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Quinacridone Gold
02-22-2013, 07:26 AM
I have a number of sketchbooks of different sizes, but my favourite is a small Moleskine watercolour sketchbook - the medium size (8" by 5") in landscape format. Small enough to carry but with enough space to make a picture. I thought I'd share some of the sketches from it. I use a limited palette of Daniel Smith watercolours.

The first is a couple of gum leaves I picked up in the Snowy Mountains, Australia, in 2010. I often paint these leaves. They change colours, get eaten by insects and become wonderful interesting challenges for watercolour.

Quinacridone Gold
02-22-2013, 07:30 AM
The next was painted the same winter. Most people were out skiing and I had a day to myself with this little specimen for company. An open fire, a little paintbrush and a few colours. Pleasant memories.

Quinacridone Gold
02-22-2013, 07:34 AM
This is a little study of a rose I found in the Blue Mountains. I have painted a lot of single roses. I love the fussiness of the leaves and petals, and the changes of colour in the stem.

Quinacridone Gold
02-22-2013, 07:55 AM
These 3 were done this week while away on a delightful trip up in the Hunter Valley wine area of New South Wales. I visited a vineyard where the owner had built many beautiful gardens and we spent a few hours sketching there. The rose was in a fragrant rose garden, the jacaranda seedcase was on the ground, and the quince was growing on one of the many fruit trees.

Studio-1-F
02-22-2013, 10:13 AM
Lovely! Thanks for posting! :thumbsup:

Jan

Joan T
02-22-2013, 11:20 AM
Oh, thank you for sharing some of your treasures with us. These are really lovely. I think your leaves and the roses are my favorites...or that seedcase.

DrDebby
02-22-2013, 03:20 PM
Awesome little paintings. What do you use in your limited palette?

Quinacridone Gold
02-22-2013, 07:12 PM
My limited palette is made up of
Buff Titanium
Hansa Yellow Medium
Quinacridone Gold
Transparent Pyrrol Orange
Quinacridone Violet or Quin magenta
Ultramarine
Cerulean
Jadeite (rather than phthalo green or viridian)
Green Apatite Genuine (or sometimes Undersea Green - I switch between the two - instead of sap green)
Goethite
Burnt Sienna
Bistre (premixed burnt sienna and ultramarine to make a deep slightly blue-grey)

Quinacridone Gold
02-22-2013, 07:15 PM
A couple more done with bistre, goethite and burnt sienna. Some studies on holiday at Vanuatu.

Quinacridone Gold
02-22-2013, 07:18 PM
This was a sketch that was the basis of a couple of full sheet paintings that I have posted elsewhere on this website - under 'Boyd's Rock Quartet III'. It was so peaceful sitting on the beach painting these rocks, that were painted by one of Australia's favourite artists, Arthur Boyd, many, many times. The water, where it met the sand I was sitting on, was gold. Gorgeous.

Quinacridone Gold
02-22-2013, 07:23 PM
This was closer to home - a little plein air excursion at a local bay. I love the texture of rocks. And can't resist interesting leaves...

DrDebby
02-22-2013, 09:34 PM
What stunning paintings. I'm inspired to try harder with watercolor.

JennyMK
02-23-2013, 12:29 AM
What wonderful pages! They are all so beautiful!

Carole A
02-23-2013, 01:13 AM
You are indeed an inspiration. I love your little treasures that you have painted, the imperfect leaves, the stones and shells. I look forward to many more.

Carole

Quinacridone Gold
02-23-2013, 01:45 AM
Thank you for the lovely comments. I really enjoy working small and from life at times, and focusing on just one object. Here are some more leaves. One is yet another gum leaf, the other if both sides of the one long leaf I found in Vanuatu. I loved the completely different colours of the two sides.

Quinacridone Gold
02-23-2013, 01:49 AM
What stunning paintings. I'm inspired to try harder with watercolor.

That would be a wonderful outcome. I simply adore watercolour. It is so portable, so flexible, so lovely to use. You don't need a lot of brushes or colours or gear to get going and I have a little watercolour kit, pocket moleskin and travel brush with me at all times...just in case.:)

ccoppola82
02-23-2013, 03:50 AM
these are fantastic. I'm particularly drawn to the leaves. Really well done

MartinaL
02-23-2013, 05:01 AM
Absolutely beautiful sketches! Wonderful!
I agree with you, watercolor is a fantastic medium for sketching!

Martina

bookscorpion
02-23-2013, 11:32 AM
I really enjoyed looking at all the painting in this thread, they are beautiful.

Joan T
02-23-2013, 01:21 PM
I'm loving all your leaves!!! The shells are great...you used some great granulating colors in those that made them look sandy. Great job!

DrDebby
02-23-2013, 04:35 PM
Marvelous leaves.

poochemio
02-23-2013, 08:36 PM
Hi Jane. Wonderful sketchbook, I've enjoyed reading your posts over in the watercolor forum. Such wonderment from a small palette.

Quinacridone Gold
02-23-2013, 11:09 PM
A little flower study. These guys come out in the sunshine and close up in the dark.

Quinacridone Gold
02-23-2013, 11:12 PM
By the beach on an overcast day, between showers.

Quinacridone Gold
02-23-2013, 11:17 PM
Hi Jane. Wonderful sketchbook, I've enjoyed reading your posts over in the watercolor forum. Such wonderment from a small palette.

Thank you Margo.
You don't need many colours if you get the right ones, but I do use a much bigger palette for my large paintings. Not so much to create the hue, more to get the granulation that I love.

RainySea
02-24-2013, 02:17 PM
oh, wow, such a beautiful delicate work on that flower. Love it.

DrDebby
02-24-2013, 03:41 PM
That flower is gorgeous. A beautiful moody beach scene.

Marmsk
02-24-2013, 05:55 PM
Beautiful work making a super collection of water colours in your sketchbook.

CandAlArt
02-24-2013, 06:28 PM
Beautiful work. I do love your choice of colors in your palette, so perfect for leaves, flowers and other bits of nature.

Terry Wynn
02-24-2013, 09:49 PM
Your sketchbook is wonderful. I especially love the leaves, your renderings are so delicate and the palette is perfect.

I went to your blog and much enjoyed your generous tips and information.

Looking forward to seeing more.

Terry

Brindle
02-24-2013, 10:37 PM
Your sketches are fantastic, especially the leaves. Our palettes are very similar. I just couldn't live without Buff Titanium :P I like the idea of your Bistre custom mix!

Quinacridone Gold
02-25-2013, 01:10 AM
Your sketches are fantastic, especially the leaves. Our palettes are very similar. I just couldn't live without Buff Titanium :P I like the idea of your Bistre custom mix!

Thanks. I find I end up wanting Buff Titanium even if I reduce to 7 or 8 colours. It does so much, and with granulating Goethite, it renders beaches, shells, rocks and so on so readily.

The 'bistre' is brilliant - it saves all that mixing time, and can be used to lightly sketch a painting, very diluted, before you even start instead of a pencil, or at the end for the strong shadows. And it shades other colours if necessary, especially the greens. Anyway, I put it into all my students' palettes to keep them away from blacks or paynes grey and it works a treat. I mix it to just a blue side of grey - seems more useful that way - stir it well and let it dry.

What are your other colours? I do change mine around at times - I am about to try W & N Quin Magenta as my cool red. I am also going to give M Graham Quin Rose a go (not easy to get in Australia) - apparently it is a very red version, but usually I stick with Daniel Smith.

Brindle
02-25-2013, 12:16 PM
Thanks. I find I end up wanting Buff Titanium even if I reduce to 7 or 8 colours. It does so much, and with granulating Goethite, it renders beaches, shells, rocks and so on so readily.

The 'bistre' is brilliant ... I mix it to just a blue side of grey - seems more useful that way - stir it well and let it dry.

What are your other colours? I do change mine around at times - I am about to try W & N Quin Magenta as my cool red. I am also going to give M Graham Quin Rose a go (not easy to get in Australia) - apparently it is a very red version, but usually I stick with Daniel Smith.

I have been fickle about colors in the past but have finally settled on these 10 in my sketch kit:

Buff Titanium (PW6)
Permanent Yellow Light (PY155)
Quinacridone Gold (PO49 -- the "real" one)
Lukas Red (PR254) or Permanent Red (PR242)
Magenta (PR122)
Maroon Perylene (PR179)
Indanthrone Blue (PB60)
Cyan (PB15:3)
Cobalt Turquoise (PG50)
Pthalo Green (PG7)

I am going to ditch the PG7 in favor of an indigo mix like your "bistre". I keep thinking I want to ditch the warm red for Burnt Sienna Deep (PR101) but reality is, I can mix a pretty nice alternative from PO49 + PR179 so it seems a waste of space. And I can't really mix a good saturated warm red alternative from the other colors on the palette. In any event, this palette is definitely intended as a mixing palette and the colors were chosen to that end. I really enjoy the process of observing a color in real life and then trying to figure out how to mix it.

Incidentally, PG50 is a wonderful color ... great for bright blue skies and offers granulating pastel mixes similar to PW6 but in green, blue or purple tones that are just gorgeous.

vhere
02-27-2013, 04:19 AM
beautiful

Quinacridone Gold
02-27-2013, 05:04 AM
Hi Brindle
That's an interesting palette - really strong blue, deep crimson/maroon and quin gold is an amazing 'primary' mixing triad - your paintings must have some oomph. Or a CMY triad if you want. Nice. I tend to paint so much natural stuff that I like to have an earth colour, and wouldn't want to drop Burnt Sienna, even though it can be mixed. I am less of a fan of PR101 'cos of the opaque and sometimes 'dead' look it can have and it doesn't like mixing with Ultramarine, my main blue.

You can mix a pretty bright red with the magenta (assuming it's W & N - almost a pink?) + quin gold can't you? If you want to drop the warm red.

I've sampled a little Cobalt Turquoise and agree it's a gorgeous colour.
I love granulation. I haven't used it for any paintings though - just one of those DS 'try it' dots! I'll have a look at your website to see what you do with it...

I am always fascinated by the colours people choose. Everyone's choice depends so much on what you are going to choose to paint with them.

Scattykat
02-27-2013, 06:38 AM
yum - what a scrumptious journal, love your work, cannot pick a fave, they are all super, thanks so much for sharing these delights...

