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kevinl2046
07-15-2003, 01:13 AM
I am having a hard time finding a good list of art schools. I looked at the USNEWS Fine arts rankings but those were for graduate schools. So how about we start a list here? I think it will be best to divide our list into art schools and university art departments.
Try to give a short summary if possible.

I'll start..

Great Undergraduate Art Schools and Departments

Art School:

Pratt
SCAD
Parsons
Art Institute of Chicago

University Departments:

Carnegie Mellon University
http://www-art.cfa.cmu.edu/

Carnegie Mellon School of Fine Arts This school provides tons of vocational training so students are ready for any type of art work once they graduate. There is also top notch engineering and science departments.

Williams College
http://www.williams.edu/art/

Small Liberal Arts college with a very intense curriculum. Top ranked school in the nation with relatively strong art department in liberal arts colleges.

Washington University St. Louis
http://artsci.wustl.edu/~artweb/washUSoa/

5000 or so undergrads, so I would expect the university's art school doesn't have a homogenous student body. A new, gigantic art building is planned to be constructed, but I don't know how long that will take.

Jon Roark
07-15-2003, 12:58 PM
I attended Fashion Institute of Technology (http://www.fitnyc.edu/html/dynamic.html) in Manhattan in the mid 1980's. I found it to be an excellent experience. I'd already graduated from a liberal arts college which was a great experience, but an art degree from that sort of environment was virtually worthless. Liberal arts is a great place to develop the thinking side, but terrible to develop drawing or painting skills. There just isn't enough time to put into drawing classes and the students tended to take on this attitude of, "I've had drawing 101 and 201, so I know how to draw." even if they didn't really know how to draw. I appreciate both experiences greatly. I felt that many of the students in the program at FIT ended up with excellent drawing skills, but really needed to go on to a liberal arts experience because they hadn't developed the intellectual side of things (drawing and painting 8 hours a day doesn't leave much time for reading and studying). The thing I truly respect about FIT is the fact that the instructors were expected to be working in the field, not out getting doctorates in education. We were learning from professionals who knew their way around the industry and that was a wonderful experience. It was not the pedigree driven club that higher education can be at many liberal arts colleges. One of my teachers told me that the students had a portfolio day at the end of each semester and the day after that, the teachers had a portfolio day because they had to show they had been working also. It was a great place for me!

Danny
07-17-2003, 05:22 AM
Is there one (Good Art School) in Texas .

Mandy Valin
07-17-2003, 10:39 AM
I was considering Pratt, but I dont like the idea of going to school in Brooklyn for two years, so I think I'm going for the University of the Arts in Philidelphia, has anyone heard of it?

David81
07-19-2003, 03:15 PM
Hey Alde, University of the Arts has a good reputation and is in a good area of Philadelphia. Did you apply yet and what do you want to major in?

David

Rose Queen
07-19-2003, 03:35 PM
Don't forget Art Center College of Design in Pasadena!

http://www.artcenter.edu/



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Mandy Valin
07-19-2003, 04:48 PM
Haven't applied yet, but they received my SAT scores and they sent me and application and a letter asking to consider their school. I was gonna wait until school starts again to apply.
Im gonna major in Fine Arts, Painting and Drawing.
College is still a huge mystery to me, I really have no idea whats going on :rolleyes:

pyrabug
07-23-2003, 02:31 AM
i'm surprised no one has mentioned RISD (http://www.risd.edu).

i remember in high school while applying to schools my art teacher stressed this school to us along with Pratt and Parsons. they have an extremely competitive program.

pop miasma
07-24-2003, 05:30 AM
hi, some of you may have seen my posts in the intro and colored pencil forums...when i saw this post i thought of the list i've used as a base for my own art school search. i got it from a book containing information on colleges, their rankings, and so forth. it's the only top undergrad art program list i've ever seen. i wouldn't reccommend taking what any single college book says as the end-all truth on the subject, but nevertheless it does provide some aid, since it can help you find new schools to investigate. before i found this list i didn't even know suny - purchase existed, and now i'm considering applying since i've checked out more info on it. anyway, on to the list:
small colleges and universities: alfred university, bard college, brown university, furman university, hollins college, kenyon college, lake forest college, manhattanville college, suny - purchase, randolph-macon women's college, university of north carolina - greensboro, scripps college, skidmore college, smith college.
large colleges and universities: boston university, carnegie mellon university, university of cincinnati, cornell, harvard, university of michigan, new york university, university of pennsylvania, university of rochester, washington university in st. louis, university of washington.
art schools: art center college of design, california institute of the arts, cooper union, maryland institute college of art, massachusetts college of art, moore college of art & design, north carolina school of the arts, otis college of art & design, parsons, pratt, rhode island school of design, school of the art institute of chicago, school of visual arts.

i really hope this helps :)! once again, not the end-all or anything i'm sure; i haven't investigated all of these schools in detail, and other schools i've looked into have some great programs but are not on this list...but i thought it really helped me branch out and find out more about schools i didn't know much about. :cat:

i'm entering my senior year in high school this fall, so this is a subject i've given a lot of thought to...please excuse the massive length of my post. :angel:

artinoils
07-24-2003, 05:03 PM
I am amazed no one has mentioned Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts...in Philadelphia...it's top notch and the best credential you could receive.
PAFA (http://www.pafa.edu)

Mandy Valin
07-24-2003, 06:20 PM
I'm hearing so much about Pratt here! I got info in the mail about them ,and I really dont know what is so great about them
Does anyone know what it is that makes people recommend Pratt?

RoshSok
07-29-2003, 01:05 PM
Alde, Pratt is supposed to be good--but I've heard they have high standards grades-wise and SAT-wise...i think over 1100. I have a good friend from high school who goes there and he loves it.

The other thing is that they're expensive, but so is SVA and the other art schools in the metropolitan area (or anywhere that is).

Hope this helps
Rosh

DanaT
07-29-2003, 01:07 PM
If you just want excellent art instruction and are not concerned about a BFA, the Art Students League of New York, has world famous instructors and a full time schedule of classes in painting and drawing, and other media.

Mandy Valin
07-29-2003, 01:28 PM
Im not worried about getting into a school, grades-wise ( i got around 1300 on SATs ;)), as I am getting in, paying and then hating it there, and I have no way to know really if Im going to like it
Also, Im not really sure what to look for in a good art school.

lavendarMist
07-30-2003, 04:25 PM
Originally posted by Alde
I'm hearing so much about Pratt here! I got info in the mail about them ,and I really dont know what is so great about them
Does anyone know what it is that makes people recommend Pratt?


I am going to be attending pratt this fall, I applied to RISD, SCAD, Ringling School of art and Design, Chicago Institute of Art, and Laguna College of art and design. I was excepted into them all but Pratt really stud out from the rest.

1. Pratt is in Brooklyn Nyc, the cultural center of the USA, probably the world. But the nice thing about it, is that it is a campus. It is not scattered about the area. There are great buildings dorms, and professor housing all gatted in on a great grass mall in the center, with security at all of the entrences. There are sculptures about the lawn that are changed regurlary.

2. The faculty is still involved in their field. They stay in tuch with new devlopments and trends in the majors and their work is recognizable.

3. The students, I felt when I visited the school like they were all dedicated and were all very caring. Visiting RISD i felt that the students were cold, they felt that they were the best and didnt seem to be to friendly. But when I visited pratt I felt like I was right at home. I could talk to any student and they were very nice and polite.

4. Graduates get good jobs. Because the industry knows the level of expertice that Pratt graduates have been raised to. Major companies like Disney, hire pratt graduates.

Hope this helps.
Kat.

Mandy Valin
07-30-2003, 04:39 PM
Wow, thanks Kat!This does help. Im now seriously re-considering!
I only wish there was some way I could check out the campus.

Are you doing the thing where you study for two years at the school in Utica I think it was, and then two years in Brooklyn?

lavendarMist
07-30-2003, 11:30 PM
I am spending 4 years at the Brooklyn campus. But I think that is because I am going into Computer Graphics in Animation.

I live in up state New Hampshire, so I called the Admissions office and they set up an overnight stay so I could visite the campus. They let you stay in a house with about 6 students who answer questions about the school and show you around, and you can also sit in on a class. That is how I was able to visite the campus, and I gave me a real great impression of the place. Alot of campuses if you make arrangements in advanced you can spend a night in the dormitory that way it gives you a good look around and a break from traveling.

Mandy Valin
07-31-2003, 09:14 AM
Wow that is really awesome. Does it cost anything?
Both of their campuses are kinda far, I live in northern new york state, and I really have no way of getting there, but I was thinking of taking a bus to visit some colleges

mame
07-31-2003, 11:29 AM
Check out Cooper Union

http://www.cooper.edu/

Axl
07-31-2003, 12:11 PM
This is such a fantastic thread!

I've been told by people that left other institutions to study here, that nscad (http://www.nscad.ns.ca/) is a very fine institute in Canada.

lavendarMist
07-31-2003, 05:05 PM
Originally posted by Alde
Does it cost anything?
Both of their campuses are kinda far, I live in northern new york state, and I really have no way of getting there, but I was thinking of taking a bus to visit some colleges

Its totally free, when I visited Savannah College of art and design I even got free meal and a t-shirt. Colleges like having the perspective students stay and get a real feal for the college. I visited Cooper Union and on the way back RISD all in one trip. It was a real great experience. I highly recomend visiting the campuses. I was able to take the Amtrak into Penn Station and I got the subway directions from Pratts website www.pratt.edu

Classical Vince
07-31-2003, 10:12 PM
Hey there. I thought I would add a resource for anyone looking for a school that focuses on using traditional training methods.

The Art Renewal Center has an atelier listing. For those who dont know, an Atelier is where you can learn to draw/paint with a master artist, not some teacher who has a degree and no talent. This was the ONLY way artists were trained up until the 20th century - it's a 500 year old tradition that has produced all the Great Masters.

http://www.artrenewal.com/

Don't be a McArtist! Learn from a master.

kevinl2046
08-01-2003, 07:00 PM
Oh, duh...Yale University Art School.

jlawrance123
08-09-2003, 09:45 PM
Cooper Union is pretty good.

arlene
08-10-2003, 03:27 AM
Syracuse University...it's an art school within the university.

arlene
08-10-2003, 03:28 AM
Originally posted by Classical Vince
Hey there. I thought I would add a resource for anyone looking for a school that focuses on using traditional training methods.

The Art Renewal Center has an atelier listing. For those who dont know, an Atelier is where you can learn to draw/paint with a master artist, not some teacher who has a degree and no talent. This was the ONLY way artists were trained up until the 20th century - it's a 500 year old tradition that has produced all the Great Masters.

http://www.artrenewal.com/

Don't be a McArtist! Learn from a master.

and who defines who's a Master Artist? I think the art renewal center is a back patting site for each other...at least that's what I found.

arlene
08-10-2003, 03:30 AM
Originally posted by Alde
Im not worried about getting into a school, grades-wise ( i got around 1300 on SATs ;)), as I am getting in, paying and then hating it there, and I have no way to know really if Im going to like it
Also, Im not really sure what to look for in a good art school.

having good grades is not enough to get into a good art school...You need a top notch portfolio too...as a matter of fact I'd say thats 10x as important as grades and sat scores.

lavendarMist
08-10-2003, 11:52 AM
Originally posted by arlene


having good grades is not enough to get into a good art school...You need a top notch portfolio too...as a matter of fact I'd say thats 10x as important as grades and sat scores.

I tottaly agree... my sat is a whooping 920, and my portfolio is what really pulled my weight in aplying to art schools, cause I am mathmatically challenged... oh and I cant spell if you havent noticed allready.

kierska
08-10-2003, 03:39 PM
just thought I'd tell you all about my alma mater- The College of Visual Arts in St. Paul, Minnesota

www.cva.edu

You might think MN is nothing but lakes and cold, but the twin cities (St. Paul and Minneapolis) are FULL of art culture- and have an excellent music scene. I loved it there. Tons of galleries, museums, cultural events.

Anyway, CVA is a private, accredited 4-year college. There are only 250-300 students enrolled per year, so class sizes are small and you get lots of one-on-one time with instructors. A lot of teachers there are working professionals in their fields. You -seriously- are a face there, not a number. Even the director of student affairs is on a first-name basis with almost all the students (I still keep in touch with her- and she helped me complete my senior thesis...)

But that's just the warm-n-fuzzy of it :) This school is TOUGH. You really earn your degree there- (majors include drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, illustration, and design) I came away with a great education-

ok, I'm rambling- if anyone's interested or has questions, PM me and I'll ramble some more...

Classical Vince
08-10-2003, 11:46 PM
Arlene - I agree, the ARC site is a back patting site. They recognize artists whose work has fallen by the wayside in our fashion-trendy world of art.

