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View Full Version : Framing - Pastel picture:glass or not?


marina
03-05-2001, 11:54 AM
I have two very pretty small pastel pictures that I would love to frame and was wondering if a glass is necessary. Seems like it would since the colors are so delicate and don't seem to "dry". I would just look so much prettier without a glass. Suggestions?
Thanks

Roan
03-05-2001, 11:57 AM
Marina:

All pastels need to be framed under glass to protect them from the elements.

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<FONT face="Script MT Bold"><FONT COLOR="#AB4835"><FONT size="5">Roan</FONT s></FONT c></FONT f>
<FONT COLOR="#8A1010">Call caraid tadhal tric, 's call caraid tadhal ainmig.</FONT c>
-- <FONT size="1">Friends are lost by calling often, and by calling seldom.</FONT s>
RoanStudio.com (http://RoanStudio.com) &lt;-- pastel open stock vendor sources & reviews!

VictoriaS
03-05-2001, 02:38 PM
Glass - definitely. Make sure it's real glass, not plexiglass (which will attract particles of pastel dust), and you need a mat or spacers of some sort so that the picture is not touching the glass.
Victoria

Ohju
03-05-2001, 05:56 PM
Most definitly I agree with Roan. Also before framing seal your piece with a fixative so it won't smudge on the glass. I use Grumbacher Tuffilm Final Fixative. If I'm in the process, and want to seal the work til it's completed (for less smudging), I use Kylon Workable Fixatif 1306. Hope this helps. ~Ju

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It's only ART...but I like IT!

Roan
03-05-2001, 08:53 PM
Ack, Ohju! We don't know if Marina is a beginner or no, so recommending fixative could lead to disaster.

Marina:
If you decide to take Ohju's advice, EXPERIMENT with fixative on something you don't want FIRST before you try it on your paintings. Don't just go ahead and do that -- you could ruin them.

Fixative can and usually will change the colors in the painting. Especially if you've never used it before.

I don't use fixative, myself. Don't like what it does to the look of the painting.

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<FONT face="Script MT Bold"><FONT COLOR="#AB4835"><FONT size="5">Roan</FONT s></FONT c></FONT f>
<FONT COLOR="#8A1010">Call caraid tadhal tric, 's call caraid tadhal ainmig.</FONT c>
-- <FONT size="1">Friends are lost by calling often, and by calling seldom.</FONT s>
RoanStudio.com (http://RoanStudio.com) &lt;-- pastel open stock vendor sources & reviews!

marina
03-06-2001, 08:55 AM
Thanks so much for your replies. I am a beginner, and I like to do watercolors. I love all kinds of art though,and I enjoy this web site inmensely.

bk7251
03-06-2001, 02:41 PM
NIX TO FIX

I strongly recommend NOT fixing a finished pastel. While useful during the working process - if used sparingly - fixing a finished work can alter the appearance, and is totally unnecessary for work framed under glass.

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Barry Katz

LDianeJohnson
03-06-2001, 03:13 PM
HI marina,

Here are some suggestions:

1. Absolutely, glass over pastels. Clear glass only, avoid "non-glare" as this is ok for photos but with the crystallization effect will "kill" pastel paintings or drawings. Plexi is also not recommended unless shipping, as it will attract pastel particles to itself due to static.

2. To spray or not to spray...ahh...the question everyone asks. I recommend not spraying on final paintings. Some fixatives lighten, some darken pastels...ALL change and alter pastel paintings. Once the particles are "wetted" even the least little bit, they puddle and flatten. Sort of the difference between salt, and cooking an egg, as I learned way back in chemistry class. Salt will reconstitute itself as a crystal. Pastel is not like salt. It is more like an egg...once it is cooked, it cannot be uncooked http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif You'd have to rework the area to bring it back.

So, with this in mind, can you ever spray pastels? Of course. When working in layers of pastel, there is no reason not to lightly spray or "fix" the surface to give back some of the tooth lost to overworking.

I sometimes spray between layers of "building" my paintings. And even spot spraying. But always--only if needed. If you don't need to spray, it's better not to.

One thing that will help in lessening the necessity to spray is using a surface from the start that has a deeper tooth. If you use very soft pastel or a heavy application of paint, consider a sanded board with or specially prepared surface.

Half the fun with pastel is the discovery of what works for you and what does not.

Happy Painting,

Diane

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L. Diane Johnson (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/) NAPA, PSA
Plein Air Workshops (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/workshops/)