Brindle
02-27-2013, 07:58 AM
Jane: color choices ARE an addiction, LOL! Yes, this palette mixes brightly but the buff titanium and cobalt turquoise can knock things down back into "earth tone" territory which I guess is why they are so useful. I can mix a gigantic range of greens and browns with this palette. I have many "colorplay" sketchbooks filled with nothing but blobs of mingled paint, transition exercises, value studies, etc. It is by doing that that I've managed to come round to these choices but as my earlier comment indicates...there is no such thing as a "be all, end all" selection when it comes to pigments!!!

Quinacridone Gold
02-27-2013, 03:42 PM
I agree! I don't know if you have seen the poll I started, well two actually, on 'just 6 colours' or '12 colour palette' in the learning zone. I have had a careful look at the palettes others have chosen and it's great to get fresh ideas. You play around with your own studies then see someones else's favourites and play around again to see what they can do. Peryleen Maroon comes up a lot by the way. I have it, but it hasn't worked into a fav yet. If I need that hue I mix crimson (of whatever form) and Jadeite in my limited palette. Lovely for painting apples though, and some sorts of pears.

Brindle
02-27-2013, 05:24 PM
Yes, I responded to those polls :) I don't paint too much with Perylene Maroon by itself but as a mixer of smoky violets and subdued oranges and dull reds and rich browns, it is awesome.

JTMB
02-27-2013, 07:05 PM
I missed the start of this thread, but just went through it all - gorgeous work! Your botanicals are really well done.

thevaliantx
02-28-2013, 04:37 AM
Jane, I can't tell if you sketch before painting. Do you? If so, please forgive my poor eyes. It's their fault, I'm just the messenger. :lol:

Quinacridone Gold
02-28-2013, 07:36 AM
Yes thevaliantx, I sketch lightly in pencil to get the proportions. You wouldn't see it though however good your eyes 'cos I go back into the drawing with a very fine line of diluted colour, correcting if needed, and then erase the pencil. There will be some spots where the painted line will have crossed the pencil so it won't erase, but they get lost in the paint anyway when I paint in the colours.
Sometimes I do a more finished pencil drawing and just add a wash, or pen and ink with a wash, but I haven't posted any of those.

eyepaint
02-28-2013, 11:08 AM
Gorgeous gorgeous gorgeous!

(By comparison my works look like they were drawn by a five year old.)

Quinacridone Gold
02-28-2013, 03:46 PM
Gorgeous gorgeous gorgeous!

(By comparison my works look like they were drawn by a five year old.)

LOL - you must know some very sophisticated 5 year olds! Your layouts and economy of line are great!

Quinacridone Gold
02-28-2013, 03:51 PM
Another beach scene, this time at Balmoral Beach in Sydney

DrDebby
02-28-2013, 03:55 PM
Lovely beach scene.

Quinacridone Gold
02-28-2013, 03:57 PM
The next ones are from my smaller pocket Moleskine watercolour sketchbook. More leaves! But they do make themselves so available!

Quinacridone Gold
02-28-2013, 04:01 PM
And a feather from the little pocket book.

DrDebby
02-28-2013, 04:24 PM
Your leaves are fascinating. Love the feather.

Dragoon
02-28-2013, 04:25 PM
Stunning!

What makes them look real (besides great rendering skills!) is that little sliver of shadow...funny how that little detail makes all the difference!

Is the feather done in graphite? Or your 'bistre' colour?
I'm thinking of making a pan of it...do you just squirt into a half pan and mix with a toothpick?

I visited your blog, and wow!! your works are amazing!
And you are a colour EXPERT!

Thanks so much for sharing!
D.

Quinacridone Gold
02-28-2013, 07:43 PM
Hi Dragoon
The feather is in 'bistre', nothing else. Painted with a travel brush. My favourite of those, by the way, is the gorgeous Isabey 6202 squirrel quill - beautiful for fine lines and detail though of course best for smaller works. Like these!

To make my bistre, squeeze an equal line of each of Burnt Sienna (PBr7, not a mixture - they tend to have yellow and won't work) and Ultramarine (PB29) into a pan and stir really well. A toothpick is perfect. Then test it with a brush and water for colour. You can choose to make it neutral grey, slightly brown or slightly blue - I opt for just slightly blue (but not as blue as an indigo) as it works so nicely for shadows. Then let it dry and you are set - instant dark!

The other thing I do, by the way, is only partially fill my pans or half pans, just at one end, so there is space to mix a little wash in the pan. It seems most people fill them right up so I'll post a picture to show you what I mean. It gives a little more mixing space and I suppose keeps the travel palette lighter! I let them dry tipped on an angle. One picture is half pans in my tiny travel palette that I use for most of these sketches, the other is an even smaller 'just 6 colours' one with full pans, both with Bistre.

(also by the way - I have sprayed the inside lid of these little palettes with white enamel paint since these photos were taken. Much better for mixing!)

Dragoon
02-28-2013, 10:38 PM
That is a very cool idea! Thanks for the tips and photos!

Now I'm smacking my forehead for not thinking of it, since I always like it when the pan has a dip in it, and a puddle of paint forms for dipping into...

Sorry for bothering you with all the questions, but did you study botanical art at a school, or learn by yourself with books, or ?

Your sketches have that professional look to them that I'd LOVE to acheive someday! (Like, about 10,000 hours of brush mileage away for me...)but still, something to aspire to!
Thanks,
D.

PS, Oh, and do you ever cave into the urge to use brighter colours than what you see, or do you try to be 'accurate'?

Quinacridone Gold
03-01-2013, 12:34 AM
Hi again - no problem! I love the little tips we can pick up on WC that we didn't think up ourselves. My favourite is from someone who posted that you can remove the stain of phthalo colours from your palette with a tiny touch of vegetable oil on a paper towel. Brilliant. So simple - better than trying to use the slightly greasy finger. But someone else took the time to share.:thumbsup:

I didn't study botanical art at all but started painting flowers and birds in watercolour as a teenager with my first little W&N sketch palette that I bought at the age of about 14 or 15. I've been doing it a long time, and have always drawn and loved detail. I'll post my first bird - perhaps my first watercolour? I have other early work if you are interested.

I did my first commissions at 16 - large detailed paintings of plants and line drawings of massive flower arrangements. I think I was paid pittance for them! I'll post a detail of a protea I did at the same time - pen and ink with a tiny bit of colour inside.

I did specialise in etching in my visual arts degree, which features line work, which I obviously loved, but my watercolour is all 'self taught brush miles'. Lots of them, and an almost scientific approach to testing out how colours react with each other.

As for colour - I generally do go for realistic colour if I am doing natural objects, so don't go in for colours I can't see, but am happy to add brighter backgrounds to a featured flower or exaggerate a landscape at times. I have posted a couple of larger paintings elsewhere with exaggerated colour.

In my abstract work I do go more wild. It is on my website - not quite appropriate for this sketchbook thread.

poochemio
03-01-2013, 12:37 AM
Ah, the oil on the palette trick, I forgot that and used pthalo for the first time ever, wasn't blown away by the color but was positively indignant that is stained a brand new palette. Thank you! This protea is from when you were 16? Awesome.

Quinacridone Gold
03-01-2013, 12:50 AM
Ah, the oil on the palette trick, I forgot that and used pthalo for the first time ever, wasn't blown away by the color but was positively indignant that is stained a brand new palette. Thank you! This protea is from when you were 16? Awesome.

I can understand that!
No I am not blown away by the colour of either phthalo blue or phthalo green - but I do like phthalo blue Red Shade - it's quite gorgeous. But great to be able to get rid of it all too!

(and yes, I was 16. I did a whole series of botanical paintings and would have been 17 by the time they were finished though. You can see why I took up etching....)

Quinacridone Gold
03-01-2013, 12:53 AM
Here's another more recent one with a bit less 'local colour'. A friend's son gave her the flower so I painted it in my little Moleskine. Not exactly wild though:(

bookscorpion
03-01-2013, 04:12 AM
So many gorgeous sketches. The thistle (?) is my favourite, All those details would drive me nuts. And thank you for answering all those questions, I learn a lot just reading this thread.

vhere
03-01-2013, 04:22 AM
lovely work

I adore pthalo blue and green! they are 2 of my must-have colours - perfect for catching the colours of the sea in Cornwall. I've just added Cobalt Turquoise light for the same reason. They make wonderful mixes as well.

I hadn't heard the oil trick - a useful one to know. I do clean oil paint or acrylic or charcoal that's ingrained, off my hands with baby oil though and clean my brushes with cheap cooking oil. Environmentally friendlier and kinder to the skin.

Brindle
03-01-2013, 07:34 AM
Really enjoying this thread! I love that idea of "brush miles" in terms of increasing skills. There's no other way, really, is there?

Jane, you've inspired me to put together a tiny palette with just the primaries, using your "bistre" as the warm blue. I love the idea of tipping the pans so that there is a mixing space in one end after the paint sets up. I have been using bottle caps from waterbottles as pans because the round shape means smaller point of contact for adjacent pans and thus less cross-pollution when pulling color out with a brush from one of them. It also tickles me how clean your pan colors are. I keep mine that way too, even after long use of a particular watercolor box, and my fellow artist friends like to tease me about that. :P

DrDebby
03-01-2013, 01:31 PM
I'm in awe of your exacting detail at the young age of 16/17. I've got a lot of miles of lines and brushes to get anywhere near that. The drawings are all just so lively.

Quinacridone Gold
03-01-2013, 05:27 PM
lovely work

I adore pthalo blue and green! they are 2 of my must-have colours - perfect for catching the colours of the sea in Cornwall. I've just added Cobalt Turquoise light for the same reason. They make wonderful mixes as well.

I hadn't heard the oil trick - a useful one to know. I do clean oil paint or acrylic or charcoal that's ingrained, off my hands with baby oil though and clean my brushes with cheap cooking oil. Environmentally friendlier and kinder to the skin.

I also love the colours, but find limited use for them en plein air. In Australia, the sky tends to be almost purple so ultramarine, sometimes with a touch of rose, depicts it best. Sometimes some cerulean can be useful, at the moment with all the rain we are having, grey (bistre) will do it! Our native plants are largely dull greens, best made with Ultramarine again with a warm yellow or even burnt sienna, so once again, no need for Phthalo blue.

If I were painting the reef or underwater, then I'd grab them though. I did one painting of a waterlily with layers and layers of phthalo blue to depict the depth of the water. If I need to depict water with my current sketch palette I use cerulean with a touch of Jadeite, which is also a lightly blue-green, but with massive granulation possibilities.

