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egevil
07-15-2003, 12:39 AM
Hello everybody,
I am new to this channel, the printmaking, and I would like to ask a question, i have just bought a Holbein etching press, and i would like some advice on how to set up my studio/atelier in the best possible way. I have a room of my ow measuring of 2 by 6 meters, with a glass roof, and a large window to one side.
The press allows me to make prints upto A5 format, and I suppose it will need a concrete base where i must put it on.
I have made already linocuts, etchings in copper, zinc, and plexi, but this is my very first studio, I also do watercolours, and acrylics, so I want to set up things correctly so that I can make the most of the space available to me.
Another questions is; Is any of you into mezzotint? I have tried one or two but I would like to learn more about this technique.
Thanks for listening to me,
greetings,
Liesbeth

timelady
07-15-2003, 06:11 AM
Wow, congrats on the press! You can have a press-warming party. :)

I personally would put the press in front of the window, where light can fall on it so you can see best when you're setting up for press. Maybe a table also across the front of the window for inking up, etc. But of course you need to make sure there's room for the press to move across. ;) (I would forget something simple like that!) If your table is slightly lower than the press bed then you could let it overlap a bit.

You may not need a concrete base - I'm not sure how big the press is. Sounds very small - A5? That's about half a letter page? Anyway... I used to have a etching press that did up to A3, it was VERY heavy (couldn't move it on my own) but it was fine on a strong sturdy little table. Oh, I miss that press...:(

Never tried mezzotint but think it's cool. All I know is you use some special little wheel to etch the whole plate. Then you use a burnisher to flatten the areas you want white. It's like etching in reverse.

Tina.

egevil
07-15-2003, 07:23 PM
Thanks Tina for your advice, I must have the papersize wrong, I thing it must be A3 instead of A5, it is double of A4, and the press weighs about 80 kilo's I cannot lift it on my own, but even then I think a sturdy table will be enough, what i was worried about is the floor of the studio, it is under construction in our garden, it is build in wood and on a concrete floor so a good table on top of that will be ok.
I live in Belgium and the weather is often so that I will not be able to work with the door and/or window open. I will have to install a ventilation system for the acids etc. anyone any ideas about that?
I have searched the internet but cannot find any practical info.
Thanks,
Liesbeth

sassybird
07-15-2003, 10:58 PM
Mine is on a Black and Decker work bench. The width can be adjusted to fit whatever is on it. I am sure that you must have something like that over there.

Here is a pic of my set up. I didn't have much choice of where to put the press because my drafting table weighs nearly as much as the press does......lol My drafting table is next to the window, and my press is right below the ceiling light. To the right I have a work bench to ink my plates, and a stack of dry wall sheets to put my etchings between for drying and keeping the prints flat. I use an old light box to mix and roll my inks out on.

My studio is very small, and I have covered the floor with masonite and cheap throw rugs to protect the carpeting. I hope this gives you some ideas.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Jul-2003/1355-PressSetUp3.jpg

egevil
07-15-2003, 11:07 PM
Thanks Charissa, that is your name is it? The idea to use a Black & Decker workbench is very good, very practical too, I wish my studio was already so far ready, that I could start to use it, but I will have to be patient, my husband is building it between his long working hours, and there is only so much i can do myself.
I also was thinking about placing the press in the middle of the room, as I will have a glass roof, that would be perfect, and i like to be able to walk around the press, to look at things from all angles.
There is so much that i want to fit into the studio that it will be as full as yours is, I fear.
I haven't bought a drawing table yet, I was thinking about one that can be tilted to the angle that is needed for this or that work. I also do a lot of painting, so my easel and painting stuff will be in there too.
But planning and thinking about what i want gives me pleasure too...........
Liesbeth

Greg C.
07-15-2003, 11:18 PM
I do not really have anything constructive to add to this discussion...I just wanted to say that I am very, very jealous!! :D

egevil
07-15-2003, 11:24 PM
Greg, don't be jealous, you know i have waited for over 30 years before I could realise this dream of my very own studio.
And that i now own a press, is only because my husband and i stay in South Korea for 3 months now and prices here are unbelievably cheap, I have bought loads of paper, paint, etching materials, and of course the press, for a fraction of what they would cost at home.
Next weekend are going back home to belgium, and the real construction of my lifetime dream will become reality.
So don't give up hope you never know when it will be your turn............
Liesbeth

sassybird
07-17-2003, 03:34 PM
Liesbeth, I waited that long for my press too:) My husband bought it for me on our 2 anniversary. Mine is a Griffin press, 12x24" which is just perfect for the sizes I work in. Those presses are sure spendy though, even used ones. We had a few presses in school that were nearly 80 years old and worked like a charm. Take good care of that new baby! I'm happy for you:D

stephaniedean
02-09-2004, 03:03 PM
This is my first post to this website, and i am not sure i am in the right place, so let me know if i should be elsewhere. I have a Meeker-McFee press that i am required to find a buyer for. I am wondering if printmakers such as yourselves are aware of or familiar with this press, and know what its reputation is in the printmaking world. This press was designed in the early 60's, and as far as i can tell from the Sussex Machine Corp literature, only 150 were made. I believe production stopped sometimes in the late 60's. Looking around at press sites, such as Dick Blick's and Conrad Machine Inc, it appears that most etching presses are smaller and less expensive than this one, so that is a starter. But i wonder how it matches up in terms of its function. Has anyone heard of this press, does anyone know of one in use, or is anyone familiar with its performance? stephanie

