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MikeN
07-22-2003, 01:59 PM
Hello everyone,

recently I posted a drawing and several members asked about my process.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=120794

I am going to attempt to share the nuts and bolts of how I draw using colored pastel. I quickly drew some pears in a sequential series to illustrate my approach which is very analytical. I like to break the process down into more chewable parts or steps. I also find this is easier for beginners since they can tackle the concepts one at a time rather then juggle everything at once.

Keep in mind its only ONE approach and not the ONLY way of drawing. It seems like a good default approach.


Here is the finished sketch of the pairs to start it off.

MikeN
07-22-2003, 02:02 PM
In my first step I draw with a charcoal pencil on grey paper.

I quickly rough in some shapes and the overall feeling of the subject *the pears*

Im not concerned with contours or details, only the GENERAL feeling. I work from General towards the Specific *detail*.

Here is the pic of step one,

MikeN
07-22-2003, 02:06 PM
In step two I introduce contour lines.

I begin to solve structural and proportion problems by using several measuring tools such as Plumb Lines, Level Lines, Comparative Measuring and Angle Dropping. I stay loose and refrain from shading until Im confident my structure is solid.

I will try and elaborate later on what these are specifically for those who may not recognize the terms.

MikeN
07-22-2003, 02:13 PM
Once I am confident with my proportions and shapes I begin to add the most GENERAL values. This for me is usually only two tones. *see the pear on the right* I block all the shadows in with one simple tone. The paper will serve as the lighter tone which will be present in all the direct light areas.

After I feel I have successfully separated the direct light *primary light* from the shadow i begin to include more specific values.
*see the pear on the left for the more specific values*

In the DIRECT LIGHT I look for Highlights and Lights,

In the SHADOW I look for Core Shadows, Reflected Lights and Cast Shadows.

Here is the next illustrated step

Madder
07-22-2003, 02:18 PM
Mike, I loved your work the other day! Terrific. Hopefully one day I can do something similar (here's hoping:) Loved your style.

Your WIP is great, you/re very generous for wanting to share what you know.. Will stay tuned...
Candidate for hall of fame, guys!
Madder

Drumbeat-trish
07-22-2003, 02:23 PM
Watching intently :) :)

MikeN
07-22-2003, 02:28 PM
After I feel confident in my values I begin to add general colors. My underdrawing can help me to visualize as well as solve some of the value issues with the colored pastels. I solve big patches and shapes first such as the light side of one pear or possibly the shadow side. I make sure to include the general colors of neighboring objects / backgrounds. As I fill in these big areas I start to compare them to each other. How are they different?

How are they different in HUE? Is one orange while the other is yellow?

How are they different in VALUE? Since I have already solved some of the value problems I tend to use my underdrawing as a template. I put a color down and make sure the value matches the value of the underdrawing. If they dont match my color pastel may be the wrong value.

How are they different in INTENSITY? This seems to be the most difficult for beginners to grasp. How pure is the color? Is it bright red or grey pink? I try to remember that the world I see is full of mostly GREYS!

Remember colors can only be different in three ways! Hue, value and intensity.

MikeN
07-22-2003, 02:42 PM
towards the end I keep working more specific. I try and look for colors that I have used too often. I look for subtle color changes in these areas. I try to be careful not to modulate colors soo much that they are unrelated to the object.

I double check the underlying form of the subject. Do my values still relate to the forms and plane changes? Is my light source communicating clearly? I blur my vision to see if the direct light and shadows separate in my drawing. For extemely effective ligh source communication I make sure nothing in the shadow(including reflected light) is as light as anything in the Direct lights. Likewise, nothing in my Direct light should be as dark as anything in my SHADOWS!

I begin to pay close attention to EDGES! There is a hierarchy of values, colors and EDGES. Find the most crisp edges and compare others to them.

We see because of contrast (differnces). Select random areas in the still life and ask yourself. How are they different?

