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Keith Russell
08-06-2003, 03:20 AM
OK, to go along with the 'favourite authors' thread, what is everyone reading at the moment?

me...

Freedom Evolves, by Daniel Dennett

Focault's Pendulum, by Umberto Eco
--for the third time

The Bible Unearthed, by Finkelstein & Silberman

The Two Towers, by J. R. R. Tolkein
--for the fourth or fifth time

The Artist's Way, by Julia Cameron

K

MikLNjLo
08-06-2003, 05:43 AM
Hawthorne on Painting by Mrs. Charles W. Hawthorne

In Words by Yanni

The Operator by Tom King

A Life in the Arts by Eric Maisel

Future Noir by Paul M. Sammon

Gruppe on Color by Emile Gruppe

sue ellen
08-06-2003, 10:22 AM
Ishmael Daniel Quinn

Power Trip U.S. Unilateralism And Global Strategy After Septermber 11 Edited by John Feffer

Illusions The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah Richard Bach

The Myth Of The Eternal Return Mircea Eliade

tao paths harmony Solala Towler

The Blank Canvas Anna Held Audette

Stoy Jones
08-06-2003, 10:25 AM
I picked up a used book called, "Guide to Drawing" by Mendelowitz and Wakeham. The store is near a university, so it may have been a textbook years ago. I'm also working on "Before the Animation Begins" by John Canemaker.

Stoy

Maysun
08-06-2003, 11:34 AM
Here's the recent list :

Painting:A Creative Approach - by Norman Colquhoun.

History of Italian Renaissance Art - by Frederick Hartt (Great Tome)

The Agony and the Ecstacy - Irving Stone (love this book)

The Autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini (I was so PLEASED when I found this book - had a tug-of-war with a woman who wanted it too - luckily there were two copies !)

Seven Years in Tibet - by Heinrich Harrer

The Rubaiyat - by Omar Khayyam (I keep dipping into it)

Dakshin Rang (Southern Colours) - by Mina Prabhu (She is a London-based travel writer, and this is a book in the Marathi language about her travels in South America, very funny and engrossing)

Anyone read Turks Fruit by Jan Wolkers ? One of my dutch friends was VERY upset I hadn't even heard of it.

Maysun:)

Thanks for your lists, by the way, people, I'll try and read all the books as I find them.

Rose Queen
08-06-2003, 02:33 PM
Structure of the Visual Book by Keith A. Smith

Mary Coulter: Architect of the Southwest by Arnold Berke

The Van Gogh Blues by Eric Maisel

Portraits: Talking with Artists at the Met, the Modern, the Louvre and Elsewhere by Michael Kimmelman

Bad Press: The Worst Critical Reviews Ever by Laura Ward



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judithj
08-06-2003, 06:02 PM
Surrender to God Within - by Eva Pierrakos
Mists of Avalon - Marian Bradely Zimmer

Elven Prince
08-06-2003, 09:14 PM
hmmmmm

Wounded Spirit... Very interesting so far

Lord of the Rings...... 2nd time so far. Currently on Fellowship of the Rings

I want to start on Chronicles of Narnia and Robin Hood but Im a slow reader as it is!:o :D

kduncan
08-06-2003, 10:25 PM
I just finished "Michelangelo & the Pope's Ceiling" by Ross King and am currently reading "What went wrong? The clash between Islam and Modernity in the Middle east" by Bernard Lewis.

I recommend the first book to anyone interested in Michelangelo and/or his work in the Sistine chapel, wonderful insight into the politics of the times (and of the job) and the people involved.

mame
08-07-2003, 08:55 AM
"Africran Rhythm and African Sensibility", John Miller Chernoff
explores the nature of African music and the importance it has within the flow of African social life

"Critical Aesthetics and PostModernism", Paul Crowthers

"Food Mania, - An extraordinary visual record of the art of food from kitchen garden to banqueting table", Nigel Garwood and Rainer Voigt
-a montage of paintings, photographs and illustrations, traces its way through the history of food. (wonderful, well reproduced plates, old newspaper illustrations, paintings, drawings etc.
For example: illustrations from Jules Gouffe's "Le Livve de cuisine", Paris, 1867, "Fruit Picking, chromolithograph, Germany, c.1880