Diane Cutter
02-09-2004, 06:20 PM
Next weekend are going back home to belgium, and the real construction of my lifetime dream will become reality............
Liesbeth

It sounds wonderful. Be sure to have lots and lots of shelves made. I found that I always seemed to have a lot of clutter until I finally filled one wall with 18" deep shelves. It holds books, inks, watercolors, oils, stretcher strips, knves, etc. and all my plastic boxes are labeled so I know what's in each.

When I say shelves, I mean all the way up to the ceiling. I can see everything and put the stuff I don't use that often up on the top where I need a step stool to get things down. Another wall has wider shelves for my papers and prints.

How nice to plan everything from a fresh start... Congratulations... and welcome to the forum.

Diane

printzessofthenorth
02-11-2004, 11:42 AM
This is my first post to this website, and i am not sure i am in the right place, so let me know if i should be elsewhere. I have a Meeker-McFee press that i am required to find a buyer for. I am wondering if printmakers such as yourselves are aware of or familiar with this press, and know what its reputation is in the printmaking world. This press was designed in the early 60's, and as far as i can tell from the Sussex Machine Corp literature, only 150 were made. I believe production stopped sometimes in the late 60's. Looking around at press sites, such as Dick Blick's and Conrad Machine Inc, it appears that most etching presses are smaller and less expensive than this one, so that is a starter. But i wonder how it matches up in terms of its function. Has anyone heard of this press, does anyone know of one in use, or is anyone familiar with its performance? stephanie

Hi, nice to meet you. I'm not sure if I have the authority to say whether this is the correct forum for your post or not...the moderator can say, but if you are trying to sell your press you might have more luck in the swap forum. Wishing you luck,

debbie

printzessofthenorth
02-11-2004, 11:50 AM
Hello everybody,
I am new to this channel, the printmaking, and I would like to ask a question, i have just bought a Holbein etching press, and i would like some advice on how to set up my studio/atelier in the best possible way. I have a room of my ow measuring of 2 by 6 meters, with a glass roof, and a large window to one side.
The press allows me to make prints upto A5 format, and I suppose it will need a concrete base where i must put it on.
I have made already linocuts, etchings in copper, zinc, and plexi, but this is my very first studio, I also do watercolours, and acrylics, so I want to set up things correctly so that I can make the most of the space available to me.
Another questions is; Is any of you into mezzotint? I have tried one or two but I would like to learn more about this technique.
Thanks for listening to me,
greetings,
Liesbeth

Hi just wanted to say, welcome and congratulations on your new studio! Not sure of the dimensions (A5) that you use...must be a European measurement... I have a Dick Blick 999 press. The bed measures 18" x 36" and I have it resting on a sturdy table. Don't know if mine is comparable in weight or size to yours...sorry don't understand the European weight system either :crying: wish I did...just never could wrap my mind around it.

The only thing I know about mezzotint, is that you can buy plates already prepared and save yourself that step, if you want. But I guess lots of folks like doing it all and saving $$ on the less expensive unprepared plates. :D

I would like to know a little bit more about this technique as well. Good question.

Blessings on your new studio,

debbie

stephaniedean
02-12-2004, 10:15 PM
Hi, nice to meet you. I'm not sure if I have the authority to say whether this is the correct forum for your post or not...the moderator can say, but if you are trying to sell your press you might have more luck in the swap forum. Wishing you luck,

debbie

i'm not actively sellingl it yet. i don't know enough about what the reputation of this press is among printmakers to have much to say beyond handing along the literature printed up long ago. i thought someone might actually know how use of it compares to what is mostly out there. i don't know if function is the reason so few were made, expense, weight ?? I know way back when, there were some machine company legal problems, but had it been the best thing since sliced bread, i'm assuming someone would have made it work...it is handsome to look at, but again, if you could choose any press, what would it be, and why might it not be this meeker mcfee one. I don't know what kind of printmaker would want this kind over another, if it is more appropriate to a business, a school?? maybe there aren't even any in use at this point, i just don;t know maybe there are so few out there that the liklihood of finding someone with experience with one is slight...i suppose i could try and find other printmaker chat lists. if anyone has an idea at some point, please let me know, thanks, stephanie

doug_h
02-13-2004, 01:05 AM
maybe there are so few out there that the liklihood of finding someone with experience with one is slight...i suppose i could try and find other printmaker chat lists. if anyone has an idea at some point, please let me know, thanks, stephanie

You might want to try a posting at http://frank.mtsu.edu/~art/printmaking/wwwboard/index.html Someone there might be able to help you

Doug