I do use phthalo green to put crimson red into shadow for painting red flowers too, so I certainly have it. And I use Sap Green (phthalo green + quin gold) as a convenience green at times too, so I haven't banned them by any means, just not in my travel sketch palette.

One day I'll get to Cornwall, and may well take different colours to paint it!

And agreed about oil paints. I find that if I wipe as much paint off as I can on newspaper or paper towels, then use vegetable oil to clean them, then Old Masters brush cleaner to remove the oil and condition them, my brushes are fine and so am I! Liquin is my only medium and I try to paint outside to avoid any other fumes.

Quinacridone Gold
03-01-2013, 05:43 PM
Really enjoying this thread! I love that idea of "brush miles" in terms of increasing skills. There's no other way, really, is there?

Jane, you've inspired me to put together a tiny palette with just the primaries, using your "bistre" as the warm blue. I love the idea of tipping the pans so that there is a mixing space in one end after the paint sets up. I have been using bottle caps from waterbottles as pans because the round shape means smaller point of contact for adjacent pans and thus less cross-pollution when pulling color out with a brush from one of them. It also tickles me how clean your pan colors are. I keep mine that way too, even after long use of a particular watercolor box, and my fellow artist friends like to tease me about that. :P

Thank you Carole. I often talk with my students about 'brush miles'. We can learn with every stroke we make so the more the better. I think I heard that it takes 10,000 hours to become a master of anything, so I guess 10,000 brush miles would do it! And enjoy the mini palette when you make it up.

I am so often amazed at how grubby watercolourist's allow their palettes to get, and they still make great paintings. I like to clean them up carefully after I finish each painting - it's so much more inviting for when you start the next one! But I also just love the look of the colours :)

Quinacridone Gold
03-01-2013, 05:48 PM
Some more leaves. Painted on a beach in Indonesia.
These are from a different sketch book so the paper was not as nice to work on.

JTMB
03-01-2013, 06:18 PM
Beautiful work here! The feather just looks so soft and light the way you've drawn it - tough to get that effect.

DrDebby
03-01-2013, 07:39 PM
Just love all your leaf paintings. I'm inspired to find leaves and it's the dead of winter still where I live. The fall leaves are disintegrated and the spring leaves aren't here yet. :(

Dragoon
03-01-2013, 09:52 PM
LOL at your comment, Debby! Betcha lots of lurkers out there want some leaves, too, and can't find any!
But I have some!
I had picked up some interesting leaves in the fall, set it on my shelf and forgot them without drawing them. Hence my question about rendering something and just inserting 'better' colours. They are pretty dull now...

Thanks for posting your first bird, Jane! Now that's about where my painting ability is at..:thumbsup:

Edit to add: That dried bud is absolutely amazing! You have a good eye for detail and a steady hand!! And just think, you've gotten even BETTER than this over the years...wow, very humbling for me to think on...kudos to you!

Oh my goodness, did you mention dirty palettes? The horror(!) I feel when I see some of the sickly, grubby, smudgy palettes out there! There is a thread on WC something like, "Let's see your palette", and some peeps are PROUD they don't clean them! And they do fantastic work! And yet you can barely tell where the yellows and reds are because all the wells are scummed over with brown???? (Yes, I'm a bit O/C with neatness...)

I have an older watercolour book that shows the artist's palette, and its like, all brown and stuff...I'm like, what is THAT?? MOLD in the corners??...and I laughed till I cried...

I've had to slowly accept that grubby WC palettes is the norm, and that mixing areas at least, should not be cleaned or you lose perfectly good paint...:lol:
D.

Quinacridone Gold
03-03-2013, 08:25 PM
Just love all your leaf paintings. I'm inspired to find leaves and it's the dead of winter still where I live. The fall leaves are disintegrated and the spring leaves aren't here yet. :(

We never have no leaves in Sydney. Here are some you might like to try! They are scanned, so no shadows, but some lovely colours and shapes....I can't post if any bigger though...

DrDebby
03-04-2013, 03:14 PM
Oh my goodness! Those leaves are beautiful. Thank you so much. :D

Quinacridone Gold
03-04-2013, 04:20 PM
They are mostly gum leaves. Don't they have 'paint me in watercolour' written all over them?

Carole A
03-04-2013, 06:29 PM
I continue to be blown away by your sketchbook. And, by the tips, color recipes, etc. The notepad by my computer has a shopping list that grows with each post. I, too, have a large supply of leaves picked up on my morning walks that I need to get busy on. Some are leaves that I picked on a freezing day in high desert country and mother nature had preserved them in a metallic bronze, ginkgo leaves that my grandkids and I gathered after I took them out for a birthday dinner in September - turned gold. And I have a jar full of feathers also collected during walks. There's no shortage of material here - just energy.

Please continue with the inspiration - I'll get there one day.

Thanks so much for sharing.

Carole A

vhere
03-04-2013, 06:35 PM
These paintings are lovely.


I always get my students doing leaves and feathers at some point in the autumn term. It's such good practice for observation, colour mixing and portraying texture. I usually join in.

I think you would love Cornwall. Lots of sketches and paintings done there on my website and blog. I lived there as a child and would move back there tomorrow if I could. When I win the lottery .....

Quinacridone Gold
03-04-2013, 11:05 PM
Thank you Carole. Finding the time can be the biggest challenge of course, but having the items at the ready for when you do get an hour to yourself is a great help.

I am sure I would like Cornwall Vivien. I did a painting for a book illustration of a tree somewhere in Cornwall once. My dream is to spend some time each year teaching workshops and sketching in different locations around the world.....wouldn't that be gorgeous! I loved your work on your website, by the way. You have a personal interpretation whereas I am very literal with the landscape. Good on you.

MartinaL
03-05-2013, 04:48 AM
Absolutely fantastic sketches! I love the leaves, it is always fascinating that each one is different, even if it comes from the same tree.

Great work!

Martina

vhere
03-05-2013, 04:58 AM
Teaching workshops around the world would be brilliant!

Quinacridone Gold
03-05-2013, 06:13 PM
Another plein air sketch from my pocket Moleskine. The sky was so deep - just lovely. (In the Greek Islands)

Quinacridone Gold
03-05-2013, 06:22 PM
These are from a travel journal - it's a gorgeous leather bound Italian book that I bought in Florence. The leather is soft and the paper is not very thick so I can only use one side, and write in pencil, but it can take a little watercolour. These are done during a bus trip in Western Australia. The book is 8 1/2" x 6 1/4" (or 22 x 16 in cm)

(I have cropped the writing off the sketches so the scale is a bit odd - some are actually very small.)

Quinacridone Gold
03-05-2013, 06:26 PM
I often do a map of a planned trip in my travel journal too. Australia is so huge that this is a pretty boring one!

Quinacridone Gold
03-05-2013, 06:36 PM
And one from my other travel journal, also an Italian leather bound book. Florence has to be one of my favourite cities!

JTMB
03-06-2013, 11:27 AM
Wonderful group of recent sketches! I love the inclusion of maps - unfortunately I doubt I'll ever visit the area you show here, though I would have loved it before developing ear issues that make flying difficult.

DrDebby
03-06-2013, 04:36 PM
Awesome sketches. Your description of the sketchbook sounds just lovely.

Riverfrog
03-06-2013, 05:24 PM
Up to your usual brilliant standard QG, they are really nice and I especially love the shells and the beach.

Rachel:clap:

poochemio
03-06-2013, 08:55 PM
Gotta love that Italian leather! Your Florence sketches are wonderful, one of my close friends is living there going to the Angel Academy, so nice to see some of her daily views.

mhimeswc
03-06-2013, 11:00 PM
Great sea shells and coral. I like the beach one too,

Dragoon
03-06-2013, 11:08 PM
Those are beautiful!

I had always wondered if the sky was really so BLUE in Grecian artworks...thanks for confirming!

Sorry to hear that the thin paper book held you back...though you did make the sketches look pretty good! Must have been an awesome vacation!

I love! the look of the finished/unfinished Florence sketch!
Cheers,
D.

Quinacridone Gold
03-07-2013, 01:40 AM
Awesome sketches. Your description of the sketchbook sounds just lovely.

They are just lovely. I'll attach a photo of them - the marbled one went to Europe with me a couple of years ago - took my daughter for a 7 week exploration (hence the Florence sketch) and is all but full. The black one went to Western Australia. I do love the wide landscape format. The Burnt Sienna one (that looks red in the photo) is unused...so far.

(I want to point out that the other pictures - the insides of buildings, dolphins etc are cut out of brochures and stuck in! Can't draw everything;) )

MartinaL
03-07-2013, 03:19 AM
it is a delight to see these beautiful sketches. I`m impressed! Wonderful sketchbooks!

Martina

DrDebby
03-07-2013, 02:05 PM
Thanks for showing the books themselves. Just gorgeous.

vhere
03-08-2013, 02:40 AM
What gorgeous books . Your journals look interesting. Lovely sketches.

Marmsk
03-08-2013, 03:43 AM
Lovely books and sketches. Great memories.

bookscorpion
03-08-2013, 04:10 AM
Do you happen to remember the name of the shop where you bought the book? It wasn't this one by any chance: http://www.giuliogiannini.com I bought a gorgeous leather-bound book there a couple of years ago that I've been meaning to sketch in.

Quinacridone Gold
03-08-2013, 05:47 AM
Do you happen to remember the name of the shop where you bought the book? It wasn't this one by any chance: http://www.giuliogiannini.com I bought a gorgeous leather-bound book there a couple of years ago that I've been meaning to sketch in.

I think it was called Il Papiro, right on the square by the Cathedral....there is also one in Melbourne, Australia! I think I went into every book shop I saw. I found another lovely bound book in Venice too - red! I have a lot of sketching to do....

As long as you use just one side of the paper it's very forgiving. I did a really wet experiment on one page of yet another Il Papiro leather bound book (which I use as a written journal) and it survived. I put layers and layers of colour and let it dry and it went back to almost flat, with little bleed though. Amazing really. I copied a quote about colours from a book I was reading at the time - 'People of the Book', in white pen.

Quinacridone Gold
03-08-2013, 05:52 AM
I think the thing is to use these gorgeous books, one way or another. :)

DrDebby
03-08-2013, 03:35 PM
Love seeing experiments in sketchbooks. I learn as much from other people's experiments as my own.