After this I usually look very closely in my fridge for a much deserved beer. Then I compare it to other beers. LOL

P.S. I recommend nobody attempt to draw the same two pears five times.

gmc
07-22-2003, 03:30 PM
Mike,

Thank you so very much. This is an outstanding demo. Needless to say the painting is awesome.

Just a couple of questions if you don't mind. The painting is so natural looking, not stiff with a pasted on look. I am thinking that the lost and found edges are a key to this natural looking appearance. In my attempts I don't seem to find enough soft edges I'm guessing at this moment. Am I correct in thinking that the hard-crisp edges/soft-blended -into -the -background -edges are responsible for this.

The shaded in step--- are you doing this with charcoal? And if so,are you incorporating the charcoal in with the color or are you wiping the charcoal off. If you are using pastel, was that a black pastel? But I am assuming one could use a grey or whatever or do you find charcoal works best?

And you did this with your rembrandts and some ludwigs?

I especially enjoyed the last step. I think I will make that part of my painting routine. That part went really well...hic....

Thanks Mike I just learned a great deal. Now to go put it into practice.

geri

gmc
07-22-2003, 03:34 PM
sorry, but I am still here looking.


I'm just thinking that Maybe I just don't know the correct way to soften an edge?

geri

MikeN
07-22-2003, 03:58 PM
Hi GMC,

great questions,

First YES! you are correct in regards to lost and found edges. Lost edges help place objects into their enviornments. to many sharp and it sits on top, too many soft and everything is way back.

Here is another good tip in regards to edges whether sharp or lost.

when a shadow meets a shadow usually it is a lost or very soft edge *such as the underneath of the pear meeting the cast shadow on the table. Also note the left side of the pears meeting the dark background.* Sharp edges are usually found where a direct light area meets a shadow such as the left sides of the pears meeting the light table cloth. The combo of sharp and soft in these places can really help the object to sit in an enviornment. But trust your eyes a bit they will help you see the lost and founds. Blurr your vision to help. (maybe someone with photoshop can help illustrate this on one of the drawings)

I shade the underdrawing with charcoal pencil. I only add enough to for me to visualize the forms. Too much black charcoal may muddy up colors. I use darker pastels to add on top of the underdrawing in the shadows.

Mike

MikeN
07-22-2003, 04:33 PM
I would like to add one more thing that I left out.

I tend to push the shadows in with my fingers. The direct lights I build up so they are more opaque and THICK! This is similiar to painting with oils. The extra contrast can help with the illusion of light.

Mike

Dyin
07-22-2003, 04:34 PM
Awesome demo! I'm seeing the step I left out that would've helped me with my WIP...I stuggle with getting the right value...I eventually get there, but the step I didn't do would've helped save lots of time. Got my line drawing and then went immediately into applying color with no value sketch...I will do that next time. Also ran over to my WIP to see about hard and soft edges...somehow I've managed to do that but it helps knowing that when shadow meets shadow it softens...etc.

you forgot to tell us the meanings of the terminology...I figure I use all but angle dropping, I don't know what that is but have an idea it might be helpful...

Thanks for taking the time to do this....you know exactly what you are doing in each step...I fuddle around and will get there only after a lot of trial and error so I very much like your way better!!!!!

Hope everyone puts a rating on this...it's a keeper!!!!

MikeN
07-22-2003, 04:49 PM
Hi Dyin,


Im working on putting something together regarding Plumb, Level, Angles , and Compartative Measuring for WC.

Angle Dropping is much easier to show in real time. Its very difficult to explain with only single shots and text. When I teach this tool I have the advantage of watching the student's mechanics carefully to make sure it is done correctly.

Basically its a way of finding the anlge of a line such as those created on rectilinear objects. *although not only rectilinear objects* Here is an alternate approach. Try holding a protractor in front of your face. Look through the protractor at the angle you want to capture (in the subject) and take note of its degrees relationship on the protractor. Now compare it to your drawing. Are they the same?

