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Iona
08-05-2003, 12:56 PM
Can someone tell me where to find information on photocopy etching on metal? I would like to know how to do this and need directions. Iona

timelady
08-07-2003, 03:03 PM
Do you mean photo-etching? That is a technique of its own. I don't know how to do it Im' afraid! But try a search online on photo-etching or photoetching and you might get some links that are useful. :)

If you just mean copying an image on to metal I don't know of any precise way. I usually sketch straight onto the plate with a pencil and then work around the sketch. But I'm doing drypoint - it wouldn't work with regular etching because you need to degrease the plate and graphite is quite 'greasy' and could be left on the plate for the acid bath. :( Sorry I can't be of more help! (and sorry if some of this is fuzzy, it's been a long time since I did a proper etching)

Tina.

Iona
08-07-2003, 07:38 PM
Thanks, Tina, I will try to search and see if I come up with anything. At the Bead & Button someone was teaching a class in photocopy etching, but I was unable to get into the class, it filled up so fast. In fact all her classes in other techniques filled as fast. It sounded interesting and something I thought I'd like to try. It almost made me wonder if it is a safer method than with the acid bath.?? Iona

dune daisy
08-26-2003, 06:01 PM
You can use xerox copies of your work, and use a hot plate to heat your plate. If you look at picturetrail.com/dunedaisyartworks and go to the Hokey Pokey folder, you will see photos of my artist book doing the Hokey Pokey. All of the pictures were done that way and etched in ferris chloride. I only use copper as I am afraid of the acids that one has to use with any of the other metal plates. if you write to me directly, I will try to give you more inclusive information. Syd

Huygens
09-07-2003, 12:10 AM
Therre arre three or four ways to do this, and none of them arre all that technically difficult.

1) Look up either Ganoskin or Glass and Metal Magazine on the Internet. These are two jewelrs' forums. Both of them have extensive information on PhP paper for transfering designs to metal. Glass and Metal Magazine has truly extensive information, as etched metal is widely used by enamelists to do champleve work.

2) You can silk screen on a resist. You make a photo silk screen (any art store can explain how you do this) frrom your drawing and then silk screen the resist directly on the metal.

3) Kodak KTFR. You apply this to the metal, drop your drawing on it, expose it to light, wash off everrything unnecessary and you are ready to etch.

I can't emphasize how extensively these methods are used in industry. I personally have used methods two and three to etch glass, which is much more difficult (and dangerous) than etching metal. For metal, the PhP paper method (which is used for etching circuit boards commercially) sounds particularly easy and promising to me.

Huygens

Huygens
09-07-2003, 12:25 AM
1) Look up either Ganoskin or Glass and Metal Magazine on the Internet. These are two jewelrs' forums. Both of them have extensive information on PhP paper for transfering designs to metal. Glass and Metal Magazine has truly extensive information, as etched metal is widely used by enamelists to do champleve work.


Ooops!!! Sorry, I meant "PnP" paper instead of what I wrote.
Here is the URL to Glass on Metal Magazine

http://glass-on-metal.com/main.htm

Look up the following article in their arrticles section--

"Etching with PnP Paper" by Katherine S.Wood.

There are also one or two other articles there by her on using PnP paper as well as several other articles on etching. Enamelists have to etch much deeperr than print makes, so anything that works for enamalists will work well for print making.

Huygens

Iona
09-07-2003, 01:32 PM
Thanks Huygen, I will check the information you provided. Iona