Personally, I appreciate the work they do to bring our attention to the growing number of artists working in the classical tradition.

They have a good number of interesting articles that raise thought provoking questions about the current trends in art. In fact, the articles outnumber the artists showcased there. Curious if you have had the opportunity to read some of them.

The museum on the site has over 20,000 [!] images, some of them high resolution that are suitable for printing. They also feature brief biographies on some of the greatest painters of our time. Other articles include technique and classical painting demonstrations. They do lack a forum area though, I think its sorely needed.

As you can see, the site has more value than just a pat on the back. Considering the topic for this thread, the link served its purpose for providing information on ateliers, an alternative to institutionalized art instruction.

The_Dance
04-24-2004, 07:49 AM
I thought I'd help the Brits out with our lists of top art colleges in London.



(Luckily I got a place at this college, I start this September!)http://www.csm.linst.ac.uk/ Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design has a distinguished international reputation and is the largest of the London Institute art colleges. It offers the most diverse and comprehensive range of degree and postgraduate courses in art and design in the country - it is in essence, the complete Art College! Through the work of staff and students, Central Saint Martins continues to build on the success of its past by pushing the boundaries of both the practice of art and design and art and design education.

http://www.camb.linst.ac.uk/ Camberwell College of Arts has been at the forefront of Art education in Britain for almost a hundred years. Today it has a broad and exciting portfolio of courses that builds on this tradition and experience, bringing expertise in the making, studying and conserving of artwork together in one College. Camberwell brings together specialist study in visual arts, design, art history and conservation. Its students are urged to explore the relationships between these specialisms and to question traditional boundaries and ways of thinking, preparing them for life in the professional world.


http://www.chelsea.linst.ac.uk/ Chelsea College of Art and Design's main aim is to continue to provide a specialist education for tomorrow's artists and designers by equipping students with the conceptual and practical skills that will enable them to practice as professional artists and designers into the next millennium. The College's enviable reputation as a centre for excellence is based on the high national and international standing of its courses, the success of staff in their professional fields and the success of students in competitions, prizes, exhibitions and commissions both at home and abroad.


http://www.lcf.linst.ac.uk/cms.cgi/site/ London College of Fashion has an international reputation as a leading provider of fashion education, research and consultancy. The unique portfolio of specialist courses range in level, from Foundation to Postgraduate. The subject range corresponds to the process of the creation, production and promotion of fashion and the management and marketing of those activities. Many of the Collegeís courses are unique to the UK and offer students an experience unmatched by even a handful of specialist colleges worldwide.


http://www.lcp.linst.ac.uk/ London College of Printing celebrated its centenary in 1995. The
College is one of Europe's largest centres for the study of communication, design, media and distribution, and over the years its graduates have included some of the world's leading professionals in these areas. The college offers a wide range of specialist courses in rapidly developing commercial and technological fields: film and TV, digital imaging, advertising, graphic design, retailing and e-commerce, photography, publishing, sound and many related fields. LCP offers students a wide range of educational opportunities which will prepare them to operate as leading professionals in the twenty-first century.

Keith Russell
04-28-2004, 05:22 PM
I don't know if its been mentioned, but the Kansas City Art Institute is usually among the top-ten rated art school in the US. Their ceremics program is usually in the top three, and their fiber arts program is usually one of the top two.

The school is within walking distance of two major museums: the incredibly underrated Nelson-Adkins Museum of Art (currently undergoing a multi-million dollar expansion) and the awesome Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art.

The school's library is also highly recommended; can't wait to spend more time there!

K

sue ellen
04-28-2004, 08:31 PM
A friend showed me the Nelson-Adkins Museum of Art and the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art for the first time about a year ago....awsome museums! I wish i could have spent several days in the Nelson-Adkins and I would go back to the Kemper again and again! :)


Keith - Are you going to be attending the Kansas City Art Institute?

In the fall I will be attending The School of the Art Institute of Chicago as a graduate student in the Master of Arts in Art Education. I will have to check back into this thread and give a review after I have been there a while.

Keith Russell
04-28-2004, 10:49 PM
A friend showed me the Nelson-Adkins Museum of Art and the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art for the first time about a year ago....awsome museums! I wish i could have spent several days in the Nelson-Adkins and I would go back to the Kemper again and again! :)


Keith - Are you going to be attending the Kansas City Art Institute?

Yes. (Did I forget to mention the name of the place? Figures...)

In the fall I will be attending The School of the Art Institute of Chicago as a graduate student in the Master of Arts in Art Education. I will have to check back into this thread and give a review after I have been there a while.

Please do. I am thinking seriously about pursuing a Master's, in three years after I complete my BFA (concentration in painting) from the Kansas City Art Institute, and I think that Chicago will be the first place I check out.

K

edithbear
04-29-2004, 06:58 AM
I went to the Corcoran School of Art bfa program in Washington, D.C.. I graduated in '91. In my experience there the emphasis was strongly on conceptual art and less on technical skills. After I graduated I realized how little I knew about becoming an artist. I think a lot of art schools today do not emphasize the technical aspects of painting and drawing. When you consider which art school you want to go to make sure you ask what the school's emphasis is.

However I would not trade the experience of living in D.C. for anything! I learned so much just by living in such a city that is rich in culture and diversity!
http://corcoran.org/

Fmalo
04-29-2004, 11:21 AM
I know this is a list of Top Art Schools, but; when my daughter was considering college, her Guidance Counselor mentioned Kutztown* in Pennsylvania. Supposedly, at least back then (about 15 years ago), it had a very good Art program & was comparatively inexpensive.

She opted for Mary Washington College in Fredricksburg, VA & majored in Historic Preservation.

*Kutztown was/is? part of the Pennsylvania state college system. Check it out - it may be an alternative to the big bucks schools. It's small & located in a quite rural area.

ripper4
05-01-2004, 09:26 PM
I was going to say EXACTLY what edith said about the Corcoran School of Art.
(BFA 92) They are great at inspiring you to think and not so great at showing you how to create. I feel inspiring you to think is much more important. Skills on "how to physically do something" can be focussed later.

Don

Marc Hanson
05-01-2004, 10:51 PM
Don't forget Art Center College of Design in Pasadena!

http://www.artcenter.edu/

I'll second that one! Art Center...'76-'78. The best and most challenging period of my life...that is until I had kids.

christyc82
05-07-2004, 10:47 PM
MICA in Baltimore City has a strong art program, and have really great teachers. I goto Towson, about 20 minutes from MICA, majoring in Illustration and a lot of myt eachers teach at MICA as well. All the teachers I have had in the past that teach at MICA as well have many shows, and featured in books and such, and are active in their careers as artists. My Illustration teacher is a freelance Illustrator who works more than he teaches at times, but he's an awesome teacher. The students at MICA turn out some awesome work and get good jobs.

Towson's art dept. is slowly getting better. They are building a huge new art building, and slowly making good changes in their program. They teach a lot of basic drawing skills, but its not boring (well not all the time anyway). The whole campus has like 18,000 students, so its not huge, but the art program has about 2,500, if that. I know as far as illustration there are 15 people in the program. The biggest program at Towson is Graphic Design, art wise.

Taxguy
05-14-2004, 08:08 AM
I see a lot of folks mentioning Pratt. I have researched a lot of schools for my daughter, and Pratt certainly seems to have a good reputation. HOWEVER, a number of student comments about Pratt, and it is a large number, have complained that Pratt is falling apart---literally.The complaints center on the lack of neglect of the buildings such as "leaky roofs in both dorms and classrooms," and "mice in the dorms, " and "lack of ventilation in photography studios." Have these been remedied to anyone's knowledge?

There also has been some complaints about the head of the graphics department, one Joe Roberts, who ostensibly is continually inebriated. I don't know if any of this is true,but certainly would like to know if these complaints are true.

Dillon
05-16-2004, 11:31 PM
hi folks, i just finished with highschool (it took long enough) and will be attending RISD this september. i went with RISD because out of the colleges that i applyed to, it seemed the most professional with its training and by word of mouth its said to be one of the most helpful with finding jobs for alumni. all colleges say thats a strong point for them, but RISD seemed to be the most backed by actual acounts.

just another word on pratt, when i went there to visit, it seemed to me that most of the kids spent their time going to and from manhatten when not in class, and it seemed like they would be happier in a school thats actually in manhatten.

Also, to say that kids at any place are cold and think they are better then everone else from being there a few hours at most is just silly and presumptuous, in my personal opinion.

peace

Taxguy
05-17-2004, 02:27 PM
I just read the 2005 U.S. News and World Report on Fine arts and Graphic arts programs. One school that they mention very highly but is not noted on this thread is "School of Visual Arts" in New York. They seem to be particularly good in Graphic Arts.

Patty Brown
05-18-2004, 09:35 PM
Are there any good art schools in Orlando Florida?

Taxguy
05-18-2004, 10:47 PM
Patty, According to the latest issue of US News and World Report Ranking of best fine art graduate schools, there are NO top fine art schools (at least graduate wise) in Orlando or even in Florida for that matter. I don't know how valid the ranking system is.

I did find the following schools that offer art programs, although they are unranked: Florida School of the Arts in Palatska Florida. I don't know where that is in Florida. Other potentially good schools are: Univ of Miami, Stetson University, Univ of Central Florida ( which may be near you), Univ of North Florida, and Miami Dade Community College. Good Luck.

Taxguy
05-21-2004, 10:02 AM
To Classical Vince, What are these Atlier schools like? Are they really good? Moreover, I have a 15 year old daughter who is in HS. Would going there over the summer be better than developing better drawing skills in an art summer program?

Amy52
05-21-2004, 09:43 PM
This is such a fantastic thread!

I've been told by people that left other institutions to study here, that nscad (http://www.nscad.ns.ca/) is a very fine institute in Canada.

I heard NSCAD was a good art school too, im hoping to go there when i graduate

Reignboblu
05-24-2004, 01:16 AM
My top 10


Regional (Northeast)

1. Mass Art
2. Rhode Island School of Design
3. Bristol Community College
4. Art Institute of Boston
5. Maine College of Art
6. Montserrat
7. Smith
8. University of Massachusetts Amherst
9. UMass Lowell
10. UMass Dartmouth

Taxguy
05-24-2004, 11:36 AM
Is Mass art that good? I never see it in any rankings? Also, how good are they in Graphics Design?

Taxguy
05-24-2004, 11:38 AM
I see listing of top art schools,but my daughter is more interested in Graphics Design or Advertising Design. What are the top schools for these specialities?

I noticed that few mentioned Wash U St Louis. This school seems to be rather "skimpy" in its art offerings vs. other top art schools. Anyone know how good Wash U is in the art field and specifically in graphic arts?

Reignboblu
05-24-2004, 03:49 PM
Is Mass art that good? I never see it in any rankings? Also, how good are they in Graphics Design?


Mass Art is considered the end all be all of art schools for massachusetts students.

It's much tougher to get into because it is the only public art school in the northeast, maybe even the country. Talent abounds, because the most talented artists are usually not the richest. The selection process is exceptionally selective.

Check out their web-site www.massart.edu

While the student work on it is a little old and not a true representation of all the creativity there...after rearching for almost four years about this...it still stands out as my top school, with RISD just behind it.

I am a painter, however, not a designer, although my friends who are designers are also constantly raving about MassArt.

Taxguy
06-01-2004, 02:06 PM
For those recommending SCAD (Savannah School of Art and Design), you should be aware that it is NOT NASAD approved (National Assocation of Schools of Art and Design). I believe that this is a big deal if you want a degree. Why they aren't approved is a mystery.

BETIOTK
06-09-2004, 11:35 AM
I was considering Pratt, but I dont like the idea of going to school in Brooklyn for two years, so I think I'm going for the University of the Arts in Philidelphia, has anyone heard of it?

Have you ever really visited Brooklyn? Its a fantastic location for the school for 2 reasons, Brooklyn has a very 'homey' familiarity, yet it is still the city, and there are very artistically inclined areas near-by such as DUMBO (down under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass). I went recently to visit some schools, and walked around DUMBO which is said to be the equivalent of SoHo, very cool shoppes and there was a girl w/ easel and all painting the historic warehouses said to go for a pretty penny as lofts and artists spaces. The Pratt campus itself is only about 20 mins from 'the city' meaning the hustle bustle of tourists and what-have-you in Manhattan. If you havenít visited, I urge you to take a trip and do so, youíll be pleasantly surprised.

Iím not certain which school Iím going to try for. Iíve done fashion design for the past year and a half - meaning my designs were shown at DC nightclubs - but now Iím much more interested in using various mediums of art, such as what Escher did, or painting corsets, in an effort to create Ďwearable artí, which presents a certain conundrum: do I study fashion, art, or can I do both? I was seriously looking into Parsons, then Pratt because they deem their fashion degree as a Ďfine artsí degree, but Iím definitely open to suggestions.