Meisie
03-09-2013, 07:35 PM
Loved looking through this thread with all the baeutiful studies! TFS!

Quinacridone Gold
03-10-2013, 04:53 PM
This is of a local creek, painted in the Italian travel journal. I love sitting in a quiet place trying to capture the mood.

DrDebby
03-10-2013, 10:08 PM
The little waterfall is darling. Wonderful sketch.

Joan T
03-12-2013, 05:37 PM
Your sketchbooks are great!!! I would love to get my hands on them and sit someplace quiet and go through them page by page!

Quinacridone Gold
03-13-2013, 05:37 PM
Your sketchbooks are great!!! I would love to get my hands on them and sit someplace quiet and go through them page by page!

Thanks Joan (and others)!

I love looking at artist's sketch books. I really think they show so much about the artist and how they see the world or think. You can see how much preliminary drawing was done (or not). 'Turner' is coming to Oz again this year - I love his landscape watercolours on tinted blue paper. Beautiful! And da Vinci of course. Wow.

I love the fact that when you look through your own, you are taken back to the time and place where they were done. I tell you what - you'd be busy for a few days with mine - I have sketch books with notes on every colour I have used, colour mixing (or colour play someone called it) books, as well as a number of visual diaries of various sorts where I keep a record of works in progress or ideas of paintings to come. Then there are the ones dedicated to calligraphy or specific materials. They take up a lot of space but I treasure them.

Fidgement
03-13-2013, 07:26 PM
Jane, your work is wonderful. You get a great range with your palette and your subject matter is nice to study. I look forward to seeing more of your work. Hopefully it will inspire me to get crackin. Thanks for sharing your journals.

Helen

Quinacridone Gold
04-17-2013, 06:27 AM
I went out painting today again at last. I have been busy doing paint tests and comparisons. Will add them to my website eventually...

This was in my small Moleskine - my favourite watercolour sketchbook, looking back at the sandstone rocks near Sydney harbour. A gorgeous Autumn day!

DrDebby
04-17-2013, 08:08 PM
Lovely landscape.

Dragoon
04-17-2013, 08:31 PM
Gorgeous!

Is that Goethite on the lowermost rocks? :)
It's already on my wishlist, but eager to see my new colour-to-be in action...

Your comment gave me pause, since its (finally!) Spring here!
Your sketch does look like a warm perfect day!
D.

jmb57
04-17-2013, 11:19 PM
love your sketchbook....once i started, i didnt stop until the last post today.
i always love seeing australian scenery, and getting your tips for colour mixes was such a bonus. the colours here are quite different to overseas, loved the leaves, though i wasnt able to copy it for some reason.
i will have to go through again and take some notes this time. thanks very much
janine

Quinacridone Gold
04-18-2013, 07:00 AM
Gorgeous!

Is that Goethite on the lowermost rocks? :)
It's already on my wishlist, but eager to see my new colour-to-be in action...

Your comment gave me pause, since its (finally!) Spring here!
Your sketch does look like a warm perfect day!
D.

Yes Dragoon - it is Goethite, with Buff titanium and Transparent Red Oxide. It's a fabulous yellow earth!

Quinacridone Gold
04-18-2013, 07:02 AM
love your sketchbook....once i started, i didnt stop until the last post today.
i always love seeing australian scenery, and getting your tips for colour mixes was such a bonus. the colours here are quite different to overseas, loved the leaves, though i wasnt able to copy it for some reason.
i will have to go through again and take some notes this time. thanks very much
janine

Thanks Janine. We certainly do have different colours here so different mixes are valuable.

You can do a screen shot to copy the leaves. Command + Shift + 4 on a Mac....

cheers
Jane

Marmsk
04-18-2013, 10:19 AM
:thumbsup: Your sketchbook is so interesting. Keep them coming.

Quinacridone Gold
07-01-2013, 02:44 AM
I joined a Sydney group of Urban Sketchers for an expedition to sketch at the university of Sydney. It's rather fun to have others around to talk with and share ideas.

I started with a view through a sandstone doorway into the Quad, then did a leaf that was floating around, then a grotesque.

Quinacridone Gold
07-01-2013, 02:47 AM
And on Saturday I joined the Sydney Sketchers group and draw in one of my favourite buildings in Sydney - the Strand Arcade. I din't tackle the whole architecture, just a couple of features - the wrought iron work and the balustrade detail.

Dragoon
07-01-2013, 11:41 AM
Those are all just scrumptious!!

But the doorway arch and the balustrade are amazing in their detail and life-resemblance! Those could be framed pieces, not just sketches! ;)

Interesting that you used a watersoluble pencil...I have some but avoid them for sketching with colours...but I see their graying effect can be put to good use!

Thanks!
D.

DrDebby
07-01-2013, 02:04 PM
Wonderful sketches. Love the architectural detail.

RainySea
07-01-2013, 07:47 PM
really beautiful detail

Quinacridone Gold
07-01-2013, 08:28 PM
Those are all just scrumptious!!

But the doorway arch and the balustrade are amazing in their detail and life-resemblance! Those could be framed pieces, not just sketches! ;)

Interesting that you used a watersoluble pencil...I have some but avoid them for sketching with colours...but I see their graying effect can be put to good use!

Thanks!
D.

Thank you D!
I really enjoy using water-soluble graphite. I usually do a quick sketch with a regular pencil to make sure of the layout since it erases easily, then work in water-soluble graphite if I am going to, then add paint carefully, starting in the lightest areas. Sometimes I work back in regular pencil again at the end. They are fantastic for stone and rock sketches!

I also have two dark grey watercolour pencils that are both a pretty good match for my 'Jane's Grey' ready mixed water-colour. They can be nice to use if I don't want the 'shine' of graphite. They are Derwent Inktense Neutral Gray and the gorgeous Faber Castel Albrecht Durer Payne's Grey. I have one of them in my handbag with my tiny travel kit and another in my larger plein air and teaching kit. I'll attach an image...

Quinacridone Gold
07-01-2013, 08:46 PM
I have updated my sketching kit since I last posted about it, and added some gorgeous supplies.

The first is the lovely tiny brass paint box that I asked John (www.littlebrassbox.com) to make for me. I wanted something really small - keyring sort of size - that was still functional, and it is. It is a joy to use and I find the 16 colours terrific. So my previous 12 colour cotman one has been retired after over 30 years!

I love the Sailor 1911 fountain pen, filled with nano waterproof black ink. The EF nib is the finest I have ever some across and it is working a treat for drawing and sketching in ink.

The brushes are a mixture - an Isabey squirrel mop is my favourite - such a beautiful point for painting and drawing on small paper. I also have a Rosemary & co squirrel mop and sable mop. Yum!

The other odd item you may have noticed is a porcupine quill, which I use to either scratch in super-fine details (pointy end) or 'dent' in less fine details - other end. I also use these for stirring up my custom mixes!

The other pen is a Lamy Joy with an extra fine nib and is also filled with Sailor Nano ink. Waterproof, bleed proof and dries super fast.

The watercolour sketch book is my favourite Moleskine, the orange protective case for my paintbox is also by Moleskine. The travel water-brush is Sakura.

I keep the orange and red cases with me all the time, along with a pocket Moleskine watercolour sketch book or an Alpha Stillman & Birn pocket size book (also very nice for writing and painting!)

Any other questions, ask away!

Dragoon
07-01-2013, 10:03 PM
Questions, you say? Well, since you don't mind...:angel:

But first, I gotta say your sketch kit looks awesome!
Thanks for sharing the photo, I'm sure I speak for many to say it is always fascinating to see whats in someone's sketch kit!

So what size exactly are those squirrel mops? They look pretty small...

Do you stand and hold all your stuff to sketch, or sit and lay it all out beside you? (I'm noticing the vitamin jar for water.)

I do like your naming of the bistre, "Jane's Gray". I bought some PBr7 from DS just so I could make some. I'll have to label the pan "Jane's Gray"!

Now we just need to find you one bag to hold all that stuff. ;)

Thanks so much for sharing!
D.

DrDebby
07-02-2013, 02:56 PM
That's a sweet sketch kit. Thanks for sharing.

Joan T
07-02-2013, 06:32 PM
The sketches from the Strand Arcade are wonderful...so nicely shaded. Sometimes less of the building creates more of an impact...and these do.

I love your additions to your sketch kit. Looks like you have a great setup.

Quinacridone Gold
07-02-2013, 07:21 PM
Questions, you say? Well, since you don't mind...:angel:

But first, I gotta say your sketch kit looks awesome!
Thanks for sharing the photo, I'm sure I speak for many to say it is always fascinating to see whats in someone's sketch kit!

So what size exactly are those squirrel mops? They look pretty small...

Do you stand and hold all your stuff to sketch, or sit and lay it all out beside you? (I'm noticing the vitamin jar for water.)

I do like your naming of the bistre, "Jane's Gray". I bought some PBr7 from DS just so I could make some. I'll have to label the pan "Jane's Gray"!

Now we just need to find you one bag to hold all that stuff. ;)

Thanks so much for sharing!
D.

:) Always enjoy your posts!

I generally sit - either I take a little fold up seat that packs away into an over the shoulder bag, or I sit on the floor/ground. The brass travel kit does sit in my hand perfectly but it's a pain to try to balance a sketch book and water container as well in one's hands. Possible, but a pain. All the same, I carry some blu tack with me just in case I need to attach my water to a rock or something and stand...that's the only disadvantage of such a small paint box - with a slightly bigger one you could attach the water to the palette.

The Isabey squirrel mop is small, but perfect for that size (A5-ish) sketch book - like a number 4 sable I suppose - 3/4 inch long and just under 3/16 inch wide. (19mm x 4mm) I do most of my work with this brush - the others don't necessarily get wet unless I want to wash in a sky or a larger area.

The Rosemary & co squirrel mop is bigger - just longer and just over 1/4 inch wide. (21mm x 7mm)

The Rosemary & co sable quill is 20mm x 5mm, so just between the two. She will send you a free catalogue, by the way, and all the pictures are actual size. Wonderful brushes and a HUGE range!!!

The water container is an empty Higgins eternal ink bottle. I figure that should be designed not to spill!

I carry it all in a nice leather back pack, with a water bottle, though I could just put it in my handbag - it's pretty compact.

