Pekka Salonen conducting the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra. I've gone to that performance four time now over the years.

Oh hey, a version by Salonen and the LA Philharmonic on YouTube - I think I'll sit down with my sketchbook and listen...

Doris345
03-23-2013, 03:03 AM
Grieg's Peer Gynt Suite.

But only the music -- I dislike the old Norwegian folk tale and Ibsen's verion of it.

ingegerd
03-23-2013, 08:07 AM
I'm very fond of this little piece by Alexander Rybak http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6TeR1Gtr4Js . He has an ability to mix different changes and I know of several who have started to listen to classical music because of him.

I also like the symphonies by Allan Pettersson very much, it's very powerful music. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KMG-QHu5QFs

This season the local symphony orchestra got a new conductor, Micheal Francis, this season, he said that "Eight Songs for a Mad King" by Maxwell Davis was what he most of all wanted to show the audience http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XEFaVbX5N7c
I found it to be very touching an memorable.

kate252
03-23-2013, 03:31 PM
I played bassoon in various orchestras and my favorite piece is Camille Saint-Saens' Danse Macabre:

http://youtu.be/YyknBTm_YyM

This is the Wikipedia synopsis:

According to legend, "Death" appears at midnight every year on Halloween. Death calls forth the dead from their graves to dance their dance of death for him while he plays his fiddle (here represented by a solo violin). His skeletons dance for him until the rooster crows at dawn, when they must return to their graves until the next year.

The piece opens with a harp playing a single note, D, twelve times (the twelve strokes of midnight) which is accompanied by soft chords from the string section. The solo violin enters playing the tritone (or "Devil's interval") consisting of an A and an E-flatóin an example of scordatura tuning, the violinist's E string has actually been tuned down to an E-flat to create the dissonant tritone.

The first theme is heard on a solo flute, followed by the second theme, a descending scale on the solo violin which is accompanied by soft chords from the string section. The first and second themes, or fragments of them, are then heard throughout the various sections of the orchestra.

The piece becomes more energetic and at its midpoint, right after a contrapuntal section based on the second theme, there is a direct quote played by the woodwinds of the Dies irae, a Gregorian chant from the Requiem Mass that is melodically related to the work's second theme.

The Dies irae is presented in a major key, which is unusual. After this section the piece returns to the first and second themes and climaxes with the full orchestra playing very strong dynamics. Then there is an abrupt break in the texture and the coda represents the dawn breaking (a cockerel's crow, played by the oboe) and the skeletons returning to their graves.

The piece makes particular use of the xylophone to imitate the sounds of rattling bones. Saint-SaŽns uses a similar motif in the Fossils movement of The Carnival of the Animals.

It's great fun!

Jan



you know i recognise this- "midsummer murders" the theme tune......

well- it sounds like it anyway
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvD73A9eXXk

kate252
03-23-2013, 03:34 PM
thanks for your input guys...but why such serious music?
i prefer happier stuff

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8TxWzvUPyKE

kate252
03-23-2013, 03:47 PM
OMG!!!!!

guys- listen to this!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qiWsUw_Q6O4

M.L. Schaefer
03-23-2013, 09:19 PM
I love all types of music! However, my favorite is the Blues.....which I consider "classic" in its own right. :)

BUT I thought I would share with you what I heard on the news this morning....That autistic children are being treated with music (through headphones) while they do healing and learning exercises....walking, balance, speaking, attention, and so on. Different types of music work on different parts of the brain. Through modern technology, they have been able to isolate the tones that work best, i.e., speaking or writing. The preferred music is classical, especially Mozart, because of the lows/highs in his compositions. Even Gregorian Chants are used in the healing process.

:clap: Margarete

Yorky
03-24-2013, 04:48 AM
Gershwin's "American in Paris".

Doug

shipbroker
03-24-2013, 06:58 AM
I love all types of music! However, my favorite is the Blues.....which I consider "classic" in its own right. :)

BUT I thought I would share with you what I heard on the news this morning....That autistic children are being treated with music (through headphones) while they do healing and learning exercises....walking, balance, speaking, attention, and so on. Different types of music work on different parts of the brain. Through modern technology, they have been able to isolate the tones that work best, i.e., speaking or writing. The preferred music is classical, especially Mozart, because of the lows/highs in his compositions. Even Gregorian Chants are used in the healing process.

:clap: Margarete

We have a long established Music Therapy Charity in UK which is at the forefront of such work.......any key to a problem is worth using.....

geoff

juneto
03-24-2013, 01:24 PM
I like any Verdi arias , I like voice , Bach's Jesu and Fugue and Toccata etc, Brahms , Bethoven, Russian ballads and French opera . piano viola .
We love all the Gilbert andd Sullivan . Also light opera like Candide Gershwin , etc.
We listen all day from morniing til night , have radios all over the house and statiions on the computer .
Huge CD collectiion ,always something new we never heard before .
Can you tell we love music ?
June:evil: :wave:

Captain G
03-24-2013, 07:12 PM
I love that one and pachelbel canon in D.


My favorite too. :music:

Irishman
03-26-2013, 03:58 AM
Andre Rieu - Il Silenzio

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4l3Rgq-L1M

;-)

Scotslass
03-26-2013, 06:27 AM
Gosh Larry - that is WONDERFUL! Thanks for posting
Suzanne

Irishman
03-26-2013, 06:43 AM
You're welcome Suzanne.Glad you like it

Marcio C
03-26-2013, 11:54 AM
Bach's Brandenburg Concertos...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jXKIy_2p5U
My choice too