Browsing a complete collection of 1980's Art News magazines given to me by a friend

"Me Talk Pretty One Day", David Sedaris

DanaT
08-07-2003, 09:28 AM
Just started re reading The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco. Just finished reading the Twin Towers, in the midst of rereading Celestine Prophecies. This is the summer to read things over. :)

RobinZ
08-07-2003, 11:15 AM
Elven said:

I want to start on Chronicles of Narnia and Robin Hood but Im a slow reader as it is!

Get the movie (Robin Hood). Erol Flynn. The best. :D

Keith Russell
08-07-2003, 03:29 PM
Name of the Rose, good--very good.

Focault's Pendulum, better...

K

DanaT
08-07-2003, 03:36 PM
Nah! Foucaults Pendulum kinda threw everything but the kitchen sink, but it was as enjoyable as a book could be without a plot. Name of the Rose had a more coherent storyline.

CarrieStuartParks
08-07-2003, 04:13 PM
Originally posted by Elven Prince
hmmmmm

Wounded Spirit... Very interesting so far



Hi-Is that Wounded Spirit by Frank Peretti? He's a close friend.
-Carrie

Keith Russell
08-07-2003, 05:35 PM
Dana, I guess its just a case of tom-AY-toe vs. tom-AH-toe.

K

Elven Prince
08-07-2003, 06:24 PM
Get the movie (Robin Hood). Erol Flynn. The best. LOL Ive seen it! My sister is like in love with him! LOL

Hi-Is that Wounded Spirit by Frank Peretti? He's a close friend. Yah it is. Are you serious?!?!:eek: Awsome!!! Im gonna start on piercing the darkness soon. :D

CarrieStuartParks
08-07-2003, 06:53 PM
Hi Scott,
The Visitation is a good book--I like it because he loosely based it on his own life (and, of course, we're loosely in it!). Barb (Frank's wife) and I just did an art show together--we shared a double booth. Barb is quite a wonderful watercolor artist.

His new kid series Nightmare Academy and Hangman's Curse are also based on my family's work in forensics. It's been a wonderful experience knowing them--and being their Wednesday night Bible study partners.

Best wishes,
Carrie

Nihil_Initio
08-07-2003, 09:36 PM
My reads (when I can get around to it...I'm on the computer FAR too much)

The Blank Canvas by Anna Held Audette for the third time.

Newdow vs US Congress, et al. Opinions of 9th Circuit Court Of Appeals regarding the striking down of the "Under God" Clause of the Pledge of Alleigence. Very interesting reading, along with:

Lawrence et al. vs Texas Opinions of US Supreme Court regarding the constitutionality of anti-sodomy laws

Trust the process: an artist's guide to letting go by Shaun McNiff. Its okay, the author is kind of wordy and pedantic.

the Creative Artist: the Fine artist's guide to expanding your creativity by Nita Leland. Pretty good book; she gives LOTS of activitys meant to help bust down a block

Spectrum 9:the best in contemporary fantastic art edited by Cathy and Arnie Fenner; the ninth installment of an annual anthology of fantasy and sci-fi art, for the year 2001. I cant WAIT for 2002 and 2003!!! These artists are SO FANTASTIC.

Elements of Fiction Writing: Plot by Ansen Dibell. A writer's guide

Thats it.
Nihil

Ron van den Boogaard
08-08-2003, 08:00 AM
Originally posted by Maysun
Anyone read Turks Fruit by Jan Wolkers ? One of my dutch friends was VERY upset I hadn't even heard of it.


and rightly so, good stuff for artists. I did see the movie as well (directed by Paul Verhoeven with Rutger Hauer)

Currently reading
the 22 unmutable laws of marketing by Al Ries and Jack Trout

before that
SoHo by Kasteleanitz

timelady
08-08-2003, 03:20 PM
Just finished The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen

Train book: Mona Lisa, Donald Sassoon
Bedtime book: Barry Trotter and the Shameless Parody, Michael Gerber (no, really, it's quite funny! And a bit more, um, adult.)