Love it that you'll call your mix 'Jane's Grey'. That's what I call it with my students now. Gives us all a giggle.

Here is the tiny palette using the finger/thumb ring. You just don't realise how compact it is until you see it in the hand, but it works. Very happy;)

Quinacridone Gold
07-02-2013, 07:36 PM
Thank you Joan and Debbie.

I couldn't face doing the whole building. We were inside (it had been raining for over a week so outside wasn't an option!) So much intricate detail, so many repetitive patterns. I like to really focus on a small aspect of a large scene sometimes. A rock rather than a landscape....

Queenie83
07-03-2013, 11:43 AM
I like ur art and I LOVE your sketchin kit!!!!

Dragoon
07-03-2013, 05:51 PM
http://www.danielsmith.com/Item--i-001-900-852

Looks like DS is onto your Jane's Gray!:wave:

Now I need to find a transportable cushion...my butt gets sore.

Or I could learn to paint faster!
Thanks,
D.

Quinacridone Gold
07-03-2013, 06:03 PM
http://www.danielsmith.com/Item--i-001-900-852

Looks like DS is onto your Jane's Gray!:wave:

Now I need to find a transportable cushion...my butt gets sore.

Or I could learn to paint faster!
Thanks,
D.

:) Yes I order this pair a lot.

I have asked D.S. to make the grey as a tube colour, with almost exactly even amounts but just a touch of extra blue. They said they would look into it. Their new neutral tint works as they say to darken colours, but I don't want to add black to my paintings and I know a lot of other professional artists feel the same way. My grey works the same way without adding black, so they can have both!

In the meantime, I'll just keep on mixing my own.

I don't paint fast. The two images from the Strand were the result of 2 1/2 hours. The three from the University are also a 2 1/2 hour session. A folding chair does really help but you have to carry it. A blow-up cushion could work?

This Saturday we are going to a museum to paint - it is Winter here after all! I'll keep you posted!

Quinacridone Gold
07-03-2013, 06:08 PM
I like ur art and I LOVE your sketchin kit!!!!

Thank you!

It is important to get a kit sorted out that works perfectly for what you want to do, and then get out and do it of course! More soon...

Dragoon
07-03-2013, 09:12 PM
Thanks for including the brush sizes.

I have a travel Arches squirrel mop, it is a #3 and sorta large.
I have a regular Arches squirrel mop, it is a #2/0 and matches your smaller travel mop. I had not figured out a use for it yet, since most of my painting is done with an #8 round...but no way am I cutting down the handle to put it in a travel kit!
The reason the Arches mops are the only mops I own is partly because the handle is such a work of art, lol! Clear lacquered wood with silver printing. I love the look of wood!
Hmmm, thinking, thinking...

I think I'll get some more small ones, and keep them rubberbanded to a longer ruler in order to protect the tips. I have a travel case for brushes this can go in.

Thanks for posting how long you spent sketching! That certainly sounds reasonable considering the amount of detail you get into each sketch!

I get discouraged by watching vids of painters knock out nice little paintings with a few splashes of a brush. I saw Castagnet paint something in no time at all, and I was like, damn...
Cheers,
D.

Finvarra
07-04-2013, 04:32 AM
I love your leaf studies, they are very beautiful. Great sketching kit - Rosemary's brushes are brilliant, aren't they.

Cheers
Lesley

Quinacridone Gold
07-04-2013, 07:11 AM
Thanks for including the brush sizes.

I have a travel Arches squirrel mop, it is a #3 and sorta large.
I have a regular Arches squirrel mop, it is a #2/0 and matches your smaller travel mop. I had not figured out a use for it yet, since most of my painting is done with an #8 round...but no way am I cutting down the handle to put it in a travel kit!
The reason the Arches mops are the only mops I own is partly because the handle is such a work of art, lol! Clear lacquered wood with silver printing. I love the look of wood!
Hmmm, thinking, thinking...

I think I'll get some more small ones, and keep them rubberbanded to a longer ruler in order to protect the tips. I have a travel case for brushes this can go in.



I have the #3 Arches travel too - had it a long time and almost never used it. It is really large for a travel brush, which I thought might be a good thing but it turns out, not for me. It's stiff for a squirrel too. Disappointing.

Otherwise I have the Raphael mops 803 series. Gorgeous. Those and my Raphael sables do me very well at home. I agree though that I wouldn't want to cut them down. Your ruler protection idea is great - saves duplicating your brushes.

There are also various brush holders that do a pretty good job if you keep them up the right way. I like these ones http://www.dickblick.com/products/silver-brush-monaco-deluxe-artist-travel-case/ - and get them for my students all the time. I use one to take my regular brushes in to class when I am teaching. You can put your pencils and other bits in the zippered section. There is always a solution isn't there!



happy painting.

Quinacridone Gold
07-04-2013, 07:13 AM
I love your leaf studies, they are very beautiful. Great sketching kit - Rosemary's brushes are brilliant, aren't they.

Cheers
Lesley

Thanks Lesley.

Yes they are great brushes, and such a massive range. I have asked her to make a travel/pocket triangular brush (or dagger brush) for plein air - looking forward to seeing how that will turn out...

Dragoon
07-04-2013, 03:49 PM
Gosh, that case is perfect! Thank you!

I have something similar, but it is mesh on the pocketed side. That would catch brush hairs, not good. The case you linked has a smooth plastic pocket.
AND comes in something other than black *whew!
I'm pretty tired of dim black interiors on bags and cases. :rolleyes:

Happy sketching!
D.

vhere
07-04-2013, 06:12 PM
Nice sketches and I agree , Rosemary's brushes are fantastic.

Quinacridone Gold
07-06-2013, 05:08 AM
Went to the museum at Sydney University today. We were asked to use dry media, so I carefully added a bit of watercolour with my water brush. I prefer normal brushes but it did work very well.

I used my lovely Sailor fountain pen - so nice to sketch with.

DrDebby
07-06-2013, 03:06 PM
Fabulous bugs.

robertsloan2
07-06-2013, 07:05 PM
Just found your thread and lazily read backwards looking at all your beautiful watercolor sketches. I'm awed. I love the detail, the accuracy, the rich colors and fascinating information.

I didn't know about vegetable oil being able to clean off pthalo stains on a palette! That's been driving me nuts for years. I love the DS paints too but my palette rotates when I'm at home. When I'm out I have a Winsor & Newton Artists' paintbox, similar to the Cotman one that has the little water bottle and tiny brush in it (probably the one you had as a teenager with so much skill!) You really were a natural right from the beginning. That bird was so striking.

Thank you for sharing everything! I'm going to keep watching now, your stuff is awesome. As for the little brass box man, he'll have to wait till I'm 62 and have more income to order things. I'll qualify for subsidized housing then and wind up with quite a lot more left over after essentials. Fortunately I bought so many supplies while I was living in Arkansas and Kansas with my daughter that I'm stocked up for ages, don't need to get new stuff for a long time.

Meisie
07-06-2013, 07:19 PM
Oh very nice indeed. I like the light washes. And just enough shadows to make them pop!

Finvarra
07-08-2013, 04:29 AM
Beautiful little drawings.

Cheers
Lesley

pezk
07-08-2013, 02:32 PM
You are an inspiration. I love looking at your sketches. I've been putting together a small watercolor sketch kit for use in the car or on foot. Any suggestions for a beginner to this type of sketching?

Quinacridone Gold
07-13-2013, 09:13 PM
You are an inspiration. I love looking at your sketches. I've been putting together a small watercolor sketch kit for use in the car or on foot. Any suggestions for a beginner to this type of sketching?

Thank you! I love what I do and get to do what I love. What more could a person want?

What I'd suggest you start doing is drawing a lot. It doesn't matter what you draw, it's a case of getting in practice at drawing what you see. If you are familiar with the idea of using your pencil to 'scale' your drawing, that's also very helpful. If not, I'll try to explain what I mean...let me know.

I generally start with a very light pencil sketch to get the layout. I use a B or a 2B so they don't dig into the page but can still be erased. Once I have the layout I go a little darker with the pencil, or switch to a water-soluable graphite pencil if I want a lot of graphite shading - good for rocks and darker foliage. Then I start adding come colour. Lightest first, or background first, or most important first - I don't follow any real rules on that.

If the work is very finely detailed I use a fine pointed brush and lightly outline the shapes in colour then erase the pencil altogether with a kneadable eraser. Then use colour in the washes. That's how I do roses and leaves in particular.

But I work small for all of these sketches - A5 landscape is my favourite- on nice paper, and I keep going until it is 'finished' as a sketch. Working in a book is good - you can look back on them and remember where you were when you were doing each one - the weather, what else was going on etc.

Good luck with it.

Quinacridone Gold
07-13-2013, 09:26 PM
Just found your thread and lazily read backwards looking at all your beautiful watercolor sketches. I'm awed. I love the detail, the accuracy, the rich colors and fascinating information.

I didn't know about vegetable oil being able to clean off pthalo stains on a palette! That's been driving me nuts for years. I love the DS paints too but my palette rotates when I'm at home. When I'm out I have a Winsor & Newton Artists' paintbox, similar to the Cotman one that has the little water bottle and tiny brush in it (probably the one you had as a teenager with so much skill!) You really were a natural right from the beginning. That bird was so striking.

Thank you for sharing everything! I'm going to keep watching now, your stuff is awesome. As for the little brass box man, he'll have to wait till I'm 62 and have more income to order things. I'll qualify for subsidized housing then and wind up with quite a lot more left over after essentials. Fortunately I bought so many supplies while I was living in Arkansas and Kansas with my daughter that I'm stocked up for ages, don't need to get new stuff for a long time.

Thank you Rob!

My tiny Little Brass Box was a present to myself when I sold a large painting this year. I bought the larger one when I sold another large painting earlier this year. I bought the great fine Sailor's pen when I sold a large print. I kinda like to reinvest a bit of the money! But as I've said, my Cotman one lasted 30 years and did very well. I just wanted a few extra colours with me while still keeping it small. My 16 colours are terrific. I also have a super tiny palette of 7 that I made - the size of a large coin. I don't know if I posted that? Anyway, the important thing is to be out using whatever palette you have and I love that W&N one too. So many great designs it's no surprise some of us have a large collection!

Happy painting!

