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View Full Version : Using Dry Gouache just like Watercolor?


HeatherDawn
01-17-2013, 05:48 PM
I've put together a little field kit of gouache paint. The paint is dry and I simply wet it to use it. I don't think I'm taking full advantage of the paint by using it this way, but want a portable solution.

Here's my question: When using gouache in this fashion, is it any different than using dry watercolor paint? To me, it doesn't seem different. Maybe I'm ingorant of the correct technique? I opted for gouache because of it's oil paint like qualities of heard of.

Any insight would be great.

Studio-1-F
01-19-2013, 03:20 PM
I've put together a little field kit of gouache paint. The paint is dry and I simply wet it to use it. I don't think I'm taking full advantage of the paint by using it this way, but want a portable solution.

Here's my question: When using gouache in this fashion, is it any different than using dry watercolor paint? To me, it doesn't seem different. Maybe I'm ingorant of the correct technique? I opted for gouache because of it's oil paint like qualities of heard of.

Any insight would be great.
Hi, HeatherDawn! I think you're correct: I don't think you're taking full advantage of the paint by using it that way. I have found that dry+re-wetted gouache does not offer the same experience as gouache fresh out of the tube. You have to really soak dry gouache to get it back to anything resembling the soft opaque creamy ooze of the fresh paint.

For me, gouache becomes portable in a mini palette kit like the one shown below. This is a snap-top food container where I use the inside of the lid as a palette, squeezing fresh gouache onto it. I try to lay out only as much as I am going to use at one sitting. It offers portability but also a place to work with fresh paint. Not as convenient as letting the paint dry in pans, but closer to the fresh-paint gouache experience. In my opinion. :thumbsup: Which is what I think you're interested in by opting for gouache because of it's oil paint like qualities. Am I right?

Jan

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http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Jan-2013/12504-gouache_plein_air.jpg

HeatherDawn
01-21-2013, 09:45 AM
Thanks for the reply, Jan. You field kit is a great idea! I think I'll try to put something like that together.

I've been experimenting with adding water a while before I paint and that has helped a lot. No where close to what I'm sure straight from the tube paint will do, though.

LarrySeiler
01-22-2013, 02:12 PM
I pick up a small bottle of glycerine at the pharmacy. A small bottle goes a long way. It keeps gouache from freezing, but extends its time from drying out as well...

HeatherDawn
01-22-2013, 03:34 PM
Thanks for the tip, Larry. How do I go about using the glycerine? Add to water? Instead of water?

karenlee
02-01-2013, 10:46 AM
I don't know where Larry went, but I will venture a guess here that you would add a drop or two of glycerine to the paint in your palette well and mix it thoroughly in with a toothpick. Hope Larry comes back to tell us what his system is....

HeatherDawn
02-01-2013, 12:29 PM
I don't know where Larry went either! haha

Thanks for the tip. I'll try mixing a couple drops of glycerin with the paint.

I have been experimenting with putting a couple drops of water in each paint well before I will be painting then covering with a damp paper towel. This has helped quite a bit but now I'm having problems with water control with the waterbrush I'm using... but that's a topic for another thread. :)

Artist_by_Accident
02-06-2013, 12:38 PM
I was curious about this also so googled it and came up with the following thread from right here at WC:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=944114

According to this, you add a bit to the paint but have to be careful not to add too much or it will be sticky.

HeatherDawn
02-06-2013, 01:52 PM
Oh, good find! Thanks!!

Merritt
02-11-2013, 03:10 AM
harry were are you harrrrrrryyyyyy I couldnt resist lol