But most time for reading is given over to my studies at the moment. I'm on Book 7 of my physics class - Quantum Physics: An Introduction. There's some cool looking things in these lists.. that I'll probably never get around to checking out of the library!

Tina.

J.W.
08-08-2003, 05:03 PM
Judas Goat and Shrink Rap by Robert B. Parker.

American Gods by Neil Gaiman.

Beginning Death in the Afternoon by Hemmingway.

Plus the usual assortment of comics and magazines.

Pilan
08-08-2003, 06:06 PM
I have been thumbing through a 1962 book called
Selected Stories and Poems by Edgar Allan Poe.
Great selection of stories too.
I really love his style. My granddaughter got a good whiff of The Raven night before last. She had lots of questions. I enjoyed reading it to her.

Treason by Anne Coulton
She blasts right off no warming up or anything!

I have the hardback 3 volumes and its a long running read ---- The Van Gogh Letters 1/3 through the first volume

I am wanting to know if anyone has read The DaVinci Code.
A friend of mine highly recommended it to me. If you read it what do you think it?


ooo what is the The Blank Canvas about????

artgorillagal
08-08-2003, 09:53 PM
I'm currently reading the huge catelogue for Gerhardt Richter's exhibition I was fortunate to see last summer. I glanced at some pictures, said "hmm" very profoundly and put it away. Now I'm reading every works and looking at the pictures over and over again. It should take a month. I read several things at once so I have to confess to my fun reading - Janet Evanovich's new mystery "To the Nines" (which I love!) and about 8 monthly periodicals are open including 3 art magazines, Prevention, Oprah, Reader's Digest (could that possibly even count?) and Arizona Highways. I recently found old magazines so I am going through 70s "Heresies" which is fun.

mpopinz
08-08-2003, 10:04 PM
A Course in Miracles - Helen Schucman & William Thetford - Professors of Medical Psychology - Columbia University

The Order of the Phoenix - Rowling

Jeanne C
08-09-2003, 08:23 AM
At the moment:
Dropped Threads-Volume 2. An anthology of writings/personal reflections by women that touch on life's defining moments.
Edited by Carol Shields and Marjorie Anderson

Just finished:
Writing from the Body. A book about spirit, creativity and the inner life of a writer. For writers, artists and dreamers who long to free their voice.
John Lee with Ceci Miller-Kritsberg

Next on the agenda:
I picked these two up while browsing a used book store the other day.
Cat's Eye ~Margaret Atwood~
The Second Self...Computers and the Human Spirit ~Sherry Turkle~

heh
08-09-2003, 10:38 AM
a friend sent me a book on hundertwasser recently
that has me smiling

still going through iris murdoch's existentialists and mystics

constantly rereading what poetry i have
right now, the book of orgasms, and spontaneous breasts
by nin andrews

SparrowHawk
08-10-2003, 04:50 AM
Recently finished Michael Shermer's Why People Believe Weird Things.

Just wrapping up Too Loud, Too Bright, Too Fast, Too Tight by Sharon Heller, a book on Sensory Defensiveness.

Leon Lederman's The God Particle and
Synaptic Self by Joseph LeDoux

Hm. I seem to be favoring a cognitive/scientific streak at present.

SanDL
08-10-2003, 09:41 AM
Just finshed "The Flanders Panel" by Arturo Perez-Reverte
If you like art, chess and philosophy and mysteries this is a good book. I was sad to finish it.

sgtaylor
08-10-2003, 10:45 AM
I recently finished reading TSOG: The Thing That Ate The Constitution by Robert Anton Wilson. Not his best - a lot of interesting points as usual, but nothing really in-depth. Lately I'm finding him to be a great source for quotes and one-liners, but he has pretty much abandoned connected, in-depth reporting or argument. Many of the short chapters I had already read on his web site - www.rawilson.com

I am almost finished Turn On Tune In Drop Out by Timothy Leary. It's a collection of speeches and essays from the early 60s that I somehow managed to miss at the time. If one can get past a certain naive, silly quality - as well as overlook some predictions that were far too radical to be taken seriously even then - the book contains some fascinating ideas. Leary was certainly his own worst enemy. Many of his ideas and observations are worthy of serious consideration, but his reputation and style of presentation make it too easy to turn him off and tune him out. Of course, this is a complaint that can be raised with most of the counter-culture writers of the time.