Other people like to assign the angle a time on the clock. For instance the anlge Im trying to capture in my subject looks like a clock hand on the 45 marker.

Give me a couple days to work it out and I post again.

Mike

MikeN
07-22-2003, 04:53 PM
Hello again Dyin,

about value: VALUE EQUALS VOLUME!

Of the three properties of color, VALUE is the most descriptive of FORM *three demensionality*. In other words, make sure your values are in order! They are what make your work look three demensional. Value is cappable of supporting a drawing all by itself even if the other two properties are flawed.

For those who may have missed it.

Three properties of color = ways of changing a color

1) Hue (the color's identity on the color wheel such as Blue, Yellow, Red, Orange etc.)

2) Value (the color's lightness or darkeness / location on a value scale)

3) Intensity (the color's purity or saturation. Pink is less intense then red even though they are the same Hue)

Madder
07-22-2003, 05:02 PM
Sorry I butted in and stopped the flow everyone. Didn't realize you were in the middle of posting more in the thread, thought the new instalments would come some other time. mea culpa.

I read your story closely and learned a lot. Liked what you said about judging intensity, that's a problem I feel I have..
I have some further questions..

COuld you please explain ALL the measuring terms? I'm not familiar with the terminology, measure just by holding a pencil in front of my eye kind of thing.

With regard to the shadows, am I correct in thinking A is core shadow, b is reflected light and c is cast shadow?

And finally when you say
"I try and look for colors that I have used too often. I look for subtle color changes in these areas. I try to be careful not to modulate colors soo much that they are unrelated to the object. "
I'm not sure I follow, used too often in the painting? How do you know you've used them too often? What do you mean wiht modulation..
Thanks!
Madder

MikeN
07-22-2003, 05:19 PM
Madder THANK YOU FOR THE DIAGRAM!

its perfect. I havent had time to make one myself. Your diagram is completely accurate.

What I was trying to say about using the same color too often is this. People are not the same tan color (lightened or darkend) from head to toe. the color of your foot may be different then the color of you forehead. People often miss these differences and their work may end up with a plastic doll look.

the image below is an example of what Im talking about. Note the highlights on her left and right cheek. If I didnt look carefully I may make them exactly the same. After looking more closely I discovered they are really TWO different HUES! The right side highlight is more yellow orange the left more pink magenta. Further more the yellow one is LIGHTER.

King Terrier
07-22-2003, 05:22 PM
Fantastic tutorial, Mike. Thank you.

Mo.
07-22-2003, 05:24 PM
Hi Mike... many thanks for taking the time to put this invaluable demo together.....this is going to be so useful for lots of folks .... from what you say above I take it you are working on an article for WC.?...... If not then I hope you are at least considering doing so.... we have lots of newcomers joining all the time.... some who have never had an art lesson in their lives..... these sort of articles are always treasure to those wishing to learn...... interesting to read about the protractor for measuring angles... wouldn't have thought of that one... I generally hold my pencil to the angle and judge it that way....your way must be much easier and a more accurate way too......Thanks again Mike.........you have your teacher's hat on today. :)..... Long may it stay there too.:)

Cheers,
Mo.

MikeN
07-22-2003, 05:33 PM
Here is the second part of what I was trying to say Madder.

In my experience when people first learn to see the subtle color changes in their subjects they tend to over exagerate on their drawings / paintings. They may end up with colors that are too extreme and dont seem to belong together anymore. For example the arm doesnt relate to the foot. Although arbitrary color use is perfectly acceptable as a design / style device.

Basically both the people who dont see the color differences and the people who exagerate them too much are not reproducing what they see.

I recomend you step back from your drawings from time to time and look. Make sure you can see both your drawing and the subject from a distance and look back and forth between them. Some of the mismatched colors may jump out at you.

Good luck and hope this helps.

Mike

MikeN
07-22-2003, 05:37 PM
Originally posted by Mo.
I generally hold my pencil to the angle and judge it that way....your way must be much easier and a more accurate way too......Thanks again Mike.........you have your teacher's hat on today. :)..... Long may it stay there too.:)

Cheers,
Mo.