BETIOTK
06-09-2004, 11:52 AM
[QUOTE=pop miasma]
art schools: art center college of design, california institute of the arts, cooper union, maryland institute college of art, massachusetts college of art, moore college of art & design, north carolina school of the arts, otis college of art & design, parsons, pratt,QUOTE]

Wow, you hit schools I was considering even when I was studing ballet for a good 7 years w/ NCSA. I had friends who went and really enjoyed their ballet program. Im also pleased to see you mentioned Cooper Union: http://www.cooper.edu/ while I was in Brooklyn w/ my uncle who studied Architecture at Pratt, we met with his friends one who works for Elle magazine, and the other does interior design I believe, and she attended Cooper. Whats great about this school is there is no tuition, but getting in is tremendiously difficult. My Uncle claims of Pratt that theyll let most in fairly easily, but they do PILE on the work in an effort to weed out the weak.

Im still looking at SCAD, simply because of its location and Ive heard great things of it as well.

TeaSoiree
06-14-2004, 12:38 AM
What do any of you think about Parsons? I'm thining about going there, but I want to know if there's anything betterrrr?

BETIOTK
06-14-2004, 01:48 PM
What do any of you think about Parsons? I'm thining about going there, but I want to know if there's anything betterrrr?

'better' is relative... parsons is hailed as a very good art school and they have programs abroad as well; your best bet would be to visit a handfull of schools in NY, set appointments. I may be able to refer you to a fashion design major or maybe an art major from the school for you to correspond with if your interested. Let me know.

Good luck! Its one of the schools I'm considering too.

pinkbubelz
06-22-2004, 08:01 PM
One thing to consider, no matter where you apply, is to go and visit the campus and talk to students and professors. Sometimes the least likely schools (i.e. not specifically "art" schools) might have some really good professors.....

In Detroit, Michigan, there is the College for Creative Studies. They have both a fine arts & crafts department as well as industrial design. In fact, for someone who might be interested in automotive design, they have a well known program for automotive clay modelling-- most graduates are hired right away by the "Big 3" automotive companies (GM, Ford, Daimler/Chrysler).

On the Graduate school side, Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan is internationally well known. Most prestigious art departments will have at least 1 Cranbrook graduate on their staff. (Unfortunately, they do not have an undergrad program.)

Last summer, I decided to tour the Rhode Island School of Design and was very impressed with their campus and approach to the arts. They seemed much more "traditional" in approach-- preferring to emphasize the "craft" of creating artwork, vs. the modern "technological" approach to art (i.e. computers are de-emphasized and used as another tool vs. extensively.) This really appealed to me, and if I had visited their campus while I was an undergrad, i think I would have applied there. The plus side to RISD is that their students are allowed to cross-over and take classes from Brown University, so if you do have a high SAT/ACT test score, you will also be able to challenge the academic part of your brain as well as the creative side.

Some more things to think about-- just because a program is "prestigious" does not mean it is necessarily the best fit for you. Sometimes, a program may be prestigious over all, but your particular program may not be as good as less "prestigious" program.... The best way to guage this is to actually VISIT the school and to talk to current graduates-- see what they are doing... are they into abstract or realist works? Do they do a lot of things "outside of the box" or are they traditionalists? Do you like Urban or rural settings? Do you prefer a larger or smaller school? Are you looking for a broad artistic experience or a narrower field (such as medical illustration or computer game design?)

The up side to attending a liberal arts university vs. an art school is that you will be more well-rounded in your education... just in case you change your mind, you will have lots more options available. After all, if you are an artist, but you cannot write a grant or you don't have any business sense in regards to your finances, that won't help you in the long run either.

Plus, if you go to a state university, your education will generally be less expensive.... Think about what your final goal is-- do you want to be a working artist? or would you like to teach at a university? If you plan to teach at a university or community college, generally a Masters degree is required... in which case, it is less important to have gone to a prestigious undergrad program and is far more important to find a prestigious graduate school.

Just some food for thought!

--Iris

ChewiPaka
07-12-2004, 07:34 PM
(Edit: Sorry for the length!)

I've heard good things about Pratt, and how they're one of the top art schools. I even got some really good criticism on my portfolio on National Portfolio Day.

Then I visited, and wow....it's just....

For one thing, it's entirely fenced in, and in some places trash is piled up against the fences. The facilities are rather run down (i.e. I was walking down and stairway that was missing a step, in its place was a wood plank), and the hallway to the cafeteria (which is entirely underground, as is their student art stores) as an example of the typical hallway I found there is small and dimly lit, and gave off a somewhat claustrophobic vibe.

So while it's supposed to be prestigious and everything, I know that I for one would hate it there, because everything (to me at least) appeared dim and small and crowded (even without that many people).

Of course, people have been there and have raved about it, so I guess it all depends on what you like.


Now MICA (Maryland Institute College of Art) which costs just as much as Pratt (about 35,000 per year) had excellent student artwork, the campus was spread over a fairly large area and intermingled with the city, but everything was in walking distance of like, five minutes. The student apartments (entering Freshmen get a 2-3 bedroom apartment, bedrooms are double, except for the third room which is a single, with a small living room, bathroom with seperate shower door, and small kitchen) and glamorous, and they look out at a court yard. You can book a studio about 10 by 10 feet (they may be slightly larger) for about a week at a time (you can go back and book it for one week, and then for the next week and so on).

And the studio spaces? Wow. They are just amazing, large airy, and they constantly update their buildings so nothing is rundown and everything works.

Plus, they are in a good part of town, with acces to the light rail right on campus, and you are about 20 minutes walking distance from Baltimore's harbor. And they hold big get-to-gethers with John Hopkins University and one other college that's up there.


A college I haven't heard anyone mention is Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond. While it is a university, there is an Art school within the University which is on the National Art Colleges of America (or whatever it's called) list that you can directly apply to, and it's a public school.



The Corcoran (in DC) I've heard many good things about, namely because I do attend classes there for Highschool students (such as their Portfolio developement class), and while I don't know the teachers who teach the actual college classes, I've met a bunch of students who have only good things to say. The major con about the Corcoran would be their Georgetown campus, because the Georgetown folk were too snooty for a metro Station, and you have to find your own way there (either bus or a really, really long walk from a Metro Station).


Does anyone have any info or input on the Cleveland Institute of Art (CIA)?

Taxguy
07-14-2004, 11:41 AM
ChewiPaka, For some reason Pratt has had a bad reputation for having facilities that are litterally falling apart. I can't imagine why they would allow this reputation to continue,but it seems to be a crucial thread behind many student comments. I strongly wonder how good the education can be if the management is that bad. Check out: http://www.studentsreview.com/NY/PI.html.

Some of these student comments are very disturbing.

Axl
07-14-2004, 12:13 PM
Yikes

Since we're on the topic of school facilities, i wanted to point out to anyone who's thinking of attending NSCAD that there arent any dorms, and no "campus" persay. If you get in early, there is a dorm that you can apply to live in that belongs to Dalhousie University here in halifax, but other than that if you come to NSCAD you're really on your own. There's been talk that the school may be building some residences over in Dartmouth (Across the bridge from halifax and the school) but right now if you come here you're stuck to live in an apartment. It can be difficult since living super close to downtown and to school can be expensive. On the other hand, you can live out of town with cheeper housing and take busses to get to school but unlike the other local universities who get a bus for the semester included with theit tuition, you're stuck having to get your own. I havent lived in the dal dorms, tho i've been in them, but i can say that the facilities appear pretty standards and I havent heard many complaints from friends living in there.

So, gonig to nscad can be a bit of a jump if you havent lived on your own before. I've been told before that in the past the school didnt accept freshly out-of-highschool students and took in older ones who had more life experience. But now since they have been trying to expand the college and let more people in, there have been a lot more younge people at the school. It was a bit tough for me personally getting into the routine of school and figuring out how to manage my life ontop of that having to keep a job and stuff, but its alright.

With 3 other major universities here in halifax (DAL, SMU, MSV), and several other smaller institutions all crammed into this little city it makes for one hell of a university town. There are lots of younge people, and stuff to do, lots of music shows every week and things like that. NSCAD being so small it *can* be a bit like living in a bubble. But if you can get out and find ways to meet with the rest of the university population theres a lot of ppl out there to meet. There are a lot of art galleries, many of the NSCAD grads stay in the area and work as artists here, and many of the local restauraunts and coffee shops support student work so theres lots of oppertunities to show you stuff to the public if you want to take advantage of it. Becides NSCAD, there is also the Craft College and the DiVinvi Institute that speciallizes in animation and stuff (with $5 thursday figure drawing open to anyone who wants to come and no one knows about it!). So lots of artists and student artists around.

tentativeartist
07-16-2004, 11:00 AM
I'm thinking of going back to school, was going to go into nursing, but am thinking more and more of getting a degree in art. The problem being that I live in Michigan, and am married with a child, so I have to go somewhere in Michigan.

I'm researching it right now, but if anyone has any information to offer, I'd greatly appreciate it! :)

Tiffany

ee88
01-30-2005, 03:56 PM
Can anyone give me some information regarding Savannah College of Art and Design's interior design program? For instance how does it compare in terms of educational value and preparation for the business world?

CheshireCat
02-18-2005, 05:42 PM
I would encourage anyone considering Savannah College of Art and Design to visit www.scad.info (http://www.scad.info). Particularly you, ee88- look at the information on the interior design department. This school was one of my top choices until recently. I think I will be taking myself to Boston instead.

Taxguy
02-24-2005, 10:01 AM
I am not sure that SCAD should be among the top art schools.A former professor has published some bad stuff about the school, which can be found at:http://www.scad.info/.

Normally, I discount these things as grumblings from disgruntled employees; however, he does have a lot of information that backs up his claims of academic fraud by the university. There is also ostensibly a very high crime rate in Savannah. The bottom line is to check out this school very carefully.

Lauren F-M
03-01-2005, 01:10 AM
I've been told by people that left other institutions to study here, that nscad (http://www.nscad.ns.ca/) is a very fine institute in Canada.

I'm a graduate of NSCAD (Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, in Halifax, Nova Scotia), and, yes, it is a great art school. Of course, I was there a while back -- in the late 70's. I was only there for one year, but finished my BFA there. At the time (I expect that it is still so), they were really great about accepting credits from other places, and I'd been to 4 other artschools and colleges over the past 4+ years. I went there specifically for Printmaking, majoring in Lithography. It was an excellent programme, and the Lithography teacher is a Master lithographer who was trained at the Tamarind School in Albuquerque.

The campus is in really neat old historical buildings on the waterfront, and I'd say that about half the students and teachers were American, so there was a real Eastern seaboard, US/Canada influence there. They had some great teachers. For example, Eric Fischl was teaching painting there.

Also, you can do exchange terms, by exchanging with a student from another artschool. We had students from Cooper Union, Pratt, Rhode Island School of Design, Baltimore, etc.; and NSCAD students would be at those schools, doing their term there, BUT only paying the Canadian tuition price (which is less). Also, it's cheaper to live in Halifax, which is a lovely old city, with quite a few other universities. You are expected to work hard at NSCAD.

Students can also do a term on an independent study, if the school has approved it, and get credit. (The student has to pay the travel expenses, of course.) For instance, there was a design student who had spent a term visiting Indonesia and learning about house design. He gave a slide presentation and talk about it for credit; I expect that he also handed in a written report of some kind as well.

NSCAD also offers an MFA programme for a limited amount of students.

Other good artschools in Canada I can think of are:
OCA (Ontario College of Art) in Toronto
Mount St.Allison University (in Sackville, New Brunswick); their programme used to be the closest to an all-around academy approach; not sure what it is nowadays.
Concordia University, Montreal
L'ecole des Beaux Arts, Montreal (en francais)
Emily Carr School of Art, Vancouver, BC
..... I know there are more good places, but I'm a bit out of touch.

Lauren F-M :wave:

Lauren F-M
03-01-2005, 01:33 AM
Yikes
Since we're on the topic of school facilities, i wanted to point out to anyone who's thinking of attending NSCAD that there arent any dorms, and no "campus" persay.
(snipped)
With 3 other major universities here in halifax (DAL, SMU, MSV), and several other smaller institutions all crammed into this little city it makes for one hell of a university town. There are lots of younge people, and stuff to do, lots of music shows every week and things like that. NSCAD being so small it *can* be a bit like living in a bubble. (snipped
Becides NSCAD, there is also the Craft College and the DiVinvi Institute that speciallizes in animation and stuff (with $5 thursday figure drawing open to anyone who wants to come and no one knows about it!). So lots of artists and student artists around.