Quinacridone Gold
07-13-2013, 11:08 PM
I went to the Snowy Mountains for a few days and opted to only ski some of them. The rest of the time I read and sketched. These ones were done in a Stillman & Birn pocket sized Alpha hardbound book - one I am trying out as an all-purpose sketch/note and colourplat book to keep with me. So far so good - takes colours well, takes pencil and pen well and you can actually paint on both sides of the paper! They are pretty small - the image on the computer will be larger than the actual sketch.

Quinacridone Gold
07-13-2013, 11:14 PM
This tree was painted in another book again - I bought it in 2007 in New York. It's my sketchbook #14 but I've hardly used it. It's the lovely A5 landscape format that I love but the paper is a bit cream. Same paper as the beetles earlier.

The snow gum trees can have a lot of colour and personality. This one is in the Thredbo Village.

Quinacridone Gold
07-13-2013, 11:18 PM
This one is in my favourite Moleskine watercolour sketchbook - #15 that I started in 2009 and am now using the back of pages. Time for a new one! It's another snow gum - a huge one on the property where I was staying at the altitude of 1260.

robertsloan2
07-14-2013, 05:17 AM
Oh wow! I love these last three. I didn't know Stillman & Birn had a pocket size now! I love my S&B journals, going to have to look into getting a pocket size one to carry around. I should finish my little Moleskine first but I can definitely look forward to that. They're so sturdy and well bound and their paper does take painting on both sides easily.

Love the Snowy Mountains scenes, the panorama and that lacy little tree from the cafe window are gorgeous. The snow gums are wonderful. The variety of shapes and bends in the branches, that interesting trunk texture are so beautiful. I can see why you spent more time painting than skiing!

I used to ski but I don't function as well in cold weather as I used to. You've given me a good idea for something to do if someone ever invites me up to Lake Tahoe in the winter or any nearby mountain area. But then my friends all know I'm in a power chair anyway and would be content to sit at the picture windows painting scenery from inside in the warm. It's still plein air if you're indoors at a window or inside a car when you paint it!

I loved my old Cotman Field Box and it was a bit frivolous to replace it entirely instead of just buying 14 half pans to turn it into an Artist Field Box, but I liked the darker box. Gave the old one to a friend to turn her on to field painting, hope she likes it and uses it. I think I refilled it so many times I couldn't count it.

I know what you mean about collecting different pocket sets. I found some tiny Richeson kid tins with eight tiny color pans and bought two of them for my grandkids as stocking stuffers - and an extra one for me, I popped out the children's paints and put dots of Daniel Smith watercolors in their place. That one is now in my vest pocket with a waterbrush, handy whenever I go anywhere.

poochemio
07-14-2013, 10:50 AM
love the textures in your gum trees.

Finvarra
07-14-2013, 01:02 PM
Love the delicate colours and the light on the trees. Gorgeous!

Cheers
Lesley

DrDebby
07-14-2013, 03:08 PM
Amazing and wonderful sketches.

Quinacridone Gold
07-17-2013, 06:53 PM
Thank you Margo, Lesley, Debbie and Rob.

And Rob - I agree it doesn't matter whether you are inside or out, you can still be painting. Looking out at the snow from a cafe is just lovely. Being in the mountains in Winter is just lovely. I am sorry to hear you are less mobile than you were but once you are seated comfortably it's all good eh!

I get very cold out in the snow, though I did set myself up literally standing in the snow for another picture. I had to leave to watch my son ski racing so may have to finish that from a photo. Cheating, but hey - my sketches are largely for me really anyway! I think that's one of the things I like about working in a sketch book. Usually I don't remove any pages (unless my son's friends draw less than charming pictures in them that I don't want to look at, as happened recently!) and so I never frame them or put them up for sale. I do sometimes do a larger picture from them though, but they are still largely private. I love the way the memories flood back as you look through a sketchbook.

I recently 'catalogued' them by the date I started them (going back to 1984 when I bought my first 'bound' book for my etching proofs) and am up to number 26 in many different shapes and sizes from a large bound book to a small pocket Moleskine, some spiral, some bound, all black covers. Then there are the travel ones that I have posted about - another set.

Not that they are all full - some I just don't like using as much as others. I think the Stillman and Birn Alpha pocket will be a permanent addition to my handbag kit though. Great all-round sketch and note book. It doesn't have an elastic to keep it closed so I just use a hair tie!

A Beta landscape A5 could knock my watercolour Moleskine off it's perch as my favourite watercolour book, but they don't make that yet....I do have an Alpha in that format which is unused. I need to decide whether to use that next or another Moleskine watercolour for my plein air...decisions decisions.

Joan T
07-19-2013, 07:55 AM
Oh, those trees are gorgeous! I think we all have a collection of assorted journals we are working in. Some are better for one kind of sketching than another.

I also find that with the sketches you can go back and remember almost everything about where the sketch was done...sights, sounds, etc. Looking at the sketch triggers all the sensations.

vhere
07-19-2013, 12:16 PM
I also find that with the sketches you can go back and remember almost everything about where the sketch was done...sights, sounds, etc. Looking at the sketch triggers all the sensations.

Very true, far more than photos

Quinacridone Gold
07-20-2013, 09:03 AM
You are an inspiration. I love looking at your sketches. I've been putting together a small watercolor sketch kit for use in the car or on foot. Any suggestions for a beginner to this type of sketching?

I recently posted a work in progress on my blog http://janeblundellart.blogspot.com.au/2013/07/watercolour-work-in-progress-jacaranda.html

The finished (apart from the shadow) work is this study of two Jacaranda seed pods.

DrDebby
07-20-2013, 02:41 PM
Lovely seed pods.

Fidgement
07-24-2013, 04:25 PM
Jane, I've been away from WC for a bit and its such a treat to read through your thread and look at all the great eye candy from your paintings. Thanks for sharing these and all your tips. I'm looking forward to seeing a lot more.

Cheers, Helen

vhere
07-26-2013, 12:13 PM
Lovely!

Quinacridone Gold
07-28-2013, 01:07 AM
It's National Tree Day today so the Sydney Sketch Group met up in a park. I painted an angophora and a bit of leaf litter.

Quinacridone Gold
07-28-2013, 01:08 AM
...and added some shadow to the seed pods...

vhere
07-28-2013, 04:43 AM
leven better with the shadows, lovely studies

Finvarra
07-28-2013, 06:01 AM
I do love the tree bark you have in your country, beautiful. Our local arboretum has a section with Australian trees, it's a delight to the eyes.

Cheers
Finvarra

DrDebby
07-28-2013, 02:07 PM
Delightful trees and seeds.

vhere
07-29-2013, 03:53 AM
And I forgot to comment on the lovely variety of warm and cool browns

Queenie83
07-30-2013, 12:14 PM
wow!! you are so good!!! trees are perfect!

Quinacridone Gold
07-30-2013, 08:28 PM
Thank you all again.
I rather like painting these dead looking things. Burnt Umber, Raw Umber, Burnt Sienna and my Jane's Grey pretty much cover it. Raw Umber can be mixed of course but I find it such a convenient colour to have, provided it is a PBr7 - nice a deep cool brown.

The angophora obviously had some other colours too - Indian Red is perfect for the slight earthy pink, Transparent Red Oxide for the slash of granulating burnt orange, and then the greens for the background. Love those Daniel Smith colours!

Joan T
08-01-2013, 04:12 PM
Your trees are wonderful!!! You are good at keeping the light areas of the trees light. Nice!!

Quinacridone Gold
08-04-2013, 07:16 AM
Today's sketch group was at the Old Coal Loader, Balls Head Bay. Won't mean much to many - I'd never been there or even knew about it. Lots of wonderful tunnels and an old jetty. you could spend a lot of time there.
This is my study of on of the sandstone tunnels.
Watercolour in a Moleskine watercolour sketchbook.

poochemio
08-04-2013, 09:21 AM
awesome

Dragoon
08-04-2013, 02:05 PM
That is awesome!
I like how you've faded it to darkness while still keeping some details of what's inside. I've always found that difficult to do! You have a very delicate touch with balancing all the values and colours. :clap:

How interesting it is to see how much work went into making that tunnel, that now is abandoned...

Your trees are amazing, too!
Thanks!
D.

DrDebby
08-04-2013, 05:17 PM
Stunning sketch of the tunnel.

Quinacridone Gold
08-05-2013, 04:22 AM
That is awesome!
I like how you've faded it to darkness while still keeping some details of what's inside. I've always found that difficult to do! You have a very delicate touch with balancing all the values and colours. :clap:

How interesting it is to see how much work went into making that tunnel, that now is abandoned...

Your trees are amazing, too!
Thanks!
D.

Thank you!

I think I've mentioned my 'Jane's grey' mixture a number of times, but it's in this sort of massage that it comes into its own. I warm it up with a touch of burnt sienna or cool it down with a touch of Ultramarine or add a bit of raw umber for more deep punch. Works so well in dark passages that still have something going on.

vhere
08-05-2013, 12:48 PM
Beautifully done with lovely subtle colours :)

cat1lady
08-07-2013, 09:47 PM
Very nice trees.

Joan T
08-07-2013, 09:49 PM
Wonderful job on the tunnel!!! Your sketches are great to see.

Quinacridone Gold
09-08-2013, 08:32 AM
I went away for a wonderful art weekend with 5 friends and we tackled the challenging cliffs in the Blue Mountains West of Sydney. We went to three different lookouts and here are the sketches from two of them.

Quinacridone Gold
09-08-2013, 08:36 AM
In the evenings, I painted flowers from the garden and a selection of leaves. Did I mention that I love painting leaves??? I also painted some pebbles at the top of one of the lookouts.

Quinacridone Gold
09-08-2013, 08:39 AM
Today I went out with the Sydney Sketch Group to Georges Heights Artist precinct and attempted the view over the ocean to North Head. It started to rain so we went under cover and I switched to leaves and coffee cups!

DrDebby
09-08-2013, 03:36 PM
Your sketches are gorgeous.

Quinacridone Gold
09-09-2013, 05:41 AM
Thank you Debbie. Such a satisfying way to spend some time!

vhere
09-09-2013, 09:30 AM
Lovely, especially the leaves and rocks :)

jmb57
09-09-2013, 10:13 AM
love your work, i live in brisbane, so it is good to see local area!!
thanks so much, you really are inspiring.

Joan T
09-10-2013, 06:24 PM
Beautiful sketches of the cliffs. They remind me of our Grand Canyon. Your leaves are wonderful!!!