I found an online copy of Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe that I have been reading at work while waiting on interminably long computer updates. I've not read it before, and I'm a little surprised to find that it is not as in-your-face as I had expected it to be. I suppose I was expecting a sort of hard-hitting, modern polemical fiction. I am enjoying the subtle, fair handed treatment, but my 20th century mind seems to wander. So much of what I read these days takes a whack-you-upside-the-head approach to things that I get a little bored with the subtle, slow buildup. It worries me a bit.

Last on my list at the moment is The Built-Up Ship Model by Charles G. Davis. I've had a lifelong on again - off again love affair with 16th century sailing vessels. At the moment, it's on again.

Of course, I'm always poking my nose into bits and pieces of other books. I probably do more scatter-shot research than cover to cover reading. The Debate on the Constitution is never too far away, as well as the collected writings of Ben Franklin and Thomas Jefferson. At the moment, my desk is littered with books about ancient Egyptian art.

Oh! I forgot to mention Gregoran Chant by Willi Apel. I've been reading it on and off for months. Talk about in-depth! I hope to finish it - and understand it - within this lifetime. (Very technical... very boring. ;) )

DanaT
08-10-2003, 10:51 AM
Originally posted by sgtaylor
At the moment, my desk is littered with books about ancient Egyptian art.

Fascinating sarge. Do you see the influence on your own artwork?

O'Connor
08-10-2003, 12:06 PM
Crime & Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Maysun
08-10-2003, 12:06 PM
Originally posted by Ron van den Boogaard


and rightly so, good stuff for artists. I did see the movie as well (directed by Paul Verhoeven with Rutger Hauer)



Rutger Hauer - in that case, I'm going to try see this movie - there'll be a version with english subtitles ? - really like that guy - I have two of his movies 'Escape from Sobibor' and 'Inside the Third Reich' - have the books too.

You know I read a book The Reichmarshall - about Goering - by Leonard Mosley - I wonder if he's any relation to the British Nazi Oswald Mosley - he certainly tried to white-wash him.

'Charmed Lives' and 'Another Life : A Memoir of Other People' by Michael Korda are also entertaining reads.

And 'The Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter' by Simone de Beauvoir.
'Surviving Picasso' by Francoise Gilot.
'Islands in the Stream' by Hemingway.
'Walden' by Thoreau.
Rereading my Louis L'Amours currently - I'm a great fan of Westerns.

Maysun :)

sgtaylor
08-10-2003, 02:07 PM
Originally posted by DanaT
Fascinating sarge. Do you see the influence on your own artwork?

The influence has always been there, but it's usually difficult to see. I think a lot of my figurative work is heavily influenced by Egyptian sculpture. There is a power and majesty about it that attracts me immediately. My figures tend to be stiff rather than graceful - I try for a frozen moment, straining against some inner strength and power - but I only rarely copy Egyptian poses or proportions... occasionally if I'm trying to be obvious for some reason, but I try to avoid it.

I have long been fascinated by hieroglyphics, and have often considered doing a painting that could actually be read if one knew the key, but I've not yet figured out how to make it work both as text and illustration. It may be too big a task... but the idea won't leave me alone.

mame
08-11-2003, 10:07 AM
Originally posted by sgtaylor


The influence has always been there, but it's usually difficult to see. I think a lot of my figurative work is heavily influenced by Egyptian sculpture. There is a power and majesty about it that attracts me immediately. My figures tend to be stiff rather than graceful - I try for a frozen moment, straining against some inner strength and power - but I only rarely copy Egyptian poses or proportions... occasionally if I'm trying to be obvious for some reason, but I try to avoid it.

