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degreene72
01-09-2001, 04:02 PM
what is the best photo editor going? i've tried pictureit, ultimate fx, mgi photosuite,and photobrush. they all have their good and bad points, but has anyone put together an image editor, compression tool that they really like, and does it all?

bruin70
01-09-2001, 05:13 PM
i use paint shop pro. it's cheap and does everything i need done.

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"it's alright to be judgmental,,,,,,,,if you have taste"...MILT

degreene72
01-09-2001, 05:42 PM
do you think it's possible to take your own digital photos of oil paintings? how do you keep from getting glare, if you do. i end up with bad lighting or glare.

llis
01-09-2001, 06:24 PM
I have had good luck taking my paintings outside in the morning sun. Be sure to take the flash off your camera. If this still does not work for you, try taking the shot in the morning sun but under shade. I have one particular spot on the north side of my house that I use and I am almost always successful.

Also, I have taken successful snaps of my oil paintings in my studio. I have overhead lighting that uses color corrected bulbs. I also have two floor lamps that I use. Using all three light sources seems to help me get good snaps without glare. I don't use the flash with this set up either.

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bruin70
01-09-2001, 06:35 PM
it can be done though i've never done it. my galleries do it all the time. a pro photographer i know said he'd set me up. so i'll drop a line when he does....{M}

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"it's alright to be judgmental,,,,,,,,if you have taste"...MILT

Kevin M
01-09-2001, 07:31 PM
The pricey option is Photoshop which leaves nothing to be desired with regards photo editing. If you require photo compression for the web the best tool available is WebGraphics Optimizer Pro 4.2 which is not expensive but astoundingly efficient.

sandge
01-09-2001, 11:17 PM
Originally posted by degreene72:
what is the best photo editor going?

The best photo editor is photoshop but as Kevin has said, it is pricey. However, in this case you most definately do get what you pay for.
Photoshop now comes bundled with ImageReady which is excellent for preparing images etc for the web.
Has anyone tried Photoshop 6 yet?
s



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http://www.fletcherfineart.com

digistyle
01-11-2001, 01:02 AM
Photoshop. The flexibility is amazing. It probably contains at least three different ways to do any imaging task. It allows you to work the way <u>you</u> like to work instead forcing you to conform to the program. I have 5.5 with no plans to upgrade to 6.0 because I am still finding new ways to work in 5.5.

Just my 2 cents,
Digistyle

arlene
01-11-2001, 01:18 AM
I had photoshop and got rid of it...too complicated, and I don't have enough time to do what I need to.

I got Paintshop Pro and have been very happy with it. Does what I need it to do, and I was able to learn the basics of it in a few hours.

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http://www.artdebut.com/arlene.htm

henrik
01-12-2001, 01:16 PM
I have both Photoshop and PaintShopPro - I almost never use Photoshop.

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Roan
01-12-2001, 07:25 PM
I have PhotoShop, PaintShop Pro and Corel PhotoPaint and Corel Draw!. I use PhotoShop almost exclusively.

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ldallen
01-19-2001, 07:42 AM
Originally posted by degreene72:
do you think it's possible to take your own digital photos of oil paintings? how do you keep from getting glare, if you do. i end up with bad lighting or glare.

I don't know if it's different, but I take mine outdoors with an SLR and I get great shots, even in direct sunlight. I take them from two or three angles, but only move the camera a tiny bit so as not to distort the painting.

pixelscapes
01-19-2001, 03:22 PM
Originally posted by degreene72:
do you think it's possible to take your own digital photos of oil paintings? how do you keep from getting glare, if you do. i end up with bad lighting or glare.

The glare you end up with in your digital photos has very little (quite possibly nothing?) to do with the fact that the camera is digital -- it's a function of the lighting. If you're using a camera with a flash on it, you will almost certainly get a glare from the flash.

If instead you set up lights on either side of the painting at a 45 degree angle on either side, don't use the integral flash, and then take your photo, you won't get the same glare. It can really help to take photos outside also, of course.

-=- Jen "Flasher" de la Cruz
http://www.Pixelscapes.com and http://www.BewareOfArt.com

Asiedydd
01-29-2001, 07:24 PM
I agree with Jen, lighting is important. The best is diffused natural light. Outdoors on a completely overcast day, but not in shade is best for reproducing photos, paintings etc. I am a better photographer than a painter!

TPS
01-29-2001, 10:56 PM
I use Paint Shop Pro for photo editing. It does everything needed, and is close to Photoshop in features. But, I paid $80 for it and Photoshop runs around $600. Pro's need it because it is the industry standard. But you can get by with a simpler program. I agree that Picture Publisher which came with my scanner is a good option.

I don't yet have a digital camera. I take all photos and slides of my paintings outdoors on a bright day and on the north side of the building. I use an 81A filter to cut down the blue element, and use a gray card for exposure. So far they look better than the ones I paid a pro to do.

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http://www.artbydj.com

Kevin M
01-30-2001, 04:26 PM
I have always used a Kodak grey card for calculating exposure it is one of the oldest and most reliable methods. I also use it for calculating digital exposures even though one can more easily recover a poor exposure digitally. A properly exposed digital image is far superior in every respect to a poor one that has been digitally tweaked back to life.

I am surprised at some of the comments about Photoshop. Apart from its outrageous price tag to the home user, I find it does everything that I would ever want with the greatest of ease. First time users would naturally find it intimidating. But even professionals only use a few of the functions on a daily basis. However Photoshop tries (and succeeds very well) to be all things to all people in the graphics business.

sandge
01-30-2001, 09:15 PM
Originally posted by Kevin M:
I have always used a Kodak grey card for calculating exposure it is one of the oldest and most reliable methods. I also use it for calculating digital exposures even though one can more easily recover a poor exposure digitally.


Hi Kevin M!
I have not heard of this. What is a Kodak grey card and how do you use it?
thanks http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif
sandra



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http://www.fletcherfineart.com

TPS
01-30-2001, 10:04 PM
Sandra: You can pick up a gray card (usually 18%) at most decent camera/photo shops. The one I have has instructions printed on the back side. In a normal scene, a light meter in your camera or hand held will give a general reading of your subject. However, if the painting you're photographing is primarily dark, it will compensate for this as if you don't have enough light. Or, if it is high keyed and light, it will expose as if you had too much light. By setting your exposure to the gray card, your dark or light painting will be exposed properly and it will appear the correct darkness or lightness in the print or slide. Another reason to use the gray card, is the exposure will give a better range of values from light to halftones to dark. Photographs often will have exagerated highlights and shadows, or washed out halftones. The gray card helps to minimize such deviations.

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http://www.artbydj.com

Kevin M
01-31-2001, 12:50 AM
Sandra,

TPS just about covered it. You seldom see them around even though they seem to have been on the market as long as the camera itself. They are particularly useful for working with transparency film which has much less exposure latitude than colour or black and white negative.
In photographing artwork for reproduction, take a reading from a gray card positioned on the same plane then take three shots -1/2 stop to +1/2 stop and you can be sure that all possibilities have been covered.
This assumes that you have an accurate meter and in this regard a grey card is useful for checking it against a known accurate one and making adjustments if needed.

Kevin

sandge
01-31-2001, 05:28 PM
Thanks TPS and Kevin for the explanations! http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

s

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http://www.fletcherfineart.com