Hi Mo,

my pleasure!

Acutally I dont use the protractor myself I just have a number of tricks for people to sort through. I hold my pencil up and line up the angle then drop it down. But its much harder to do right then it sounds in this paragraph.

About the teachers hat. It all balances out, most of the time I have the DUNCE hat on. LOL

Mike

Mo.
07-22-2003, 06:02 PM
Originally posted by MikeN


Hi Mo,

my pleasure!

Acutally I dont use the protractor myself I just have a number of tricks for people to sort through. I hold my pencil up and line up the angle then drop it down. But its much harder to do right then it sounds in this paragraph.

About the teachers hat. It all balances out, most of the time I have the DUNCE hat on. LOL

Mike

Cannot imagine you ever being sent to the naughty corner. :D:D

MikeN
07-22-2003, 06:42 PM
Originally posted by Mo.


Cannot imagine you ever being sent to the naughty corner. :D:D

Where Im from its not the go sit in the naughty corner anymore its the "Go sit next to mike". LOL

marc
07-22-2003, 06:50 PM
Great demo, thanks Mike!

Mo.
07-22-2003, 06:51 PM
Geroff! LOL :D....Yeah.... go sit next to Mike and learn.:)

gmc
07-23-2003, 06:24 AM
Mike,

This whole tutorial is wonderful. Thank you for your time and expertise.

Just another question. Please bear with me as I really admire your style and approach.

Do you apply this method to figure and/or portrait work? And if you do, do you "fix" the charcoal shading before applying the color?

In your figure you seem to be building the lights at the same time you build you darks. Is this to develop a value range? Or are you working dark to middle to light?

Are you doing a finger blending in your work or is what I am seeing pastel-stroke blending?

I know, I am picking your brain here, I appologize......nah, I am just the curious type..........


geri

Smudger
07-23-2003, 06:53 AM
Erm.. not sure how i missed this one... superb demo and great painting...well done:clap: :clap:

soap
07-23-2003, 07:11 AM
All with the rest - super stuff.
thanks for this - very helpful.

Needs to be in our 'hall of fame' no doubt! (moderator??)

harmony
07-23-2003, 08:51 AM
Damn.... wish I'd looked at this sooner. Was planning to take a look after being recommended by Dyin today but I decided to do some more practice first. Turns out this would have been perfect for my quickie attempts at fruit lol Damn my impatience to get hands on experience.

This is really great of you Mike for doing a tutorial. Next time I'll look first... pastel later :)

Now I'm embarrassed to have posted up my own fruit attempts with something this good near by lol Maybe I'll go delete them :P

MikeN
07-23-2003, 11:00 AM
Originally posted by gmc
Mike,

This whole tutorial is wonderful. Thank you for your time and expertise.

Just another question. Please bear with me as I really admire your style and approach.geri
No problem, really.

Originally posted by gmc

Do you apply this method to figure and/or portrait work? And if you do, do you "fix" the charcoal shading before applying the color?
geri

I apply this method to everthing. Portrait, figure, landscape and still life. I also paint using a similiar method. i solve the entire painting in monochromatic sense first. I then proceed to add color on top of the dried underpainting. It gives me the chance to solve the drafting and value independent from the Hue and Intensity issues.

I hate fixitive. I dont fix anything. I try not too add too much charcoal. My example in STEP THREE shows the most charcoal I would use. However, Pastel is a very forgiving medium and should cover up charcoal within reason.

Originally posted by gmc
In your figure you seem to be building the lights at the same time you build you darks. Is this to develop a value range? Or are you working dark to middle to light?geri

I work everything together normally, unless im having an obsessive day. I typically look for an area with high contrast and solve the dark and the light next to each other. I will post a couple pics today to illustrate this idea. Yes this is to makes sure my values and colors are in order. Colors / vaules are relative to their surroundings. you cant tell what a color looks like until its nieghbor is next to it.