I have long been fascinated by hieroglyphics, and have often considered doing a painting that could actually be read if one knew the key, but I've not yet figured out how to make it work both as text and illustration. It may be too big a task... but the idea won't leave me alone.

Thinking "abstractly" (the only word I can think of to use here), and your hieroglyphics idea, I once did a "painting" of a Sestina I wrote. Each "word" was represented by a particular color - and there was a corresponding "key" to identify/correlate color to word.

The words were represented by horizontal bars and the size/or length of the bar corresponded to the number of letters in a word, i.e., the word "and" was a bar exactly the size of the word in 18 size font (if you were typing it).

Does this make sense? It was of course a nightmare/more right brain than I was born with but it was a fascinating exercise.

Perry
08-11-2003, 11:13 AM
Valley of the Silent Men - James Curwood

Adam Bede - George Eliot

Dennis

vklum
08-11-2003, 11:50 AM
Well, my summer reading has been mostly textbooks...I only just finished summer term a week and a half ago. So, I've read "Critical Thinking," "America at Odds," "Celebrity Politics" (by Darrell West & John Orman), and Ronald Takaki's "Strangers from a Different Shore" (about the experiences of Asians immigrating to the US).

After all of that "weight" I needed something a bit easier on the brain, so I read "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix."

And right now, I'm making my way through art/business books. I just got asked again if I'm a professional photographer (evidently, I take really good pictures... :p ), and since I'm still scratching around for rent and cat food money, I need to get my butt in gear and BE a professional photographer.

Alas, in another week and a half, it's back into textbook "h-e-double hockey sticks"...if I can afford the darn things!

MsLilypond
08-11-2003, 02:00 PM
I'm rereading my Terry Pratchett books
and am going to read Janet Evanakovitch's new book, 'to the nines'

my fiancee's reading Faust

Keith Russell
08-11-2003, 02:43 PM
Ms. Lily, Faust has been on my list for a long time, but it is difficult to find an unabridged copy these days.

Any suggestions?

Thanks,

K

Maysun
08-11-2003, 02:59 PM
Light a Distant Fire - by Lucia St. Clair Robson - about the Seminole Indians - great book !

Surely, You're Joking, Mr. Feynman ! - by Richard Feynman - really like this chap - taught himself to draw rather well, you know.

The Philosophy of Art - Curt John Ducasse - plodding through:D


Maysun :)

MsLilypond
08-12-2003, 10:57 AM
Ms. Lily, Faust has been on my list for a long time, but it is difficult to find an unabridged copy these days.


I think my fiancee has the unabridge edition, he got it off ebay,
you may want to try their sister site half.com, and you can start a wishlist and they will contact you when one becomes available.

Keith Russell
08-12-2003, 11:51 AM
Ms. Lily!

Thanks, I'll check that out!

K

vklum
08-12-2003, 04:12 PM
Keith, you might also give Powell's Books (http://www.powells.com) a try. Check both the "regular" site and in their Rare Books Room.

ordie4
08-13-2003, 12:17 PM
bland ambition....

documents the ups and downs, funny stories and criminal behavior of every vice-president. amusing read!

Maysun
08-13-2003, 12:32 PM
Keith, you'll find Faust - part 1 in e-book format at the following sites - their books are free and legal and they have a good collection.

http://gutenberg.net or
http://promo.net/pg

Maysun

Keith Russell
08-13-2003, 07:29 PM
Thanks, everyone!

K

StoneCarver
08-15-2003, 03:11 PM
Eco is one of my favorite writers, one of my grad school profs turned me on to his work, plus I saw the movie. I also read a bunch of T. Leary's stuff back in the day.