Also, when I attended NSCAD, you could also take classes at some of the other schools in Halifax and get credit. I took some dance classes at the Halifax Dance Coop, and got credit.

Re: Dorms -- heck, I never stayed in a dorm at any school I went to, except when I did a summer programme in painting at the Banff Centre. It wasn't that hard to find a decent place to live, though it helps to get to town about a week before school starts, and check out what is available. There were places that adverts were posted. I ended up sharing a house with 5 other artstudents, just about a 15 minute walk from the school. Besides cooking your own food at home, there was a cafeteria at the school, plus lots of restaurants nearby. (we loved happy hour, after a long, hard day in the studio -- also, in Nova Scotia the legal drinking age is 19.)

Besides, be aware that tuition in Canada is WAYYY less than in the US. At the universities here in Ottawa, yearly tuition is under $5,000. Cdn. per year. In a small city like Halifax, rent will be way less than in an Americal city like NYC. Plus, I find Maritimers to be really friendly. I had to get used to folks on the street saying good-day to me.

There were also regular student trips to NYC, and there used to be a place NCAD students could stay; not sure how it is these days.

Lauren F-M :wave:

andreak2000
03-01-2005, 12:51 PM
Has anyone attended, heard of, read reviews on the Cleveland Institute of Art?
Thanks!

Taxguy
03-02-2005, 12:52 AM
I looked into Cleveland Institute of Art for my daughter. It is a very small school. Be aware of that. However, it has a strong reputation.

I can't speak for all their programs,but they are known for their 5 year program. They actually have two years of foundation before you start specializing. This is very unusual and unique to CIA. Overall, you are supposedly able to get a fine education in fine art and other artistic disciplines.

andreak2000
03-02-2005, 02:44 PM
Thanks for responding, taxguy!
I really am not concerned about the size of the school...
I am married and have already attended Southern Illinois University and University of Wisconsin (for Psychology), and have been working as a therapist for the last 5 years. This will be a second career for me. As far as the "large college experience", been there, done that. As long as the teaching is strong, I'm happy. I am actually looking into the Medical Illustration BA/MA program. Have you heard anything about that? I am in the very fortunate position of being able to switch from a very high-stress career to one closer to my heart, thanks to no children and a very supportive saint of a husband! :cat:

lei-x
03-06-2005, 03:46 AM
Has anyone attended Boston University College of Fine Arts? The School of Visual Arts in NYC had been my top school for over two years until recently when my friend introduced me to BU. How are their programs? I'm thinking of majoring in some sort of fine art and minoring in theatre production and whatnot. For anyone who has even at least visited the school, how is the vibe and what is a student's potential likely to be?

Thanks! :cat:

wabiart
03-07-2005, 11:58 AM
Hi everyone. I'm new to this list and thrilled to have found it! I've read the thread and have gotten some questions answered just by doing so. Thank you.

My question: does anyone know about the reputation of any of the art programs in the University of North Carolina system? I read on this thread UNC-Greensboro was good, but actually Charlotte seems to offer more. UNC - Chapel Hill does not offer a second bachelor's, which I would need. I'm seeking a public school in a warm climate with a good art program.

Also, I'm noticing some schools that reportedly have good reputations are not NASAD approved. Is that approval vital? I plan to go onto an MFA.

Thank you for any info out there!

Peace,
Geena in Providence

Kitvamps
03-16-2005, 02:00 AM
Has anyone heard of Laguna College of Art and Design?

cherylalala
03-19-2005, 12:13 AM
Patty, According to the latest issue of US News and World Report Ranking of best fine art graduate schools, there are NO top fine art schools (at least graduate wise) in Orlando or even in Florida for that matter. I don't know how valid the ranking system is.

I did find the following schools that offer art programs, although they are unranked: Florida School of the Arts in Palatska Florida. I don't know where that is in Florida. Other potentially good schools are: Univ of Miami, Stetson University, Univ of Central Florida ( which may be near you), Univ of North Florida, and Miami Dade Community College. Good Luck.


Ringling School of Art & Design is considered top . Ringling School is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design [NASAD], the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree [SACS], and by the First Professional Degree Level by the Foundation for Interior Design Education Research [FIDER].

Taxguy
03-19-2005, 02:29 PM
You are right. I have forgotten about Ringling in Florida. Oh well.

*~eVaNeScEnCeRuLeS~*
03-22-2005, 08:09 PM
hi everybody. I've been reading about all of the art schools you've been talking about. I also want to go to art school. I just have no idea what I want to do or where I want to go to school. I live in Ky and am only a sophomore in high school but I know that I just want to do something with art, or drawing, or something like. Idk. What do you think?

Arch Stanton
03-23-2005, 09:46 PM
I just have no idea what I want to do or where I want to go to school.

Not such a bad thing. I would suggest doing art and looking at art-- both as much as possible. Many students (not just art students) don't know what they want to do in college until they take a few classes. Often there are careers in a field that you never even thought of. Most art schools also have some kind of foundation year, where you will exposed to "essentials" like color and design theory.

For now, follow your interests. If you like art, ask yourself what kind? Do you like the cool flashy graphics of some techno artist, or do you like the stillness of painter Jan Vermeer? There are art movements, like Fluxus, that you might like but have never even heard of-- yet. Check it out, read, learn, be inspired, and most of all respond to it artistically. You might look at the lighting of a Rembrandt painting and decide you want to be a filmmaker. The arts are extremely rich.

*~eVaNeScEnCeRuLeS~*
03-23-2005, 11:43 PM
Yeah....good advice! Thx! Do you know of any art schools in or somewhere around Kentucky by any chance?

helicopterr
03-25-2005, 02:23 AM
Hi, did not realize there was a thread like this before I posted my own thread..

I recently got accepted into the experimental animation MFA program Calarts and the Art and Technology MFA in the School of the art institute of Chicago. I have searched far and wide across the web trying to find opinions of people who actually went to either places have to say, but usually what I find is people saying what they heard somebody else hearing what somebody else heard say.

I don't know what I am going to do in 2 years but right now I seem to be very interested in computer animation and have done two shorts after 8 month learning Maya by myself. Before that I painted and drew extensively in the traditional style.

Consequently, if anyone here have went to either of the schools, does not have to be in the same department, please really give me your opinions of these schools and your experiences there with the professors and the students, the living environment, the people living around you, in general everything which you felt annoyed or amazed about the schools.

Thanks in advance!

china doll
03-29-2005, 05:47 AM
If you are waffling about making the tour trip, DO GO! There is no substitute for walking on the campus, seeing and talking to students there, and seeing what is being produced. You will probably get a feel within ten minutes as to which school(s) feel like a place where you belong. This is not just for art schools either. And take some work along. You never know -you might have your visit develop into an impromptu interview. Your interest in the campus by making the trip is bonus points for you as well. Good luck wherever you decide to apply! :wave:

helicopterr
03-29-2005, 07:32 PM
Not to discourage people from posting but I guess the lack of experimental animation graduates and SAIC graduates posting on this forum is a good sign that those guys are really busy doing something else....

greenfly
04-11-2005, 11:49 PM
Hi, I just got into Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia and I was wondering how it stacks up against the rest?

Thanks :)

Terri5
04-13-2005, 08:05 PM
I don't have any hard and fast data here, but one artist told me it's wonderful...one of the best in the country.

CONGRATS!!

Danny
05-03-2005, 02:27 AM
A lot of these schools mentioned depend on what field of art you need. I personally am into classical art so the schools I choose are the finest Ateliers in the world, here are a few;
1The Acadmey of Realist Art, Toronto
http://www.academyofrealistart.com/index.htm
2The New York Academy Art, NYC
http://www.nyaa.edu/
3The Florence Academy of Art
http://www.florenceacademyofart.com/Faculty%20Daniel%20Graves.htm
4Studio Incamminati
http://www.studioincamminati.org/
5The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts
http://www.pafa.org/contactAcademyConfirm.jsp

peacemaker
05-07-2005, 06:59 PM
In addition to those Danny listed (some of which are grad school) Laguna College of Art and Design (Laguna Beach CA),and the Lyme Academy (Old Lyme, Conn.) teach traditional methods as their backbone. Lyme has a very short list, But LCAD has a broader list of majors to delve into after you're had your foundation classes.
The Art Renewal website has a full list of traditional schools with links that I recommend.

Danny
05-19-2005, 11:59 AM
peacemaker is right,

There are 55 accredited Ateliers on the Art Renewal Center International website. Of those 97% I recommend. The only thing I don't care for with the other 3 % or so is they are mostly workshops. Workshops are ok for the very experienced artist trying to hone a certain area. They are way too expensive, for someone really trying to learn the basics because they can be from 1 to three weeks and by the time you start to learn something they are over with. There still aren't any classical training in Texas but I soon hope to remedy that within three to four years. We are working on The Texas Atelier of Realist Painting. (TARP)

Danny

Taxguy
05-21-2005, 09:51 AM
WE too visited Pratt with my daughter. Funny, I got the exactly opposite feel from students and administrative staff. Many administrative staff were curt and surly.

There is one thing that you should know: Pratt's main plant ( all buildings) are falling apart...literally. I saw a lot of paint peeling and broken tiles. Even more startling were the notes posted on some studios telling kids to remove their artwork due to leaking ceilings!

Yes, I do feel that Pratt has great programs and good faculty and great NY connections, if you want to work in NY. However, you also have to live with buildings that have a lot of deferred maintenance.

caroleann
06-15-2005, 10:13 PM
Ringling In Sarasota, Wonderful, -- Maryland Institute In Baltimore. Produced Joe Sheppard
Another incredible school is PENLAND in North Carolina.




.

caroleann
06-15-2005, 10:20 PM
just wanted to see what it was. Thanks.

Xing
07-06-2005, 12:13 AM
The School of the Art Institute of Chicago http://www.artic.edu
Rhode Island School of Design http://www.risd.edu
Ringling School of Art and Design (Sarasota Florida) http://www.rsad.edu/
Yale School of Art (New Haven, CT) http://www.yale.edu/art/
Washington University School of Art (St. Louis MO- University City MO) http://www.artsci.wustl.edu/~artweb/washUSoa/
California Inst. of the Arts (Pasadena Ca) http://www.calarts.edu/
San Francisco Art Institute - http://www.sfai.edu/
Cranbrook Academy of Art (Bloomfield Hills -Detroit- Michigan)- http://www.cranbrook.edu/art/

The schools that will often come up in "what is the best art school" discussions,
are the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Yale, and Rhode Island, but "what is the best school" is very subjective.

Taxguy
07-09-2005, 07:41 AM
Xing, both Yale and Cranbrook are graduate school only!

Xing
07-12-2005, 06:41 PM
Um...Ok.

al1234
07-13-2005, 09:50 AM
I am a Graduate of Massachusetts College of Art, (1977)
It is the only state funded art school in the country. If you become a resident of Massachusetts you get better tuition rate. The school is over 100 years old and has a long acredited history. I Highly recomend it. Boston is a great town to learn.

I also attended The Art Institute of Boston, & Pratt Institute in NY. These two are very good schools for location, student activities, corriculum, and exposure to an atmosphere of creative learning. If you want art, there is nothing like Boston & New York.

I also grew up in Providence, RI where the best and most expensive art school is located (RISD) Rhode Island School of Design, tuition last I heard was about $40,000 year. But if you can afford it, you won't regret it. I have several friends who attended there, and they were always quite proud of their education.

Al Razza
www.razzadesign.com

mattalai
03-21-2006, 04:18 PM
I know this is a list of Top Art Schools, but; when my daughter was considering college, her Guidance Counselor mentioned Kutztown* in Pennsylvania. Supposedly, at least back then (about 15 years ago), it had a very good Art program & was comparatively inexpensive.

She opted for Mary Washington College in Fredricksburg, VA & majored in Historic Preservation.

*Kutztown was/is? part of the Pennsylvania state college system. Check it out - it may be an alternative to the big bucks schools. It's small & located in a quite rural area.

Hey everyone,
Im a senior in HS and my choices for schools for COMMUNICATION DESIGN are...
Carnegie Mellon
Kutztown University
University of the Arts (Philly)
Fashion Institute of Technology

Any advice on which to choose?

Also, Fmalo, where do you live? My art teacher highly recommends Kutztown for anything to do with art, especially communication design. They have a 95% job placememnt rate and it is a state school (VERY CHEAP). But I am not sure how known they are or if a name even really matters as long as you have a good portfolio? I've heard from alot of people that the two things that get you a job in the field of graphic design are your portfolio and who you know (internships, etc)....any comments on that? Anyone else heard of kutztown?

archaeofreak
03-28-2006, 08:48 PM
You should consider Virginia Commonwealth University...they have excellent facilities having recently built a brand new art building, and have the number 1 rated graduate program in sculpture in the US. www.vcu.edu

Artistic Suicide
04-01-2006, 12:38 AM
I'm more of a lurker, but I thought i'd offer my two cents.