The underdrawing happens to be dark to middle values with no real lights. Once I start adding color pastel I use the full range in front of me. I will lighten up the highlights and such in the pastel stage.

Originally posted by gmc
Are you doing a finger blending in your work or is what I am seeing pastel-stroke blending?geri

I blend when i see a soft edge in the subject. Im careful not to push to hard. I only want to LIGHTLY DUST the surface with my finger. Most of my pastels are rembrandts and do not have the highest covering power. I will occasionally need to push in (smudge) with my fingers in the early stages to fill in the pores of the paper. I then add more pastel on top. Thick untouched pastel is MORE LUMINOUS then rubbed in pastel so its important to build back ontop.

One really important tip when rubbing or softening with fingers! dont rub areas larger then an inch but preferably smaller. You dont want to contaminate nieghboring colors with the color on your finger! Rub a little area clean your finger rub another little area. I assign each finger on my hand a value LOL. My pinky is the lightest my index finger the darkest.

Its imporatant to note that nice transistions come from correct value changes not rubbing or softening with your digits. USE YOUR EYE NOT YOR FINGERS FOR 99% of the drawing!


Originally posted by gmc
I know, I am picking your brain here, I appologize......nah, I am just the curious type..........

No need to appologize it really is my pleasure. Im glad your curious its a wonderful personality trait.
geri

MikeN
07-23-2003, 12:06 PM
Originally posted by gmc
Mike,

In your figure you seem to be building the lights at the same time you build you darks. Is this to develop a value range? Or are you working dark to middle to light?

geri

here is the pic I promised of a high contast area. I generally always start in an area where a light meets a dark. These I refer to as high contrast areas.

In the example below, the first place I added color was to the direct light and shadow of his left chest *our right side* I did my best to match the colors by comparing them to each other. As the drawing progressed and nieghboring colors were plugged in I made minor adjustments.

Here is the example using the figure detail from the other thread

gmc
07-23-2003, 03:35 PM
Mike your a doll.

So basically you are establishing your value "range" from the very beginning determining warm and cool and choosing color as close to a color/figure match right away. Correct me if I am wrong...this seems it would make things easier to determine the middle values (values fitting between darkest and lightest areas found on the model) which in my thinking could also make it easier to determine warm, cool or ochre colors when comparisons are made? Of course understanding that adjustments, even to the darkest darks and lightest lights might need to be made.

I'm seeing on his leg (oh, in the other post) a cool shadow dark contrasting with the lighter top of the leg and being adjust warm and/or cool depending on what the eye is seeing.

Believe it or not the light is lighting in his head, it's still flickering, but it's getting there.

I can't believe all the time, effort and experience you have shared here. A simple "thank you" seems so inadequate. But, you do have my thanks.


geri

MikeN
07-23-2003, 03:51 PM
Im glad I could help. Dont hesitate in the future to ask. It is summer and i have some extra * a lot* free time. I will try and post some more on structure and value etc.

mike

E-J
07-23-2003, 05:58 PM
This is an excellent tutorial, Mike. Your work has such a beautiful luminous quality ... I will be trying your approach!

Gayze
07-23-2003, 06:12 PM
Wow Mike,

Thank you so much for this thread! It's going to be incredibly helpful to a lot of people, me included!

--Gayze

Mo.
07-23-2003, 07:52 PM
Mike... you didn't answer my question... are you turning this into an article for WC!... need to know, because if not .. then I think you definitely should , it's far too valuable to be lost.

jackiesimmonds
07-24-2003, 09:54 AM
from one teacher to another - this is good teaching, Mike.

Jackie

MikeN
07-24-2003, 10:22 AM
thanks everyone,

Thank you Jackie for the nice complement and for the Danniel Greene link.

Mo,

How would I go about making this an article?