Currently reading:

~Titan - autobio of Rockefeller

~Gothic Art - I'm not sure who wrote it

~Qualitative Research Methods - I teach this stuff

~Perdido Street Station - China Meiville (very dark, layered, SciFi)

~Leadership Moments - for some research I'm doing

and an autobio of Jerzy Kosinsky

Now that I look at the list I can see why I can never remember where I left off in any one book.

nancyw
08-15-2003, 04:36 PM
Hi Ms Lilypond. I was introduced to Terry Pratchett books in San Simeon CA. Have read every one I can beg, borrow, or well---. Have you read MacAvoy. I like her stuff. Evanovich is wonderful. In1999 a lady staying in the same campground as I was insisted I read all of the first four. Could not put them down. Love Lulu in that series and Grandma Mazur.

blkros
08-16-2003, 09:58 PM
Ship of Fools -- Richard Paul Russo
Do I Come Here Often -- Henry Rollins
Algebra for College Students --Mark Dugopolski
Forge of the Elders -- L Neil Smith
Various magazines including--2600 quarterly, Wired, Juxtapoz, Wegway, Linux Journal.
The Poetry thread over in debates is making me itch to read Paradise Lost again, so that'll be happening soon.

DanaT
08-17-2003, 09:27 AM
Originally posted by StoneCarver
Eco is one of my favorite writers, one of my grad school profs turned me on to his work, plus I saw the movie. I also read a bunch of T. Leary's stuff back in the day.


If you like Eco, try out another Northern Italian author, Italo Calvino. Under the Jaguar Sun and If on a Winter Night, A Traveler are especially good.

J.W.
08-17-2003, 12:46 PM
Started reading Early Autumn by Robert B. Parker.

Also working my way through Webster's Dictionary. A bit thin on plot and character development, but fascinating nonetheless.:D

Matt

DanaT
08-17-2003, 02:50 PM
Dictionary of English Word Origins is even more fascinating.

blkros
08-17-2003, 04:33 PM
Try the OXford English Dictionary--Unabridged. Heavy man! :D

Trilliann
08-21-2003, 03:40 PM
The Cat In The Hat, by Dr. Seuss - out loud, for my 2-year-old.

Developing and Implementing Web Applications with Visual Basic .NET and Visual Studio .NET Exam Cram 2 (Exam 70-305), By Mike Gunderloy. (you don't need to read this one!)

Nemesis, by Isaac Asimov - when there's any time left for my silly self!

KamaraDesigns
08-24-2003, 01:04 AM
Wow...I am so happy to see that I am one of many with a list of currently reading books!! My husband laughs at the pile of books by my bed stand!

A Midsummer Nights Dream - Shakespeare

Speaker for the Dead - Orson Scott Card

The Crisis of Islam - Bernard Lewis

The Dark Side of Camelot - Seymour Hersh

The Artist's Complete Guide to Figure Drawing - Anthony Ryder

Drawing with Children - Mona Brooks

Order of the Phoenix - JK Rowling (Started reading this series to find out what my 13 yr old step daughter was reading...trying to stay in touch with the teenagers and all that...now I just need to find out what's going on with Harry :rolleyes: )

And I have a PILE of 'To Read'...Dereliction of Duty, Taming of the Shrew, Much Ado About Nothing, As You Like It (I've read all Shakespeare's tragedies so now I'm moving on the the comedies), Children of Dune, Surviving Picasso (read this once awhile ago but wanted to back through it again), Essential Picasso, and the list goes on...

Kim

Julies
08-24-2003, 09:35 AM
"His new kid series Nightmare Academy and Hangman's Curse are also based on my family's work in forensics. It's been a wonderful experience knowing them--and being their Wednesday night Bible study partners. "

Got me interested Carrie, now I'll be buying these books to read and then pass along to my 12 and 10 year old!
:p
Julie

Julies
08-24-2003, 09:53 AM
[Wow...I am so happy to see that I am one of many with a list of currently reading books!! My husband laughs at the pile of books by my bed stand! ]

My husband looked at my Art books a few years ago, and said,
"some of those belong to the library.......right?"

I had to laugh. I don't keep a lot on my nightstand, but I do LOVE books! these days, with 4 kids, ages 12 to 8 months, there's not a lot of time though.
:rolleyes:
Julie

KamaraDesigns
08-24-2003, 09:12 PM
Originally posted by Julies
[Wow...I am so happy to see that I am one of many with a list of currently reading books!! My husband laughs at the pile of books by my bed stand! ]

My husband looked at my Art books a few years ago, and said,
"some of those belong to the library.......right?"