I'm surprised thus far no one's mentioned Sheridan College (Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning) as a candidate under Canadian art schools. Granted, it's a mouthful.

It's located in Oakville, Ontario, hometown of Donovan Bailey. ;) It's mostly known for it's Animation program, but it's gaining recognition in a ton of other areas as well. Many of the programs, such as animation and photography, are currently being updated to incorporate digital technology into the traditional curriculum.

The campus is fairly small with the various building wings grouped relatively close together and the scenery is beautiful. It's great for those that don't much care for big cities(myself included).

I'm currently taking the Art Fundamentals (General) program. I recommend it just for the sake that it's fairly cheap in the scheme of things, it gives you a taste of the art world, and you get to do a bit of everything: painting(acrylic, with various different techniques), Drawing(gesture, basic shape, rapid contour, foreshortening, etc.), 3D Design(mainly sculpture), 2D Design(posters, logo design, etc) Imaging Systems(which is a rather boring way to say perspective, orthographic, isometric, axonometric, oblique, and complex wireframe drawing--useful in product design and it gives you a healthy appreciation for computers), etc.

All-in-all, it's a well-rounded program that recently made an agreement with a few local colleges(namely OCAD, in Toronto) that allows your year spent in Fundies to count as a first year in an offered art program. A short course that Sheridan doesn't offer and OCAD does must be taken(I think it's lithograph or template making), but you can then enter directly into the second year(providing you're accepted when applying to the school).

~Blaine

ARTMUTT
04-16-2006, 02:03 PM
I know this is a list of Top Art Schools, but; when my daughter was considering college, her Guidance Counselor mentioned Kutztown* in Pennsylvania. Supposedly, at least back then (about 15 years ago), it had a very good Art program & was comparatively inexpensive.

She opted for Mary Washington College in Fredricksburg, VA & majored in Historic Preservation.

*Kutztown was/is? part of the Pennsylvania state college system. Check it out - it may be an alternative to the big bucks schools. It's small & located in a quite rural area.

Kutztown does have a really good art program. I was planning on going there back in the early 90's but due to housing shortage on campus I was on a waiting list and ended up going to Shepherd College in WV...big mistake I should have held out for Kutztown, but that's in the past.

My cousin is a professor at Kutztown I think he teaches pottery or some of the studio classes--he's a very talented artist that is very active in the art scene

Shananagans
04-30-2006, 05:48 AM
cal arts.. isnt that in valencia? and Art center is in pasadena?

ewschott
05-14-2006, 11:19 PM
My daughter and I attended SCAD's open house a couple months ago and she will be attending next fall.

I hava a BFA from a small liberal arts school, and an assoc. of science in advetising from the Art Insititute of Ft. Lauderdale, which is basically a trade school.

The thing I really liked about SCAD is the fact it's more of a college than art school. They cannot even declare their major until their sophmore year. Freshman concentrate on Foundations in all disciplines. Even if you are a music major you must learn to draw. They also have a division III sports program.

Regarding the security issues... they must have really beefed up that department because it is very noticiable. All of the housing is gated and they have their own busing system for the kids. I really can't imagine it being any worse than any of the middle to larger cities.

Hopefully I'll be able to report great things in the fall.

RainingAgain
05-21-2006, 09:59 AM
There is also ostensibly a very high crime rate in Savannah. The bottom line is to check out this school very carefully.

Rochester, NY: Murder rate is 3.49 the national average
Cincinnatti, OH: Muder rate is 2.86 the national average
Savannah, GA: Murder rate is 2.83 the national average
Providence, RI: Murder rate is 1.33 the national average

You can look up all the rates at www.cityrating.com

Taxguy
05-21-2006, 11:55 AM
Ah RainingAgain, How are you?

You mention murder rates. I mented crime rates, which is more inclusive. For example, what is the car theft rates etc?

Also, are these murders, car theft rates near the schools? For example, you mentioned the murder rate of Rochester; however, near RIT, there is very few, if any, murders. Of course, RIT isn't near anything too.

maprat
06-05-2006, 12:37 AM
Searched, didn't see anybody mention the Columbus College of Art and Design. I'm somewhat surprised--CCAD is a very small school, about 1500 students total, but with a big reputation--both for excellent work and the enormous amount of homework loaded, especially in the freshman year.

The teachers have loads of professional experience, ranging from designing cars for movies and racing, to designing sets for awards shows like MTV music, to selling paintings for six figures each and working for large advertisment agencies. Disney is known to recruit from this school; a number of students have gone on to work for popular Disney movies (Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, etc) as well as the Disney/Pixar collaborations (Finding Nemo, Monsters Inc) and other major motion pictures. Victoria's Secret holds a CCAD student-exclusive competition for product line package design each year (and Limited, which owns Victoria's Secret, just happens to be based in Columbus ;P).

Majors offered are: fine arts, illustration, industrial design, advertising and graphic design, interior design, fashion design, still-based media (photography, studio, digital imaging) and time-based media (motion picture, animation, etc). The illustration and ad/graph design majors are perhaps the best known. The college's website is here: www.ccad.edu

I'm an illustration major there, just coming off my freshman year. I was extremely impressed by the serious classes and the knowledgeable teachers. It's a ton of work but really worth it. I've improved a lot over the year.

Straycat28
06-07-2006, 01:55 AM
There's nothing better than a Cheshire Cat. What's a cat without mystery? Cats don't like to be approached. I don't like dog people much because they don't understand this. Cat's are glamourous without trying too....Sometimes when people are jealous of cats, they abuse them. Then the cat gets fat, looks crazed. Ugly thing overnight. Stay beautiful, stay like a cat!

titzuche
06-17-2006, 04:58 AM
is MAryland Institute College of Arts good?

Taxguy
06-18-2006, 05:02 PM
Mattalai, consider both RIT and University of Cincinnati. Both are very reasonable in tuition, especially University of Cincinnati.

RIT has a strong graphic design program and has a very unusual New Media program. Cincinnati has both graphic design and digital design, both of which are very good. Although they both have coop programs, Cincinnati has a guaranteed 1.5 years of paid coops. Cincinnati is also part of the Big East, which means more sports and probably more school spirit. They both have very different cultures; thus, you really need to check out the schools.

wednesday
06-27-2006, 03:57 PM
I go to RISD -- a very intensive program, though more design-oriented rather than fine-arts oriented.

ewschott
06-28-2006, 12:42 PM
Mapratt my daughter's second choice was Columbus, she also received a scholarship from the Domincan College there so she could attend both and persue a teaching degree.

Taxguy, I agree with you about Cincinnati! Architecture is tops as graphic design... but you failed to mention that DAPP has become one of the hardest colleges (at UC especially with CCM) to get into in the country. It is a 5 year program becuase of the co-op.

Heck were are still looking for money - times running out too!

osidianrose
07-02-2006, 10:13 PM
I hate how some art schools are concerned about non-art academic grades. Somebody can know what "exsanguination" means, but not have a clue about filbert brushes or clay slip. I am attending East Carolina University this fall and it has one of the best art schools in North Carolina. That doesn't really matter, because an art school is about the experience and what you can get out of the institution. Instructors are there to pull our your talent and if a person doesn't have talent, they will suffer and fail. I wouldn't pay outrageous prices to go to an art school, only because I want their name on my resume. An employer that is an equal opportunity employer will hire you partially for your portfolio, but mostly for what type of work you demonstrate at the moment. Portfolios only tell what you have done. Anyways...I am really off track. It really up to you whether you want to deal with finances, unless you can get a crap load of free money.

denis44
07-04-2006, 10:13 PM
How interesting, a three year old thread. The person who started it is likely graduating this year.

I did my MFA in painting at Pratt and also taught undergraduate drawing courses there, as well in some other schools.

One thing I can say is that the education at Pratt is an open one, where any professor will always allow students from other disciplines and classes to inquire and explore in his or her area.

My daughter went to Pratt and had the same experience as I did. This unusual cross breeding was the foundation of my art career and has remained with me ever since. It was fundamental to my acceptance of all art forms and philosophies as valid branches from the same tree.

Pratt is certainly not for everyone, but it has always been distinctly different from all the rest. I really feel that my work would not have developed as fully as it did had I studied in an environment that I wasn't absolutely comfortable in.

Denis
[/URL][url]www.denispeterson.com (http://www.denispeterson.com)

JeanineJ
07-15-2006, 05:04 PM
If it's learning you want, get thee to The Florence Academy, Italy!

HarveyDunn
07-16-2006, 11:03 AM
I've been thinking about an atelier, because I want to improve my skills. But I'm not really a fan of modern classical realism - the stuff the ARC promotes makes me laugh. So, basically, I'd like to learn the rules, with the intention of breaking them later! Do you think an atelier would still be useful for a person like me?

JeanineJ
07-16-2006, 03:29 PM
Absolutely, Harvey! As my teacher, George Passantino once said, "Never fear loosing your personal style. It's like handwriting. The rules will free your self-expression because you will learn how paint works and what doesn't work... Keep your notes! You will go back to them when you need them."

writerhoward
07-17-2006, 05:23 PM
The best art school in Philadelphia is PAFA (if your interest in in the Fine Arts).
----------------------------------------
I was considering Pratt, but I dont like the idea of going to school in Brooklyn for two years, so I think I'm going for the University of the Arts in Philidelphia, has anyone heard of it?

pmerritt
07-22-2006, 02:26 AM
This is such a cool thread :thumbsup:

The schools I'm most interested in are public universities, not art schools, though (I'm not completely sure if I want to do art for a living yet)... has anybody heard anything about the art departments of the University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa) or Auburn University? Or maybe other state universities down in the southeast U.S.?

Velcro
07-22-2006, 10:05 PM
I thought i would post a great english art school not in London.

Winchester school of Art in Hampshire
http://www.wsa.soton.ac.uk/welcome/

Then i am bias as i am going there in Oct as a mature student

HarveyDunn
07-23-2006, 09:50 AM
I thought i would post a great english art school not in London.

Winchester school of Art in Hampshire
http://www.wsa.soton.ac.uk/welcome/

Then i am bias as i am going there in Oct as a mature student

Thanks, Velcro! I am also "mature", and thinking about becoming a student. I don't think I really want/need a degree at the end of my studies, so I've been looking around at a variety of options. Do you know anything about the Lavendar Hill Studios/School in London? Any other art programs in the UK I should think about?

xylaero
07-26-2006, 10:23 PM
What are some of the better schools or study programs in France? Southern France, in particular?

AgathaChanelle
08-14-2006, 01:33 AM
Thanks so so much to all of you!i've been desperately looking for some help on which unis are good or not.

also in london, considered one of the best art unis in europe...
Central Saint Martin's...
http://www.csm.arts.ac.uk/

I only went for an interview, and there is a really great atmosphere. also has amazing reputation for fashion.

as for french art schools, les beaux arts, there are some all over the place, check out this website...
http://www.ensba.fr/
i've only had a quick look but it seems pretty good!

does anyone have any idea about art schools any where across the globe?really want to find a good uni abroad...

Thank youuuuuu!!!

:wave:

dreamingtree
10-08-2006, 07:06 PM
What happened to the Academy of Art in San Francisco?
I think that should definitely be added to the list. I also think that Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design (RMCAD) should be up there to. I visited their campus and was really impressed with the work there.

TinaD
10-18-2006, 05:25 PM
Cooper Union in NYC is hands down the best (because hey, it's free:lol: ). Hunter in NYC is also good (but there's a lot of drugs there I hear:eek: ).

I went to SVA after attending a liberal arts college. I thought it was great to get a BA first, because it helped me in the real world, whereas I once dated a guy you went to RISD and when he wanted to change careers (ie make money) he was pretty much stuck!

I loved SVA (drugs there too:mad: ) I know it's known for its Illustration department but I thought it's Fine Arts was awesome, I was really pushed to get out of my comfort zone, it gave me a great deal of confidence in attacking a painting.

wednesday
10-31-2006, 12:48 AM
Visiting RISD i felt that the students were cold, they felt that they were the best and didnt seem to be to friendly.


I'm a RISD student. Most people aren't unfriendly. We are just very work-oriented. I'm sorry you had a bad experience.

osidianrose
11-06-2006, 01:12 PM
This is such a cool thread :thumbsup:

The schools I'm most interested in are public universities, not art schools, though (I'm not completely sure if I want to do art for a living yet)... has anybody heard anything about the art departments of the University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa) or Auburn University? Or maybe other state universities down in the southeast U.S.?