JennyMK
11-01-2013, 06:18 AM
I've missed a lot of great pages, your watercolors are truly stunning to look at!

mhimeswc
11-02-2013, 09:00 AM
I love your flowers and leaves.

Quinacridone Gold
11-04-2013, 11:08 PM
Thank you for all the lovely comments. I have been busy lately getting some work done for exhibitions so haven't added any sketches for a while, but I will soon. just loving getting out and about with a sketchbook and watercolours.

Quinacridone Gold
11-23-2013, 01:21 AM
A bit more detail...

I have been working in a lovely wide format smooth sketch book on some more detailed studies - more serious paintings I suppose rather than sketches - but am quite enjoying the format. Here are three of them. The pods have popped up before as I have done them a couple of times. I did enjoy doing the shells. They have been hanging around since I collected them a long time ago and I have so many that could be painted...

Fidgement
11-23-2013, 01:07 PM
Jane, all of your work is lovely. The Hibiscus flowers are so true to the real thing. We grow those here where I live in the States. Very well done and thanks for sharing.
Helen

DrDebby
11-23-2013, 02:00 PM
Gorgeous sketches.

rasaluk
11-24-2013, 09:41 PM
Lovely work!

Joan T
11-26-2013, 04:41 PM
Gorgeous shells, leaves, and veggies!

Munin Raven
11-30-2013, 10:14 AM
Superb WC sketches. Your use of colour is lovely to see.

JennyMK
12-29-2013, 08:32 PM
I especially like those shells, they are so delicately painted!

vhere
12-30-2013, 03:34 AM
Beautifully observed

jacquip
12-30-2013, 04:52 PM
Jane love all of your sketches. Some great work. I love painting leaves too. you have really captured the colours and atmosphere of Aus. It is great to see some more local sights.

Scattykat
12-31-2013, 03:28 PM
so many beautiful sketches, cannot pick a fave, all brill :thumbsup:

Christie
04-02-2014, 09:45 PM
I have spent a very enjoyable half hour going through this thread. Beautiful paintings and such a variety of subject matter!

Quinacridone Gold
04-29-2014, 09:41 PM
I have been a bit quiet here for a while. It takes so long to resize the images and post them! Anyway, I had a holiday from teaching over Easter and chose to sketch...my sketching tools. I did my tiny travel set first, then tackled my fill plein air set.

Quinacridone Gold
04-29-2014, 09:43 PM
Then I decided to do a painting of each item in my full plein air and teaching kit. A lovely challenge in painting different textures and materials
...and here is the finished study.
The WIP is on my blog. http://www.janeblundellart.blogspot.com.au/2014/04/plein-air-painting-materials-work-in.html

Wagtail
04-30-2014, 03:19 PM
That is excellent! Love it.

DrDebby
04-30-2014, 03:53 PM
Wonderful seeing your kits drawn out.

vhere
05-01-2014, 03:43 AM
Beautifully done

tamiea
05-01-2014, 07:35 AM
lovely sketches :) thats a lot of tools. But white pen that is good idea I should probably include one in my kit too.

Joan T
05-01-2014, 05:01 PM
Love the sketching supplies painting across the two pages of your sketchbook. I keep a white pen too. They come in really handy!

zoodlemaker
09-09-2014, 06:03 PM
Really enjoying this thread! I just noticed it today.

robertsloan2
09-19-2014, 02:09 PM
I love seeing all of these, you've done so much since I last looked at this thread. The azaleas were glorious, looked more like azaleas than hibiscus, wonderful flowers. Great landscapes and rocky headlands by the sea. Gorgeous leaves, I love the way you capture such fine detail and strong color in them. Cool shells and everything but I really loved the last two, painting your supplies! They're wonderful. I'm glad you're doing the larger kit as a prints edition, that's just inspirational.

Love those little brass palette boxes, so compact and handy.

Quinacridone Gold
09-20-2014, 05:12 AM
Thanks for stopping by :-) More to add Robert. I keep my website more updated as it's so much easier to load images. Have a look here if you wish.
http://www.janeblundellart.com/plein-air-sketches.html

robertsloan2
09-21-2014, 09:39 AM
Ooh beautiful! I love the Little Brass Box fellow's work. Glad he's got the Travel Palettes now. Could see 32 half pans in one. It's amazing he gets 16 full pans into one, gorgeous. Someday... maybe after I sell art again. I like how he does the water cup for the tiny one too.

Thanks for the link to your blog! I love the zoo sketches and the quick ones of musicians too. Everything in it's gorgeous. Cool to do a gallery of all 2014 paintings!

vhere
09-21-2014, 10:33 AM
Some really nice work there:)

Quinacridone Gold
10-28-2014, 06:51 PM
I have been doing lots of sketching at a lovely island in Sydney Harbour - Cockatoo Island. It has a rather bleak history as a convict prison, ship building facility, corrective school for boys and for girls at various times - but it is now open to the public and I go there to draw the now defunct machines that lie around in the sunshine. This is some sort of metal milling machine.
I have found, at last, some lovely waterproof brown ink for my fountain pens - I highly recommend it. Made by the German Company De Atramentis, who also make a wonderful waterproof black ink. Check out their Document Range.

Quinacridone Gold
10-28-2014, 06:52 PM
I have no idea what this machine did. It is huge.

Quinacridone Gold
10-28-2014, 06:55 PM
And here are some 'guardians' that look over the island. They were once beam bending machines.

Quinacridone Gold
10-28-2014, 06:58 PM
Here is another rusty old crane.
These are all painted in an A5 Moleskine watercolour sketchbook. I have plenty of the old stock as I am not sure I will like the new paper :-(

Quinacridone Gold
10-28-2014, 07:01 PM
...and another sort of machine - my son's saxophone! Exploring a limited palette with these studies.

pezk
10-29-2014, 08:00 AM
Jane, these drawings are very good. I love the shadow colors esp. How many colors do you think is the optimal number for plein air watercolor sketching?

vhere
10-29-2014, 01:45 PM
Great!

DrDebby
10-29-2014, 02:37 PM
Awesome. All the old machinery is very interesting.

Quinacridone Gold
10-29-2014, 03:09 PM
Jane, these drawings are very good. I love the shadow colors esp. How many colors do you think is the optimal number for plein air watercolor sketching?


It's a good question but one with many answers.

My approach is to be able to mix whatever colour I want by mixing preferably only two colours. Also, I am a realist to I want to be able to mix the right colour, so I tend to have a good range of yellows, reds and blues, plenty of earth colours and some convenience greens.

If you are not a realist and are happy to be 'near enough' and are good at colour mixing the minimal practical palette is 4 I think - mid yellow, a primary red or magenta (ie one that makes oranges AND purples) and a versatile blue like Ultramarine or perhaps phthalo blue Red Shade. Add to that some sort of orange to neutralise the blue to create browns, greys and deep blues - could be a bright orange to increase the bright red options or a burnt orange or a burnt sienna. But with 4 colours you have to have plenty of mixing space.

The smallest palette I'd want to work with for plein air has 15 colours, one of which is my premixed 'Jane's Grey', and is shown on my website as my 'ultimate mixing set' (I'll add a photo here too) from which you can make a huge range of great colours. I have actually just completed all the charts for a book I am making showing all the possible mixes with this palette. It will be a 60 page book! This set has a premixed grey, but no premixed greens as I never use phthalo green alone, but you can create a huge range of green and earth colours with it. It also has some lovely limited triad options. (Note the warm red is Pyrrol Scarlet - not fully labelled on the photo. All DS colours though they don't all have to be ;) )

However the palette I choose to use has 24, many of which are convenient earth colours and 5 of which are greens! Some great pre-mixed greens and greys really speed up the process when painting en plein air.

pezk
10-29-2014, 07:25 PM
Thx Jane for the info. Great that you are writing a book. It will be very helpful, I'm sure.
I keep trying to settle on just 12. I think I have it, then I decide it's not the right 12 afterall. Or maybe I need 2 more, or than maybe not.

Quinacridone Gold
10-30-2014, 01:53 AM
Thx Jane for the info. Great that you are writing a book. It will be very helpful, I'm sure.
I keep trying to settle on just 12. I think I have it, then I decide it's not the right 12 afterall. Or maybe I need 2 more, or than maybe not.

If I were to choose just 12 - which fit nicely into many palettes - I would have Buff titanium; a warm and a mid or cool yellow, probably Hansa yellow medium + Quinacridone Gold; a warm and a cool red - probably Pyrrol Scarlet + Carmine; a warm and a cool blue - Ultramarine + Cerulean Chromium; Phthalo Green; Goethite or raw sienna, Burnt Sienna, and Jane's Grey. For the last colour I'd be tossing up between Phthalo Blue and Indian red and would go with Phthalo blue since it will mix with the scarlet to make an Indian Red hue. (Note all Daniel Smith, though there are other options)

There is no right palette, but there is one that will allow you to do what you want within whatever limits you decide to place on yourself. If your limit is 12, you just need to find the palette you like with enough mixing space and enough basic colours to be able to make the other colours you'll need while painting. The 12 above would be the best 12 for me. They work well for my students as I teach them how to mix with them. I can't say whether they'd work for you :-)

I actually have another fun palette with a yellow, orange, crimson, Purple, Ultramarine, Phthalo green and grey that is wonderful to use, though you have to mix all the earth colours. Just 7, but very interesting. I don't choose to use it for plein air as the earth colours are so useful out in the landscape!

Quinacridone Gold
10-30-2014, 01:56 AM
Here are a couple of limited palette studies. Mushrooms and a teapot using earths and Jane's grey.

DrDebby
10-30-2014, 03:49 PM
The mushroom is outstanding. Lovely teapot.

robertsloan2
10-30-2014, 08:21 PM
Gorgeous machines and beautiful mushrooms and teapot. Enjoyed the palette discussion.

Absolute minimum to me is 3 - suggested by Winsor & Newton on their website. Lemon Yellow, Permanent Rose, Ultramarine (or French Ultramarine usually). I can do browns with that triad. Daniel Smith's Primary Triad is about that usable too even if it's a more mid-red. I got into triad palettes on account of loving Daniel Smith and sometimes like to use just a triad to paint. They put together such interesting and sometimes weird combinations in them and there's always at least one subject it suits.

Your palettes are cool though. I like having Payne's Grey for dark as a convenience color and love Quinacridone Gold. I like changing up my palette though, again, a side effect of too many DS triads and different pocket sets.