I had to laugh. I don't keep a lot on my nightstand, but I do LOVE books! these days, with 4 kids, ages 12 to 8 months, there's not a lot of time though.
:rolleyes:
Julie

Wow...four kids...I have my hands full with two...that's why the books are still by the bedstand and not back on the shelf...and that the pile keeps growing!! :)

Julies
08-24-2003, 10:43 PM
Wow...four kids...I have my hands full with two...that's why the books are still by the bedstand and not back on the shelf...and that the pile keeps growing!!

Your kids are probably young. I have 12, 10, 6, and 8 mos., so the two older girls can spot me from time to time. I meant to say also that we used Drawing with Children in our Art program when I was home schooling the 2 older kids. It was really a very good program.

I love to read the books our two older kids are reading, so I read less adult books than I'd like, but there will be a time when it'll probably look funny for me to read from the young adult section, so I'll do it now. My daughter brought home a list of summer reading... teacher's favorites, and guess who read them.....
:rolleyes: I love the Harry Potter series, although with book 5 I was disappointed that the relationship between Harry, Ron, and Hermione wasn't as strong as in the 1st three. Can't wait for book 6. :D

Julie

KamaraDesigns
08-24-2003, 11:07 PM
Originally posted by Julies


Your kids are probably young. I have 12, 10, 6, and 8 mos., so the two older girls can spot me from time to time. I meant to say also that we used Drawing with Children in our Art program when I was home schooling the 2 older kids. It was really a very good program.

I love to read the books our two older kids are reading, so I read less adult books than I'd like, but there will be a time when it'll probably look funny for me to read from the young adult section, so I'll do it now. My daughter brought home a list of summer reading... teacher's favorites, and guess who read them.....
:rolleyes: I love the Harry Potter series, although with book 5 I was disappointed that the relationship between Harry, Ron, and Hermione wasn't as strong as in the 1st three. Can't wait for book 6. :D

Julie

Yea...my kids are 3 and 4...and I can't wait for them to start school full time...just kidding (kind of) ;) . I could use a spotter!! I have a 14 year old step daughter and when she stays with us it's a great help.

I picked up the drawing with children because my daughter seems to have inherited the art bug and shows a lot of skill. I was looking for a way to communicate some of what I learned in art lessons and art school. The book seems to be very good...I've only just started reading it but it gives me the words I need to communicate with her.

I think it's a good idea to read the books our kids are reading, if we haven't already. Inevitably they are going to be asking for help with them and it also gives us parents another avenue to talk with them. Books are great topics for discussion.

I like Harry Potter but I think my step daughter misses all the subtleties in the books. She's focused only on what happens in the end. I'm trying to get her to notice the Greek Mythology and biblical references...and all of the little word games being played. It's fun conversation for us and gives us neutral ground.

Julies
08-24-2003, 11:50 PM
Yea...my kids are 3 and 4...and I can't wait for them to start school full time...just kidding (kind of) . I could use a spotter!! I have a 14 year old step daughter and when she stays with us it's a great help.

Having the older kids is wonderful, they can be really helpful.
(can be!) :rolleyes: Last year, I homeschooled our 10 yog, and she loved to help with the baby, and in our 5 yob's Kindergarten class. Now, she'll be in school too, and all three will be in school. I'll have the baby at home, but it will be a huge change....that I'm looking forward to.

Good for you trying to find the common, neutral ground with your step-daughter. I imagine that can be difficult, but I admire you for trying.
Julie

pampe
08-26-2003, 03:25 PM
Meditation as Medicine by Singh Khalsa MD for my RA

Like Pilan...about 1/3 through the 1st volume of VanGogh's letters

Cane River by Lalita Tademy for reading group this month

Blue and Yelllow don't make green (because I should)

CREATIVE PAINTING with PASTEL by Katchen to learn





Read DaVinci code....great beginning, slow middle, weak ending

DesertDreamer
08-28-2003, 11:17 AM
I generally "live" in the glass forums, but lurk here a lot. Guess it's time to jump in!