East Carolina University

1_4lvl
11-14-2006, 07:26 PM
I live in Cincinnati, Ohio. Localy we have 2 pretty high ranking schools, DAAP and Miami U. The Cincinnati Art Accademy is pretty good too(but I do not reccomend it because of location)

I've talked to scouts from many schools, but PRATT, CCA and SCAD interest me the most. My biggest concern is student-teacher involvement. I don't want to go to a school where there's no fundamental focus, and where students are allowed to create whatever work they want without justification. I want decent critiques, and bluntly honest proffessors. (As in, I want to be told up front if they think my work is crap).

But I don't seem to get much information on this aspect.

Teachin2Learn
11-18-2006, 08:22 PM
no Tyler School of ART????
I'm so sad :(

cybricon
11-23-2006, 12:47 AM
Actually MICA's freshmen/sophomore apartments come in more than just the configuration you mentioned. Some are 4 single bedrooms, some are 2 double bedrooms, and there are some are a combination such as you mentioned. My son is a freshment there this year, and because he signed up early, he was able to get a single bedroom in a 4 single bedroom apartment. It's really nice.

ARTMUTT
02-26-2007, 06:26 PM
What about Moore College of Art in Philly? I believe it is a school for women, anyone know anything about them?

skiboi29
03-17-2007, 08:47 AM
this is just one persons opinion and partially what i have heard/experienced

i am currently applying to art schools (waiting on the responses) and have visted:
Ringling School of Art and Design
Pratt Institute
Maryland Institute College of Art
Maine College of Art
Savannah College of Art and Design
Boston Institute of Art

For me Ringling and Maryland were my top choices. From what i could tell and have heard Ringling is one of the better art schools out there. It has a very demanding art program and job placements after graduation are pretty much gaurenteed. As for MICA it had a great art program and an academic program just as good. If they didnt have an academic class you wanted to take you could take one at John Hopkins.

I applied to Pratt because i attended the pre college program. It was one of the best summers of my life, garuenteed i havent had that many, but still. Being able to see what it is like in a college enviornment, experiencing three hour classes, having professional teachers with real world experience who were also practicing artist themselves, and having the amazing resources of NYC. The actually college students and other pre college students were amazing. I felt right at home and could relate to everyone. Being in an enviornment where everyone is interested in a similar specified area of study is like nothing i have ever experienced. Also having friends from different art majors giving you advice is really helpful, so your not getting the same or similar input all the time.

SCAD and MECA were my backup choices. Both decent choices for art schools, maine better in my opinion. I have them as backups because maine is a small college and i want to get out of new england. as for savannah, i have heard more negative things about it than good.

As for Boston Institue of Art, it was also too small and i am not fond of boston in general.

Other art schools i have heard that are really good or considered applying to but did not for various reason are
Art Institue of Chicago - from what i hear has the best art program in the country right now
California College of the Arts (was known as California College of Arts and Crafts)- great program, in SanFran after the first year or two at the college, just to far away from home.
Rhode Island School of Design- has a reputation of being one of the best art schools in the country but is very traditional and the students are stuck up and think they are the best, otherwise they have some great programs.
School of Visual Arts- very good school, high expectations

i dont know much about the schools in california but there are supposed to be some very good art schools there. a majority of the art schools i have mentioned above are very good, and im my opinion some of the best art schools in the country but it all depends on your intended major. some schools are better than others for the major and it all depends on what feels right for you. you definately have to visit the schools your most interested in at least once if not twice.

hopefully that was helpful and good luck to anyone applying

xoUNLABELEDxo
03-19-2007, 05:37 PM
anybody know how good University of Southern Alabama's art department is?

wildart129
03-19-2007, 06:26 PM
Are there any art Schools in Kentucky, particularly around Hardin County, Ky. Right now I'm going through Art Instruction School's correspondence classes. Its okay, but most of the stuff there teaching me I already know. Charles Schultz took the same course.:)

65dos
03-29-2007, 02:24 PM
Right now I attend Appalachain State University. The Art dept. is much underfunded but very nice. I enjoy my experience there.

nephos9
04-04-2007, 07:53 PM
Massachusetts College of Art is a remarkable place - I began as a graphic design and illustration major, then switched to a double major of painting and SIM (the legendary Studio for Interrelated Media), because I'm both a visual and performing artist. It's also a very challenging place, not easy, but worth the endeavor. I can say with certainty that my work @ MassArt helped me gain admission to Harvard, where I earned an EdM in Arts in Education (www.hgse.harvard.edu/aie).

The only reason why MassArt doesn't always make US News's Top-Ten list, and I was told this by the Dean of Admisions, is that the breadth of MassArt's undergraduate programs aren't as easily measurable by US News's standards as elsewhere; the graduate programs somehow are, which is why MassArt makes that list.

I'm also going to put in a very honorable mention for the excellent art department and museum at California State University Long Beach (www.csulb.edu).

BitterSweet Studios
04-06-2007, 01:57 PM
I go to the School Of Visual Arts in NYC, as an undergrad fine arts student. It is supposed to be one of the best schools in the country! I recommend it for anyone interested in illustration, cartooning, interior design, animation or computer graphics. It is a cutting edge type of school in which the traditional techniques are taught as a foundation for a more technologically centered education. As a fine arts student, I am in the minority there. However, I feel that it is a good thing for me to be exposed to so many of the new branches of art that have sprung up over the past 20 years. For example, next year I will be taking a course called "digital narrative"- which seems to be about the edge between fine arts and computer based design. It is true that computer art lacks the emotional content of the traditional mediums, but it can also be really good too, and you know which designers have a solid art education, and which ones are just winging it. MY art work has been influenced by the illustration and graphic artists around me. Also, my skills and confidence have greatly improved since I started at SVA last fall. But if you want more of a traditional school of art, then I would try R.I.S.D. in RI, the museum school in Boston, or Parsons in NYC. I have also heard good things about Pratt, but it is in a section of Brooklyn that I don't like going to. Also, Cooper Union offers full tuition scholarships for their students! it is really tough to get in, and it is a conceptually based design school. I would have applied there if I had learned about it sooner!

oneima9
04-06-2007, 02:18 PM
It all depends on what kind of work you do, where you want to be (or what kind of environment), and what kind of teaching you work best with.

I am a soph. at MICA (maryland institute college of art), I applied to School of the Art Inst. of Chicago, RISD and Cooper Union. I got into all but Cooper. MICA is awesome, the people are more down to earth than many of the other students i have met from other schools, the teachers are all practicing (and flourishing) artists, the teachers also care and get involved, and most of all the students all care alot about their work and their peers work. Therefore much of the social environment revolves around art and music. Baltimore is also a very unique city and the underground art and music scene is really amazing and blowing up on a national scale. I'd say--if you want to be a part of history you should think about applying to MICA.
As for many other schools, I have friends at Cooper and they seem to like it, but its so selecetive that it becomes quite one dimensional. RISD is so wrapped up in "work" that they forget about the desire and capacity for art to flourish in a community and a life (it becomes work, instead of passion). Chicago is an awesome city, and the museum is so amazing that it bumps the school up on my list quite a bit. The student body as well as faculty seems to be quite split though, between fine artists and conceptual artists. I believe that art is really wonderful and successful when it is a combination of the both. I also don't like the idea of the student body being to closed-minded it seems (they are so "open-minded" that they are closed-minded). One school that I wish I had applied to is the museum school in boston. the mentorship way of teaching really appeals to me.
I looked at many other art schools before applying, including Pratt, Parsons, SVA, PAFA, SCAD, and probably more.
my experience with parsons was that they are geared toward "perfection." During portfolio reviews they only wanted to see my tightly rendered representational work (fortunately, I had a wide range of work). I don't like the fact that they weren't seeing what you could do with your own brain and capabilities, but rather looking for something specific or molding you--variation is what makes art still interesting. SCAD is still emailing me about applying and i've told them multiple times that I am already at MICA and I don't plan on transferring anywhere. SVA seems VERY commercially geared(which might be what you're into). PAFA is only concerned with traditional figurative/representational studies (which could be good for some). SO basically its all about what you want. If you're not sure yet, go to some portfolio days and see what representatives say about your work, and especially how they approach work (listen in on others too! haha). See if thats something you want. I personally like teachers who try to find out where a student is/could/might be going with the work and then aiding them in that persuit, rather than forcing them in some direction based on the schools beliefs or their own personal work.
so there is my spiel. hope it helps.

zarroc
04-08-2007, 08:51 PM
I haven't made the final decision to go to mica or risd yet. I'm just wondering, why did you choose mica over risd? Is it only because of the work load?

I've heard from people that risd has a lot of rich, "snobby" white kids. I've given an equal chance to mica and risd students on facebook, and the risd students where much friendlier. They don't seem snobby at all. Maybe they’re only the minority though.
Massachusetts College of Art is a remarkable place - I began as a graphic design and illustration major, then switched to a double major of painting and SIM (the legendary Studio for Interrelated Media), because I'm both a visual and performing artist. It's also a very challenging place, not easy, but worth the endeavor. I can say with certainty that my work @ MassArt helped me gain admission to Harvard, where I earned an EdM in Arts in Education (www.hgse.harvard.edu/aie).

The only reason why MassArt doesn't always make US News's Top-Ten list, and I was told this by the Dean of Admisions, is that the breadth of MassArt's undergraduate programs aren't as easily measurable by US News's standards as elsewhere; the graduate programs somehow are, which is why MassArt makes that list.I don't like massart. I can't say anything about the quality of education they offer, but I got a very bad impression of them on the tour.

The tour guide lied several times during the tour. At every room he said this is the biggest ceramics room in new england, this is the biggest camera in new england, ect. I don't know if any of that stuff is true, and I don't care too much, but it sounds like lies. There's only one thing I challenged him on; he said the acceptance rate was 10%. I told him that was really off, it was 60%, and he said well, it might be 11% or 9%, not sure, but I know it's somewhere around there. I can’t believe he stuck to such a stupid lie.

The tour guide pointed out one of the painting rooms and said, "a bunch of kids died" but he assured us that it's ok now because they improved the air quality and everything is super clean. I don't agree, there was dust everywhere. It's impossible for them to clean the entire place, because it's a giant maze, but closing your eyes and pretending it's clean doesn't compensate.

The dorms where tiny. and I asked if I could bring in my own bed because I’m allergic to normal beds. The massart person looked at me like I was crazy. The only reason I asked was because one of the stupid community colleges I was forced to look at told me they had a strict policy of not letting any students bring in furniture.

Besides, massart is the only school (besides cooper union) that I was rejected from. I only applied there as a safety school… They where the least selective school I applied to and they rejected me. So much for that.

The rejection letter said the school was selective and only accepted 1 in 5 applicants. They just don't give up.

oneima9
04-09-2007, 10:48 PM
choosing MICA over RISD had nothing to do with the course load. It seems that the imposed load is relatively equal(from what i gather), it all just depends on what you want to put in to it. I chose MICA because the school seemed much more diverse in artistic pursuits and the students seemed more down to earth to me. But you never know, I could say that it was most likely just the facebook thing that scared MICA students off if that was the case (i dunno), but maybe RISD students have gotten cooler in the past year or two. Who knows. In addition, MICA is MUCH more generous in terms of scholarship, throughout all of your years. RISD holds out on helping many and gives few full rides. Whereas MICA has many scholarships that you can apply for and they help alot in financing everything, which RISD didn't do for me or any of my friends (who got into and got good scholarships to chicago, mica, etc. even friends of mine who got into Cooper didn't get offered any scholarship from RISD).

zarroc
04-10-2007, 06:15 PM
The course load is equal? That's not what you said before.

RISD is so wrapped up in "work" that they forget about the desire and capacity for art to flourish in a community and a life (it becomes work, instead of passion).

Or is that just because of their personalities?

I don't want to go somewhere that will turn me into a pretentious jerk.

zarroc
04-12-2007, 04:56 PM
I can't believe I said that, you can ignore it. I'm defiantly going to risd. I've met some of the people who go there and the alumni and there isn't anything wrong with them.

russell44
04-18-2007, 09:54 AM
Why not apply to Los Angeles Art Center? Or Ringling,

russell44
04-18-2007, 09:56 AM
First, Look up their faculty. Find out who really teaches the courses and see if you can see their portfolio of work. That way no surprises. Also get referrals from the graduating class of 4 or 5 years ago where they will have a more mature reflection on the training or lack of it.

russell44
04-18-2007, 10:11 AM
Let's take a serious look at what you are trying to accomplish in your career.

If you want to be a representative painter, then apprentice under an artist who knows the business side, find mentorship.

Stay away from the diploma mills.

Make sure you see the faculty's work and when do they actually teach.

Do any of the faculty work or have worked in the real world.

