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persim
09-09-2003, 08:05 AM
MY IMAGE(S):
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/upload_spool/09-09-2003/26950_alexmaleri1.jpg


GENERAL INFORMATION:
Title: Portrait of my son
Year Created: 2003
Medium: Oil
Surface: Canvas
Dimension: 40x50cm
Allow digital alterations?: Yes!

MY COMMENTS:
Just a portrait of my son

MY QUESTIONS FOR THE GROUP:
Give it some comment please!

Matt Sammekull
09-09-2003, 08:09 AM
The thing that first strikes me in this, is the same that strikes me with most attempts at portraits, even my own.

The lips... why paint them as they were two objects placed on the mouth? When they really are a part of the skin, the mouth... they just have a slightly different color and it's very own topography. Think ups and downs... in and outs...

Otherwise, - interesting perspective and focal point.

//matt

markr
09-09-2003, 09:40 AM
Originally posted by Matt V


The lips... why paint them as they were two objects placed on the mouth? When they really are a part of the skin, the mouth... they just have a slightly different color and it's very own topography. Think ups and downs... in and outs...

//matt
This is all good advice but I'm thinking this ... How many portraits of people have you seen wearing this expression more than 50 years old(the age of the portrait not the person being portrayed)? I mean I know you love his smile but if you really want to capture "him" in a lasting way, a whole new approach is in order. Degas captured a laughing woman only one time that I know of. If you capture him in a more self reflective (... you can do this and still have him at ease ...) state I think the overall effect will be much more "him" and much more lasting.
Thanks,
Mark

Matt Sammekull
09-09-2003, 10:05 AM
if you really want to capture "him" in a lasting way, a whole new approach is in order

Very true Mark.

I remember Zorn saying he would never portray someone smiling with an open mouth... claiming it to be a most unnatural expression.

However, not every piece you make must be a perfect one. Heck, I find only a small fraction of my production being "great". One must take what one finds in every experience, and grow on that. Feel good about the things you did well!

You obviously know how to handle the paint, which is more than most amateur painters. The rest will come as long as you work on it. To think will always be the most important ingredient!!!! To pay attention to every little detail, even before applying any paint to the canvas. It's hard... really hard.


//matt

persim
09-09-2003, 10:21 AM
Matt V:
Thanks for your suggestions, your right lips are hard to make.

markr:
You right, but as a learning process I did this, just to capture
him as a 5 year old happy boy. Anyhow thanks for your replies.

Phranque
09-09-2003, 10:40 AM
Originally posted by persim
as a learning process I did this, just to capture
him as a 5 year old happy boy.

And that you did. Why should everyone be portayed in the same way, perhaps this child happens to smile a lot, perhaps not but you, his mother, wanted to capture that youthfull happy grin. A moment in time. I like it and how the blue from his shirt is reflected onto his cheek and chin.
One thing that I would like to see is to have the background darker so there is not so much contrast with the shadow.
Keep up the good work!

shirleyq
09-09-2003, 09:15 PM
You have created a treasure that surely WILL be appreciated and admired in 50 years.:)

roberj
09-09-2003, 09:41 PM
Novel perspective, laughing with him from first glance, stark shadow throws off at first, but after review looks right, like pop art or ads from the late 50's.


Bob