I've been on a light summer reading kick. Serious stuff is for cold weather. Just finished Courting Trouble by Lisa Scottoline and Full Tilt by Janet Evanovich. Now I'm on to The Last Full Measure by Jeff Shaara. Bedtime reading (with my kids) is A Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula LeGuin. I'm working hard to turn them on to "classic" fantasy and science fiction.

Maysun
08-28-2003, 01:40 PM
Memoirs of Casanova - Giacomo Casanova.


Maysun:)

MsLilypond
08-29-2003, 08:42 AM
Well since I posted last, I have finished those books and am now reading Don Quixote by Cervantes and also finished a book by James Harriet, All creatures great and small (at least I think that's the title)

vklum
08-29-2003, 04:49 PM
Well, it's a new school term so the "official" reading list is:

"Essentials of Physical Anthropology" by Jurmain, Kilgore, Trevathan & Nelson;

"Earth Science" by Tarbuck & Lutgens; and

"Elementary Algebra for College Students" (for what I call my "algebra for dummies" class) by Angel.

And when I can drop them in, I'm working my way through "Bloody Mary" by Carroly Erickson and various art/business books ('cuz I need to start making some money soon!)

Eugene Veszely
09-30-2003, 02:56 AM
"Drawing on the Artist Within" by Betty Edwards.

"Cracking Creativity" by Michael Michalko

"How to think like Leonardo Da Vinci" by Michael Gelb

All of them are must read books!!! :):)

shootydog
10-03-2003, 09:56 AM
"Black House" by Stephen King and Peter Straub

recently finished

"American Gods" by Neil Gaiman

"Enders Game" by Orson Scott Card

Keith Russell
10-21-2003, 04:44 PM
Logic and Mysticism, by Bertrand Russell

The Two Towers, by Tolkein

Surrealism and Painting, by Andre Breton

K

Eugene Veszely
10-22-2003, 12:48 AM
"Buzan's Book of Genius and how to Unleash Your Own"~~ by Tony Buzan and Raymond Keene

Smileawhyl
10-22-2003, 11:08 PM
[i]Dude, Where's My Country[\i] by Michael Moore

Andrew
10-23-2003, 12:36 PM
I just finished The Corpse had a Familiar Face by Edna Buchanan, The Study and Interpretation of Blood Splatter Data (a college text) and Slaughter House Five by Kurt Vonnegut.

Currently I am reading:
How I Got This Way Patrick F. McManus
Hawthorne on Painting by Charles Hawthorne
The Art Spirit by Robert Henri

On my to read list:
Statistical Quality Control by Montgomery (Yes it is just as interesting as it sounds)
Centaur Aisle by Piers Anthony (for the umpteenth time)
and an assortment of books on Art Techniques and Artists.

Andrew

p.s. What is The Blank Canvas (by Anna Held Audette) about?

paintergirl
10-23-2003, 08:02 PM
Just finished Art & Fear by David Bayles and Ted Orland.

Currently re-reading The Graphic Work of M.C Escher

The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison.
Any Given Day byJesse Lee Brown Foveaux
A Jest of God by Margaret Laurence

Rose Queen
10-23-2003, 08:12 PM
Originally posted by Andrew
p.s. What is The Blank Canvas (by Anna Held Audette) about?

The subtitle of this book is Inviting the Muse and it's advice for those with artist's block or other creative expression problems. It's short and practical.



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pampe
10-26-2003, 10:14 PM
Just finished ANGELS AND DEMONS by DAN BROWN for book group

UNDER THE BANNER OF HEAVEN (powerful and scary)

KANDINSKY ON SPIRITUALITY AND ART (huh?)

WINTERING by MOSES ( a novel of Sylvia Plath)

The BIG BOOK OF OIL PAINTING
WELCOME TO MY STUDIO
PAINTING WITH WATER SOLUBLE OILS

(cause I have to)

;)