Find the institution where industry shops. You may be surprised

For Graphic Designers, computer illustrators, animators et al. You still need to know how to draw, idea build, composition. You are competing now with artists from the entire world who are very accomplished.

Price vs. return. The portfolio is to get you into the door. I had a Masters Graduate from Pratt who showed me 10 flats of color samples for an industrial illustration job. I asked her how she could help me. She said, "well I have a MFA from Pratt!. Know this, have a portfolio that supports the art endeavor you are going after.

For all of you "studio artists" in non-objective painting, find a rich company that will support your efforts.

Most important, wherever you get your initial training, it's just a drop in the bucket for becoming a true professional.

sue z
04-26-2007, 10:57 PM
I've always heard of RISD being the best art schools in the country, but honestly what exactly does one mean by best? Currently I am deciding between Massart and RISD....so far I don't know which one. I know that people consider RISD to be much more fine artsy( fine artsy meaning traditionalist?) And some people consider MassArt to be more creative or weird..Anyways I know they are both good schools but does anyone know which school has the better fashion/apparel design program? Does anyone know the top art schools for fashion? Someone told massart has a good accessories dept. but i heard someone also say risd is number 2 in fashion? But at massart someone told me that risd lost an accreditation in their apparel design dept...n e body know anything about that or have opinions about accreditations?

I mean im really considering RISD because of its prestigiousness and it might help me get more connections but...i think I feel more comfortable at Massart...i feel RISD has this whole high class atmosphere....and I feel a little more tense there since you know...its supposed to have the best students since they're more selective. (plus i think i can afford Massart more since they are offering me full tuition for 4 years and if I want to go to RISD i have to pay like 18,000 a year...unless they decide to give me more money to go)



BTW has anyone heard of Cornell University's Apparel Design program...its in the human ecology college...not in the art college...


Please respond...I would like to hear your opinion and your experience in the art/fashion industry.

zarroc
04-27-2007, 01:50 AM
18000 for risd?! That's a steal. I have to pay 40000.

Massart doesn't make me comfortable. The dorms are terrible and the people there seem kind of worn out. At risd everyone works hard but is still energetic and happy about what they do. I've heard before that risd has a high class snobby atmosphere, but I totally don't see it. Have you actually been to risd? Their hockey team is called the nads and their mascot is a guy in a penis costume. How classy is that? They wear shirts that say GO NADS!

I don't know anything about fashion design, it's very different from what I'm interested in. All I know is that risd has a great illustration and film department. For fashion I'm guessing you should probably go somewhere in new york city. If you've already applied to schools and you're trying to choose between them well you have to decide by may 1st.

E.M.GIST
04-30-2007, 01:24 PM
I will personally invite anyone to come down to Watts Atelier (http://www.wattsatelier.com) and check us out, but then I am biased

saturnine
05-03-2007, 06:17 PM
hi everyone
im a complete newbie here so I request you to please bear with me
Had considered staring up a new thread, but having read through this one, im convinced that this is the right place to post
Being from another country (India) life in artschools in the states has never figured much in my day to day conversations. Therefore I have absolutely no information to base any opinions on, which art school id like to study in

This thread has helped me in many respects. My choice hasnt however become clearer (I dare say im more confused right now; which i think is natural considering the sheer variety of choicesavailable) One commonality however is my choice, basically speaking, should depend on what exactly I desire to learn/do
So I guess before I pose any questions Its better that I clarify this aspect first

Im interested in a Bachelors Degree in Fine arts with an emphasis on Painting (though not completely opposed to alternatives) preferably in the states
Largely self taught as of now, im interested in honing my skills in a more naturalistic and figurative style
Course load isnt too much of a problem however funding is.
As ive noticed course fees and living expenses are to say the least extremely discouraging
Used to a slower pace in life I dont think ill be able to handle pumping up the pace too much

So on the financial aspect of things I was wondering how students generally cope with the expenses. Is it easy to get financial aid (im an international student)? What percentage of these expenses are normally covered by Grants, scholarships and the like for an average student?

Ive seen estimations on some college sites.
Are these in any way accurate?
an example (http://www.saic.edu/pdf/life/pdf_files/fyc_ug.pdf) ifrom the SAIC site
Im assuming the indirect expenses normally work out to be much higher
I had written to some colleges and got very general replies with links similar to the example above

I have also read through the following college prospectuses:
Pratt, Risd, Saic, AAU San Fransisco Basically chosen purely on the basis of reputation (whose names we indians are more familiar with)

Browsing the internet I also stumbled upon a Florence Academy of Art
though its not a bachelors course,but the course (and tuition :)) details interested me.
Does anyone have any experience with FAA ?

Can anyone suggest any schools that fit my criteria? any recommendations?
Any sites or peopl I can contact to get more help?
eagerly awaiting your replies, thanks in advance

regards
aditya

saturnine
05-04-2007, 02:49 AM
...on second thoughts, think ill post a new thread as well

Angelia
05-04-2007, 03:37 PM
Hi
Can anyone tell me about the master's program at SCAD? Since we're on the subject here and I've seen this school mentioned but curious as to opinions other than their own web site:wave:

nitepainter
05-10-2007, 12:42 PM
Cooper Union and School of Visual Arts (NYC)
great teachers

billbtx
05-20-2007, 05:12 PM
Is there one (Good Art School) in Texas .

Yes.

Many. Check with the Texas Association of Schools of Art. www.tasart.org

Contact the President or one of the board members. They can each give you their selections (each, of course, from their individual perspective)

I lean toward Sam Houston Univ. (my alma mater) Huntsville, TX
University of North Texas, Denton, TX
UT Austin
Texas State University, San Marcos

I have friends or acquaintances at each of them and have visited most of the other Colleges in the state at one time or the other and know that many of the other ones not mentioned are also top notch. The individual faculty are actually more important than the program(except as a flashy note on your resume). So your research is only beginning. But it is certainly worth the effort. Find the best school, with the best faculty and you acquire a solid education. The real work is up to you anyway.
cheers, bill b.

chewypaints
05-24-2007, 11:17 AM
I attended Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, NYC in the early eighties. I was in the Graduate Communication Design (Graphic Design). I lived on campus for the first 2 years. The student body is diverse and worldly. Most students are very serious about their studies and art... they also learn while playing... creative party themes and the famous bed race. My professors worked actively in the field of Graphic Design and definitely knew their stuff. Most of my classes met at the Manhattan campus and sometimes at the professors' studios. The internship program provides great opportunities in one of the greatest cities.

At first glance the campus is a bit intimidating, surrounded by a big black iron fence. It's on the border of Bedstyvestant, that's Spike Jones' (of movie fame) territory.

writerdeman
05-25-2007, 05:31 PM
Does anyone know anything about the quality of teaching at New Orleans Academy of Fine Arts? I'd like to get into a watercolor class there. It's the only art school I know of in my proximity.
Thanks for any input.

ilikepaper
06-11-2007, 01:18 AM
i will be attending the school of the art institute of chicago in late august- as a first time student- and couldnt be happier with my choice. i checked the school out during the summer- i attended the ECP program, which i highly recommend! it taught me so much in such a short period of time and really sold me on the school and on chicago itself. the other schools listed here i also looked into; but everyone has different needs!

ArtSavesLives
07-04-2007, 01:43 AM
For a school that does focus on the technical aspects of drawing, here in Seattle we have Gage Academy (http://gageacademy.org/), formerly the Seattle Academy of Fine Art. Not a fancy place, and not a four year degreed program . . . but they do offer four different Atelier programs: Classical, Drawing and Painting, Still Life Painting, and Landscape Painting.

I have only attended a workshop given by Juliette Aristides who founded the Aristides Atelier. If I had one wish it would be to be well and strong enough to apply and commit to her program . . . http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Jul-2007/107691-Aristides_3.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Jul-2007/107691-MichaelHoppe.jpg

With Juliette you get both inspiration and explicit instruction.

mattking
07-05-2007, 10:47 PM
I don't like massart. I can't say anything about the quality of education they offer, but I got a very bad impression of them on the tour.

The tour guide lied several times during the tour. At every room he said this is the biggest ceramics room in new england, this is the biggest camera in new england, ect. I don't know if any of that stuff is true, and I don't care too much, but it sounds like lies. There's only one thing I challenged him on; he said the acceptance rate was 10%. I told him that was really off, it was 60%, and he said well, it might be 11% or 9%, not sure, but I know it's somewhere around there. I canít believe he stuck to such a stupid lie.

The tour guide pointed out one of the painting rooms and said, "a bunch of kids died" but he assured us that it's ok now because they improved the air quality and everything is super clean. I don't agree, there was dust everywhere. It's impossible for them to clean the entire place, because it's a giant maze, but closing your eyes and pretending it's clean doesn't compensate.

The dorms where tiny. and I asked if I could bring in my own bed because Iím allergic to normal beds. The massart person looked at me like I was crazy. The only reason I asked was because one of the stupid community colleges I was forced to look at told me they had a strict policy of not letting any students bring in furniture.


i'll start this off by saying i am a painting major at massart. i cant understand why you would not go to a school because of a tour giude. he probably has a really bad sense of humor, but yes we do have one of the largest poloraid machines in the northeast, and one of the largest ceramics depts. secondly, not going to mass art because you dont like the dorm situation is an bad decision. there are only two dorm buildings that hold maybe 20% of the student body. most kids live in their own apartments in the city. next, your are never going to find a clean art school. painting studios are painting studios, not galleries. the galleries at mass art are very nice and clean. our studios have rats and mice everywhere. but then again, we have the most studio space than anyone in the country. (i had my own 15'x10' studio my sohpmore year). i dont know what he was talking about with that acceptance rate. he sounds like an idiot, but i have heard around 60% like you said. anyways, i just thought i would let you know that yes the builduings are old, but they have alot of character, you can have a show whenever you want, you can pretty much do anything you want art-wise. all in all its an amzing place.

mattking
07-05-2007, 10:50 PM
i'll start this off by saying i am a painting major at massart. i cant understand why you would not go to a school because of a tour giude. he probably has a really bad sense of humor, but yes we do have one of the largest poloraid machines in the northeast, and one of the largest ceramics depts. secondly, not going to mass art because you dont like the dorm situation is an bad decision. there are only two dorm buildings that hold maybe 20% of the student body. most kids live in their own apartments in the city. next, your are never going to find a clean art school. painting studios are painting studios, not galleries. the galleries at mass art are very nice and clean. our studios have rats and mice everywhere. but then again, we have the most studio space than anyone in the country. (i had my own 15'x10' studio my sohpmore year). i dont know what he was talking about with that acceptance rate. he sounds like an idiot, but i have heard around 60% like you said. anyways, i just thought i would let you know that yes the builduings are old, but they have alot of character, you can have a show whenever you want, you can pretty much do anything you want art-wise. all in all its an amzing place.

goldenlight06
07-06-2007, 10:02 AM
I am suprised that no one has mentioned the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, MD. It is a very good school, and top ranked in the country for painting and many other majors. Definately one to look into.

artist_pw
07-27-2007, 12:55 AM
Hi:

It's too bad that the Kansas City Art Instititute didn't make the list. It is a great school, and I read that Kansas City has about the 7th biggest artist community in the US now and growing.

sec
08-21-2007, 04:08 PM
I didn't read this whole huge long post, but I just wanted to make sure that The Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design (MIAD) was mentioned. It's a great school!!! Also, if you are looking for good art schools in the state of Wisconsin, UW-Madison, UW-Whitewater, and UW-Green Bay have great art programs as well.

Coelha
08-29-2007, 11:01 PM
Can anyone refer me to an Art school in Europe? Or do you guys know of any reputable schools over there?

RASchutter
09-13-2007, 11:01 AM
College of Creative Studies, Detroit MI>
http://www.ccscad.edu/news/

mr.wiggles
09-15-2007, 06:27 PM
Mass art has one of the worse painting departments you will not learn how to paint or draw, great print making department, Ceramics is very good, but the painting department is not very good. The studios are a mess.

If you want to learn traditional painting I would check out Lyme Academy of Art, or The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts

trafford
10-09-2007, 05:35 PM
Dana T. mentioned The Art Students League in NYC. The quality of teaching and prices can't be beat and is prestigious enough to put on any resume. My parents met there in the the late twenties so I may be prejudiced.

http://www.theartstudentsleague.org/

Zinc
11-10-2007, 08:45 PM
Are there any recommendations for the top art schools in California? I would be majoring in either illustration or Fine arts, I'm (leaning more towards fine art).
Some have recommended The Academy of art university (AAU) in SF. but, I'm not sure how it ranks with the other art schools and how, AAU is viewed among people in the art world.

I'm also considering:

California college of the arts
San Fransisco art institute
UC Berkeley
AAU
San Jose state
Any comments or suggestions would be appreciated!!!