Mike

Redsy333
07-24-2003, 11:23 AM
Mike,
Excellent lesson!
Glad I came in to find it;)
One never stops learning and loved this!!!

Mike said:
I hate fixitive. I dont fix anything. I try not too add too much charcoal. My example in STEP THREE shows the most charcoal I would use. However, Pastel is a very forgiving medium and should cover up charcoal within reason.


~My thoughts exactly! Although I have started working my base sketches with Conte' sticks too! I find it easier to work over if I utilize it while blocking in my values!:D

I hope you figure out the article end and carry on with more tips and treats!

angeline
07-24-2003, 11:51 AM
Haven't had time to comment before with working.........this is great stuff.....thanks.

bnoonan
07-24-2003, 11:56 AM
Mike,
I'm thrilled this got STARS and accolades - it's a fabulous tutorial for all of us. Thanks for taking the time to patiently document the process and include us.

I tried to "print" out a printable version and found I'll lose the images so I'll have to keep this in my "favorites" and/or refer back to it now and then.

Beautiful - and thanks again.

Barb

meowmeow
07-24-2003, 12:22 PM
Haven't been around much lately so almost missed this...would have been a shame! This is wonderful! Thank you so much for taking the time to do it!

Sandy

MikeN
07-24-2003, 12:28 PM
Thanks for the thanks LOL.


I didnt actually document the work as I went along. Each step really is a different drawing. LOL. THey are hanging next to each other in my office in the proper sequence.

Bnoonan,

I have some black and white zerox copies of the origninal in the original size if your interested. You can hang them next to each other. Of course I will not be able to send out some to everyone.

mike

marc
07-24-2003, 01:22 PM
Barb -

If you want to print out the tutorial with pictures here's one way to do it (assuming you use Windows):

1) Scroll to the beginning of the tutorial, press the 'print screen' button (it's at the top row between the numpad section and the letter section on the keyboard).

2) Open MSPaint, it comes as part of Windows (I think it's in the Programs/Acessories folder). In Paint, select menu Edit->paste and it should ask you to enlarge the bitmap, say yes. Now you can crop and print out this bit, then scroll down in your browser for the next section of the tutorial, press 'print screen' again and paste the new bit into Paint (or any other graphics program) ad lib :)

Dyin
07-24-2003, 02:03 PM
Barb...it works! But first it pasted my mail program lol...so had to close that and you have to have the page full size or it'll print your desktop too LOL...just make sure the image you want is on your monitor....thanks Mike...learn something new each day!!!

Mo.
07-24-2003, 03:48 PM
This is going so well Mike, Hang in there, should have something for you soon..:)

Mo.

Dyin
07-24-2003, 04:14 PM
Just wanted to say that I changed how I'm doing the other pant leg on my WIP...I'm doing a lot of layers so I would just put down the first layer of the very darkest blue and lightest light..white...and then I'd try to get the overall color close to the end results so that it was really just still lightest and darkest value but the right shade for the base color, and then go back in and adjust middletones to a final finish. so it was very slow and kind of backwards even tho I would end up with the right result in the end...VERY slowly...so today I tried it this way...I still put my very dark and very light but adjusted everything to the right value, if not the exact shade yet, and included mid-tones this time...if I squint my eyes a lot then it looks like the other leg, albeit a bit rough...now I think I should be able to fine tune much easier and I did all that in a 1/2 hour, whereas maybe getting to a close approximation of all the values before would take me hours...it's the only way I knew to approach it...so a sincere thank you for showing me an easier, quicker way...I know it'll still be slow on the tweaks...but still, it's a lot nicer this way! Thanks!

gmc
07-24-2003, 05:10 PM
Good for you Mike,

So well deserved for so much help!!!!

geri

Kathryn Wilson
07-25-2003, 06:30 PM
Going to bump this up to the top so we don't lose it.

Invaluable advice and demonstration!

butterfly
07-26-2003, 02:11 AM
Thank you .... printed this off for my folder ....

