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mr sad
08-13-2012, 03:16 PM
I scanned the learning center and did a quick cursory search for this subject, so if I missed a thread about it, apologies.

Does anyone have any tips or some demonstratory paintings for rendering fire in pastels? I had an idea to do a study of the many recent wildfires in the US. (Though such a study would be way beyond me at the moment, I still like the idea!)

SSB
08-13-2012, 03:57 PM
I think like the sun, the way to make it brightest in appearance is to darken everything else in the painting, and so achieve the greatest contrast.

Colorix
08-13-2012, 04:57 PM
A good while back, someone painted a forest fire, and the firemen fighting it. Possibly a helicopter? Posted in Studio/Gallery.

DAK723
08-13-2012, 05:05 PM
Although painters often ask for help in painting specific subjects, the answer is almost always the same. Don't think about the specific subject, rather, just paint the shapes and colors that you see. I would definitely start with a photo in this case. Try to recreate the colors and shapes (and the correct values, too, obviously) that exist in the photo. Simplify to try and capture the essence of the shape and don't fret over too many details. Again, this is true for every subject, in my opinion.

Sorry that this answer seems to be of no help!

Don

Deborah Secor
08-13-2012, 07:01 PM
Here are a couple to look at that might inspire you:

Forest Fire (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=464691&highlight=firefighter) (This is most likely what Charlie was referring to.)

Fire Storm - Arnold Lowrey (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=215258)

And here's one of mine, though at night.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Aug-2012/23609-SD_Fires.jpg

jackiesimmonds
08-14-2012, 04:08 AM
here is a very helpful tutorial. I believe if you understand the theory well,it goes a LONG LONG way towards getting the look right.

http://hot-lead.org/advance/fire.htm

mr sad
08-14-2012, 07:09 PM
Thank you all so much for this wonderful advice! This Painting Fire article should keep me entertained during my long shift here at the desk this evening.

Theodorablau
09-04-2012, 02:29 PM
Paul, check out this artist's paintings - I've seen a few of them at an exhibition in France and his way of painting fire is awesome!
http://www.artdupastelenfrance.fr/invites.php?invite=CPR10122
Unfortunately, these paintings don't appear on his website:
http://nuckcheddyart.com/english%20site/bienvenue.html

Studio-1-F
09-05-2012, 10:16 AM
Paul, check out this artist's paintings - I've seen a few of them at an exhibition in France and his way of painting fire is awesome!
http://www.artdupastelenfrance.fr/invites.php?invite=CPR10122

Whoa! Awesome ideed! Thanks for posting!

Jan

Sonni
09-08-2012, 08:45 PM
It is difficult to depict fire painting from a photo. What you need to remember is that a fire is a constantly moving object. Stuff that moves will need softened edges or blurred form in some respect. Some edges may be totally lost in smoke. If you can do it, without burning down your environment, set some paper on fire in a large ashtray and observe.

Below was shot at night from a local fire a few years back. One use of fire is to outline what's in front of it

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Sep-2012/111873-Darby_fire_crop_orig.jpg

another. Unless you are close to the fire or the fire is extremely hot and large, often you do not see the apex--that hot spot at the bottom.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Sep-2012/111873-hot_topics_firedanger.jpg