Joan T
11-01-2014, 08:49 AM
Super job on these! I love the one of the mushrooms especially!

Nick7
11-01-2014, 09:09 AM
Jane, it's incredible. I would have never thought that I would put mushrooms on my wall, but I would! :D

Quinacridone Gold
11-11-2014, 02:37 AM
Thank you. I so enjoy painting mushrooms. There are some subjects you just go back to over and over again.

Here are a couple of sketches done in Bourke Street, Surry Hills (Sydney) a couple of weekends ago. One of a house on the corner, the other of the Bourke Street Bakery that had a queue the whole time we were sketching.

I am really enjoying the brown ink - softer than black. It's De Atramentis Document ink. They are putting out a range of mixable inks in CYMK colours so you can make your own waterproof fountain pen colours. Fantastic!

Nick7
11-11-2014, 02:43 AM
Jane, the color harmony is fantastic. Thank you for sharing.
I would happily have the latter one on the wall in my room. It's so lovely and has a great atmosphere. It reminds me of the colonial houses in Singapore.

Nick7
11-11-2014, 02:47 AM
lol, I have just noticed my previous comment. OK, so that makes two paintings of yours on my wall :D

vhere
11-11-2014, 03:39 AM
Lovely sketches. I like a range of colours but dot use too may within one painting. I wouldn't like to be without pthalos, magenta and viridian because of the gorgeous mixes they make.

The ink sounds wonderful. I need to see if you can get it here.

Quinacridone Gold
11-11-2014, 06:27 AM
lol, I have just noticed my previous comment. OK, so that makes two paintings of yours on my wall :D
LOL
If every you seriously want them, I can have lovely giclee prints of any of them ;-)

Thanks!

Nick7
11-11-2014, 08:01 AM
LOL
If every you seriously want them, I can have lovely giclee prints of any of them ;-)

Thanks!
I will PM you when I get home :)

DrDebby
11-11-2014, 02:56 PM
Great sketches. I'll have to check out the fountain pen inks.

Quinacridone Gold
11-11-2014, 04:08 PM
Great sketches. I'll have to check out the fountain pen inks.

Here is the website http://www.de-atramentis.com/document-ink-/?document-ink-=&cat=c54&cPath=54&page=1

Notice though that the yellow is not yet shown. They will make a set of CYMK available with the thinner at some stage. Goulet pens stock some of the colours and are probably the fastest to act on getting them in. As they are hand-made stocking takes a while.

Anyway, the ones I have tried - Document Black, Document Brown, Document Blue, Document Dark Blue and Document Magneta - are wonderful. You can see them, and others, on my blog post here http://janeblundellart.blogspot.com.au/2014/11/coloured-drawing-inks.html

Prior to these the best mixing inks I have used are actually Australian - Art Spectrum - they are pigmented, lightfast and waterproof, and come in a rainbow of colours including CYMK colours, but i don't use them in fountain pens. Perhaps you could? Here's their website
http://www.artspectrum.com.au/old/inks.html

eyepaint
11-11-2014, 10:14 PM
Wonderful work! :-)

DrDebby
11-12-2014, 02:29 PM
Thank you for the links. :)

Quinacridone Gold
11-12-2014, 02:55 PM
This was a couple of weekends ago. It was a glorious spring day and I spent a Saturday morning at a local sandstone church. I really enjoyed drawing in the brown ink again, then adding watercolour.

Joan T
11-12-2014, 09:31 PM
This one of the church is so soft and filled with light.

vhere
11-13-2014, 04:07 AM
Lovely

DrDebby
11-13-2014, 01:24 PM
Marvelous church sketch. You are right, the brown ink is great. Black ink would have ruined the softness of the sketch.

Quinacridone Gold
11-19-2014, 04:05 PM
Thank you :-)
I have been mixing all sorts of different coloured inks with the De Atramentis ones. Really fun. Now to do my own light-fast tests. They are rated 8 on the Blue Wool scale but I like to test my self before doing work for sale.

Here are some more done at Cockatoo Island a little while ago. I just keep going back there - so many interesting things to draw and paint.

With these I was exploring drawing with pen first, then watercolour. I find it fascinating how it changes they approach. If it is a pencil drawing I keep it realistic but with a pen drawing it is already 'abstracted' or stylised by the pen, so it is so much more a 'sketch' rather than a 'painting'.

eyepaint
11-19-2014, 04:15 PM
This is some sort of metal milling machine.
Wonderful!!! All!

DrDebby
11-20-2014, 02:27 PM
Wonderful sketches. Even tho' more "abstract", you can identify what the subject is.

Joan T
11-20-2014, 05:43 PM
Beautiful job on the pipes!!! That's my favorite of the two great sketches.

Nick7
02-01-2015, 08:13 AM
A bit more detail...

I have been working in a lovely wide format smooth sketch book on some more detailed studies - more serious paintings I suppose rather than sketches - but am quite enjoying the format. Here are three of them. The pods have popped up before as I have done them a couple of times. I did enjoy doing the shells. They have been hanging around since I collected them a long time ago and I have so many that could be painted...

Only after I started to flirt with watercolors, I can REALLY appreciate the beauty and your skills :)

PaintDoodles
02-04-2015, 11:10 PM
Thank you. I so enjoy painting mushrooms. There are some subjects you just go back to over and over again.

Here are a couple of sketches done in Bourke Street, Surry Hills (Sydney) a couple of weekends ago. One of a house on the corner, the other of the Bourke Street Bakery that had a queue the whole time we were sketching.

I am really enjoying the brown ink - softer than black. It's De Atramentis Document ink. They are putting out a range of mixable inks in CYMK colours so you can make your own waterproof fountain pen colours. Fantastic!

Fabulous, Jane. I love everything you do. I am a beginner sketchers/watercolor painter and just love your style. How big is the sketch and what brush size did you use for the fence?

I found my 14-color palette from your web site. They seem to make all the colors I love so I chose your recommended 14 colors.

PaintDoodles
02-05-2015, 09:19 AM
I joined a Sydney group of Urban Sketchers for an expedition to sketch at the university of Sydney. It's rather fun to have others around to talk with and share ideas.

I started with a view through a sandstone doorway into the Quad, then did a leaf that was floating around, then a grotesque.

Jane, what colors did you use on the brick? I want to learn to sketch Mediterranean buildings and I think the colors might be similar.

vhere
02-05-2015, 03:42 PM
Lovely :)

robertsloan2
02-08-2015, 02:52 PM
Wow, Jane! Love the boiler stuff, very cool and atmospheric. Gorgeous architectural with the church, love the light in it and agree the brown ink adds to the loveliness.

I like doing this sort of thing with Pigma Microns, used to have a sepia set for doing brown sketching as well as using black.

SAS Designs
02-19-2015, 12:12 PM
Jane,
I love your website, and didn't realize you were on WC. Thank you for this fabulous thread.
When can we BUY your book????
Suzy

Quinacridone Gold
03-09-2015, 04:12 PM
Jane, what colors did you use on the brick? I want to learn to sketch Mediterranean buildings and I think the colors might be similar.

I use a mixture of Goethite and Buff Titanium for the brick work - both Daniel Smith - both granulating. I add a little burnt sienna or Jane's Grey for the extra warmth or shadows. Best on damp paper.

Quinacridone Gold
03-09-2015, 04:14 PM
Jane,
I love your website, and didn't realize you were on WC. Thank you for this fabulous thread.
When can we BUY your book????
Suzy

Suzy I am working on a book on sketching. It's a while off but it's in the pipeline. My first colour mixing book is on Blurb.com (Watercolour Mixing Charts) and the second is about to be added - hopefully in March 2015. Called The Ultimate Mixing Palette: a World of Colours.
After that I'll be self-publishing a book on my paintings - 35 years worth - then a book about sketching.
Details are on my blog and website :-)

Nick7
03-09-2015, 04:22 PM
Hi Jane, nice to see you online again. I hope you have time for painting as well! :)

Quinacridone Gold
03-09-2015, 06:16 PM
Hi Jane, nice to see you online again. I hope you have time for painting as well! :)

:-) Thanks Nick. Some sketching, but no serious paintings for a while. I'll update this site again when my book is published, but in the meantime you can see what I have been sketching recently here. (http://www.janeblundellart.com/plein-air-sketches.html)

Heading off to the UK soon via Hong Kong and Paris so I should be able to add some more international flavour.

KreativeK
03-18-2015, 04:20 PM
Jane, your work is simply gorgeous!

Quinacridone Gold
03-18-2015, 04:24 PM
Jane, your work is simply gorgeous!
Thank you!
That's a lovely message to wake up to :-)

Quinacridone Gold
03-18-2015, 04:39 PM
I haven't been adding many sketches lately though I have been doing some most weekends. Mostly I have been working on a book, mentioned above - 'The Ultimate Mixing Palette: a World of Colours'. I painted all the mixing charts in 2 A5 Moleskine watercolour sketchbooks. I had them professionally photographed and colour-matched, and the difference from my home scans is quite amazing. You can see the difference in this Blog post here (http://janeblundellart.blogspot.com.au/2015/01/the-professional-touch.html)

I added the labels to the charts and then added a whole lot of notes on colour mixes along with tips and suggestions for each chart. It's taken nearly a year but the book is finally done. I've listed it as an eBook, that can be viewed in iBooks on a Mac, iPad or iPhone, but it will also be available as a physical book in hard or softcover. Here's a link to the preview (http://store.blurb.com/ebooks/522172-the-ultimate-mixing-palette-a-world-of-colours).

I have also cleaned up the charts from my previous book 'Watercolour Mixing Charts (http://www.blurb.com/b/3736881-watercolour-mixing-charts)' and re-published that in a second edition. Those 98 charts were built up over about 10 years and explore hundreds of mixes. You can also see them on my website.

Now I am looking forward to getting back into some sketching when I head off next week....

DeerDancer
06-07-2015, 02:38 PM
These are absolutely stunning! Your lines are clean and unfussy, your colours both vibrant and subdued. Just elegant and wonderful. You've totally inspired me! :thumbsup:

Quinacridone Gold
06-07-2015, 08:50 PM
These are absolutely stunning! Your lines are clean and unfussy, your colours both vibrant and subdued. Just elegant and wonderful. You've totally inspired me! :thumbsup:

Thank you DeerDancer :-)

More to add - I have finally set up a new scanner...