Butterfly/Roni

Craig Houghton
07-26-2003, 10:37 PM
I was hoping that I'd return from vacation and find some really wonderful posts waiting to be read -- but this is far beyond my expectations. Amazing stuff! Thank you!

Artwise, I spent a lot of my vacation time learning about chroma and so on, so it's a blast seeing how you handle/discuss intensity. Many thanks!

-Craig

Craig Houghton
07-26-2003, 10:37 PM
I was hoping that I'd return from vacation and find some really wonderful posts waiting to be read -- but this is far beyond my expectations. Amazing stuff! Thank you!

Artwise, I spent a lot of my vacation time learning about chroma and so on, so it's a blast seeing how you handle/discuss intensity. Many thanks!

-Craig

crumbedbrains
07-27-2003, 10:28 AM
Haven't been around much lately but lucky I came back to see this!!
Great stuff Mike!!!

This should (and deserves to) end up as an article!!
Thanks
Crumby :)

MarshaSavage
07-30-2003, 07:53 AM
Mike,
Just wanted to say "Great Demo" and wonderful discussions as to the whys and hows!

You have a wonderful knack for putting into words those thoughts on why you are doing whatever it takes to get the modulations of value and color, edges, etc.

Glad it was rated -- this should be a must-read for beginners to pastel (or any medium) -- and hopefully an article will be forthcoming?

Thanks for taking the time!

Dark_Shades
07-30-2003, 08:05 AM
Great work and demo Mike.......... you are always a GREAT teacher....... you put things in such away that they are easily understood....... and take the time to clarify things and open to questions and thoughts

.... well done to you

.... theres quite a crowd gathering in that corner trying to sit with you lolol

MikeN
08-07-2003, 02:03 AM
Hello everyone,

Just wanted to give you an update on the article. I am still gathering images and such. Hopefully it will be next week. I will try and write an aritcle for several of the topics in this thread such as Sighting, Value and Color.

Mike

gmc
09-26-2003, 05:02 PM
bringing this to the top for the Library

geri

Mo.
09-26-2003, 05:09 PM
Thanks Geri... I also gave the link to llis to be added, I tried my best to get Mike turn this into an article, but guess the guy is way too busy, it's a must for the library as far as I'm concerned

Mo.:)

MikeN
10-05-2003, 08:12 PM
Hello everyone,

Sorry for the delay! I have become soo busy that my article has taken a back seat. I dont know when I will be able to resume but I promise it will happen.

I hopping christmas vacation! I have do have something in the works.

mike

Mo.
10-06-2003, 07:04 AM
Hi Mike... I sort of guessed that was the case.:)

We'll all wait for you don't worry.

Mo.:)

Bubba's Mama
10-11-2003, 12:47 PM
Mike, I am brand new to pastels - usually hang out in watercolor and acrylics -

so, I had lots and lots of questions, and, being the good doobie that I am :D , I decided to read through the library before becoming a pain with questions that are really dumb!!

And, WOW - this WIP/tutorial answered whole bunches of those questions. Your teaching skills are amazing... everything was clearly explained, in the right places, and at a level that someone as new to this as I am could understand it all.

Many, many thanks. I agree with the others - words simply cannot express my gratitued.

Susan

MikeN
01-29-2004, 04:21 PM
thanks everyone,

If any of the WC drawing members are in or near the St. Louis area, I will be giving a workshop on the four measuring devices and more sometime this Spring 2004. The rate should be very reasonable. Im guessing approximately $50 for two days. Email me with any questions at [email protected] I will be happy to answer and answer questions regarding my background.

It will be an old school appoach with newsprint and conte or pencils. If structure is your down fall you may consider it.

BTW, sorry i havent been visiting lately but I have been searching for a job and getting ready for some exhibitions.

Miken

crazyartist2000
05-03-2004, 11:06 PM
:clap: great tutorial Mike!! I have only made it to the end of page two so will be saving the thread to my desktop to continue next time I have a minute to continue reading.
Crystal :D