Arthur Oster
11-12-2007, 10:11 AM
I would like to spend a month at an art school in a Latin American country. Can anyone get me a name of a good school, teacher, etc?
Thanks,
Arthur Oster, Curacao, Netherlands Antilles, Dutch Caribbean

mattking
11-13-2007, 03:45 PM
what would make you say that they have the worst painting dept.?

Cynthiap
11-19-2007, 11:09 AM
Hello everyone! Is there a art school in montreal you would know about? There are so many I have a hard time choosing. Ty!
Cyn.

draw_thru
11-19-2007, 09:41 PM
My top picks for best art/design schools in America are Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, CA and College of Creative Studies in Detroit, MI. Both schools are top-tier, cultivating both student creativity and professionalism.

ahank
11-21-2007, 11:20 PM
My son is interested in attending Rochester Institute of Technology for New Media Design. On our tour we felt the student's were very unhappy. A very cold atmosphere and some of the professors seemed outdated. I'd appreciate any comments pos or neg. about the school or its programs. Thanks

mrlopez
12-27-2007, 12:34 AM
didnt read this long post, but i thought id put out that for illustration, Ringling (now college) or art and design kicked some ass in the society of illustrators scholorship contest this past year. ringling had (by far) the most pieces in the show. and for computer animatin, ringling was named number one in north america by various magazines.

Taxguy
12-29-2007, 12:08 PM
Ahank, we visited RIT two years ago and spoke to a number of students and faculty. Frankly, I thought it offered terrific programs especially in the New Media and printing area and, of course, in engineering. Everyone we spoke to raved about the academics. In fact, it was the only school that we visited where the academics were praised by everyone we met.

Now when it comes to other facits of the university, there we had complaints. For example, many kids complained about a lack of things to do. Some didn't like the general liberal arts. Some complained about the lack of coop opportunities in the school if imaging sciences especially when compared to those same opportunities for engineers.

Taxguy
12-29-2007, 12:23 PM
Comparison of RISD vs. MICA: I have seen both schools and investigated both for my daughter.

Admissions:
They are actually more similar to each other than that of other arts schools.Both a very academically oriented, although a very strong portfolio can reduce the academic requirements somewhat. Both require decent GPA (around 3.4+ unless you have a superlative portfolio) and/or strong SATs. In fact, the admission's officer at RISD noted that they do a recomputed GPA. They take only grades from english, math, science, social studies, and language courses and generally require a minimum GPA from these of 3.3! Be aware of this. They will lower this for superlative portfolios but not that much.

Offerings: Both have strong offerings in most areas of art and design. RISD tends to be better in graphic design, ceramics, glass, fiber etc. MICA is known to be a fine arts school and is particularly known for its program in painting and illustration. MICA does have strong programs in graphic design and has a new and up-in-coming digital design program, with all new facilities.

Duel Degrees: MICA, unlike that of RISD, does offer some 5 year BFA/MFA programs and is particularly strong in MFA in education. Many schools recruit from MICA from this program.

Miscellaneous: MICA is MUCH more fleixible regarding your course choices. Think of it like Brown University.You can literally design your own major. RISD is much more structured and inflexible regarding course requirements than that of MICA. It is similar to Columbia in that regard. RISD makes up for this somewhat by requiring a mini- semester that you take during after the winter semester that allows some more diversity in offerings.

Location: RISD is in Providence,which I loved and MICA is in a sketchy part of Baltimore. Baltimore can be a very fun city, however;but you must be careful walking around there. It certainly has some terrific restaurants.

Scholarships: RISD almost NEVER gives merit scholarships while MICA is known to give a lot of money for this.

School Tie ins: RISD is tied in somewhat with Brown,where you can take some courses. While this sounds wonderful, the semesters at RISD and Brown don't coincide well, and it is thus tougher to get courses to fit into your schedule than they would have you believe. However, it is doable.

MICA (to the surprise of many) has a tie- in with Johns Hopkins with a much more matching semester schedule. Hopkins,however, is a bus ride away from MICA while Brown is right next to RISD.

OVERALL, check out both schools. YOu will difinitely get a different feel from them. Frankly, I can't imagine going wrong with either one.

trafford
12-31-2007, 10:01 PM
Dana T. mentioned The Art's Students League, a wonderful art school. My parents met there and even though it isn't a degree school the teachers have always been considered great and it's prestigious enough for any resume. It also has very reasonable rates per month. Of course there is the problem of living in New York. http://www.theartstudentsleague.org/.

Maybe I'm crazy but I think I replied to this before. Oh, well!

bluemoonstar
01-08-2008, 01:05 AM
There's certainly a lot of great schools out there. I grew up in Ohio, Cleveland Art Inst. was "the" place to go, but I don't know about now. Columbus OH has Columbus College of Art & Design (CCAD) and Ohio State - if you've never been there, go - they have tremendous facilities.
I just started my first class at RISD tonight! (I'm just taking a foundation course for digital design as part of the continuing ed program.) RISD has such a great reputation, I'm looking forward to seeing more of it.

janevcbw
01-20-2008, 10:20 AM
Mandy, If you want classical realism, make sure they offer intense drawing and painting...this one would be GREAT!

http://www.studioincamminati.org/

jane in memphis

janniiie
01-22-2008, 12:02 AM
Hi, I am a newbie here, I attend college, The Art Institute of Pittsburgh, actually I live in Dallas, Texas where there is also The Art Institute of Dallas, Pittsburgh has an online college you can attend and that is what I do, (attend college online), I am going for an associates degree and possibly may go ahead and get the bachelor degree, we will see, oh sorry, associates degree in Graphic Design, I live about one and a half hours to Dallas, so the drive everyday would be horrible, so I do it online! It's harder but I love the crap out of it so far, check into it, there is also interior design and other degrees available. Thank you. :wave:

janniiie
01-22-2008, 12:04 AM
One more thing, I have no experience with drawing or painting, I mean NONE, but with this sites help and school I amazed at what I have been able to learn so far, if I can, anybody can! Thank you for this wonderful website!!!

Luzy
01-28-2008, 05:44 PM
Hi everyone. I'm an senior in high school and recently been accepted into SAIC. I'm curious about the art schools b/c i'm kinda worried about my future job prospects! What schools out of my top 10 have good connects and job placeings for it's alumni's?

NYU
Parsons
RISD
SAIC
MICA
Carnegie Mellon
Boston University

I want to do communication design/ or studio art. But i'm worried about how i'm going to support myself later on!

DestinysGarden
02-20-2008, 05:12 PM
I need to give a shout out to my Alma Matter Columbia College Chicago. We used to refer to ourselves as "The other art school, down the street." I know it does not have the prestigious reputation as the Art Institute of Chicago, but depending on what you are looking for it can be a better choice. CCC is private school with open admission. That means that anyone can attend regardless of the strength of their portfolio. When I attended in the early 90's they did not have dorms, but they have since set up housing for students in a private apartment building. CCC offers weekend and evening classes to be very accesible to those who need to keep a day job while getting a degree. The students and instructors are very diverse in regards to age, race, and life experience. They did not at the time I attended require students to declare a major allowing one to take courses in all fields of interest. Instuctors are working professionals in their field.
Chicago is such a wonderful city, and CCC takes advantage of all that it has to offer. I would totally recommend CCC to those that know they need to "be creative" but still have to figure out what that is.
http://www.colum.edu/About_Columbia/index.php

KA Obee
02-27-2008, 06:57 PM
Does anyone know about Paier College of Art in Hamden, CT or Lyme Academy of Art in Old Lyme, CT? I am considering going back to school to study portrait painting and these two schools are relatively close to my home. (a little over an hour away.) Lyme Academy is very expensive, but seems to have al the classes I'm interested in. It's also just beautiful. Paier is considerablly less expensive and actually has a Certificate for Portrait Painting - hmmmm

Sgt. Pepper
03-01-2008, 03:05 AM
I didn't read this whole huge long post, but did anyone mention Academy of Art University in San Francisco. (www.academyart.edu/)

earthtoalisha
03-18-2008, 12:48 AM
hi im a newbie here and all the information provided is very helpful!
ive been accepted to smfa, massart, otis, risd, and mica and im deciding between massart, otis and risd but i have NO idea where i want to go! but i visited massart and i really liked the campus and boston too. RISD, not so much. Providence didnt seem to fit my personality.
No one has really mentioned Otis, is it not well-known?

jenniewhizz
04-27-2008, 12:07 PM
It's all about what you want to achieve, for formal realist drawing and painting you are far better at a private atelier where you work closely with a master painter. Look ar the Art Renewal Centre website, google ARC should find it! You could study in the US or Europe, the Florence schools are probably the best but very expensive when you add the cost of living.

Taxguy
04-28-2008, 02:27 PM
Ahank, we know two kids in that program, and they rave about it! However, that said, they also feel that there aren't enough extracurricular programs to keep kids happy. It is VERY cold and snowy in Rochester. Thus, during the winter, kids tend to stay inside like hermits. They get cabin fever.

Second problem is that their New Media program is very web design focused. If that is what your kids want, it is a great program in my opinion. However, if they want more from new media such as special effects, animation etc. it really isn't broad based.

I have found that most new media and digital media programs are fairly new and emerging programs. You have the focused programs such as RIT in web design and CalArts in animation, and you have more balance programs like University of Cincinnati is Digital Design,which gives a broader base of courses but less intensive in any one area. It's a hard choice.

I should note that RIT actually has a decent animation program and even a program in game design. However, these are very different majors, and at least animation, is in the School of Film. RIT is also a very hard, intensive school. You and your kids should be aware of it. I guess this may be true of a number of design programs too. My daughter who attends University of Cincinnati works like a dog as does the other students in her major.

If your kid is interested in New Media, I would certainly endorse RIT. Other good schools in the area are: University of Cincinnati, SVA ( interactive media), Ringling ( animation), CalArts, Pratt Institute ( Computer Art), Syracuse University ( computer art) and Laguna College of art (animation). RISD gives graphic design that encompasses web design. It is very different from a new media program though. It is more graphic design oriented,which is why the major is in "graphic design."

Hope this all helps.

galy
07-10-2008, 04:09 AM
http://www.concierge.com/images/destinations/destinationguide/caribbean_atlantic/dominicanrepublic/dominicanrepublic_hotel_019p.jpg


I went to a little known school called Altos de Chavon School of Design [yes that is a photo of the community and yes that is an amphitheatre haha]. It is located in the Dominican Republic and is one of Parson's affiliates. There you can study 2 years then transfer to Parson's and complete your Bachelor's. It is an AMAZING school and the time you're there you feel like you are in paradise. For Dominican citizens, the cost is slightly over $1,000 a semester and I THINK Foreigners pay $6,000 a semester. It might be slightly higher now. The cost is still much lower than most American art schools of the same caliber. This fee includes classes and dorm fees.

They have Illustration/Fine Arts, Graphic Design, Fashion Design, Interior Design, Digital Design and may offer more mayors I am unaware of [I graduated in 2003]. You leave there completely ready to enter the professional field. The extensive 2 year program can compete with a lot of top-grade American art schools and you have that small community of students [about 100 per graduating class] living together surrounded by some pretty amazing and inspirational scenery and architecture. For Americans, the cost of living in DR is very low. Right now, the dollar stands at about 35 Dominican pesos for one American dollar. You can buy a week and a half's worth of groceries for $2,000 pesos [or under $60] and eat really well. For those of us who can live off ramen noodles, then the cost is much lower. There is an art supply store in the town nearby and free bus transportation to town is available for all students of the university.

The classes consist of about 25 students per classroom and the professors all live in an apartment complex about 5 minutes [walking distance] from the student dorms. It is a tight knit community. This program attracts people from all over the world from Germany to Argentina to countries as small as Guadeloupe. Anyone up to learning Spanish and having an amazing and enriched college experience should look into maybe attending Altos de Chavon. I highly recommend it. I spent some of the best years of my life there!

rebma
09-23-2008, 09:43 PM
Check out Laguna College of Art and Design. Love the location, love the students, the faculty and the staff! www.lagunacollege.edu

ahank
10-12-2008, 05:04 PM
took me forever to get back on this site. Our son decided to start at community college and apply again to Kutztown University in PA. We'll see where he goes from there.

jfein1
01-08-2009, 10:32 AM
Hello...

Another question was posted by another prospective student in these forums; so duplicate conversation. I am a Syracuse VPA graduate in Graphic Design; great professors, great program and have been happily working in the field for over 20 years... Would recommend highly, if one can afford it.

I found the following list on Yahoo; very comprehensive. The original link is listed at the end, but the whole post is quoted here

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
When you're looking at art programs in the US, you want to look at two things:

- The school needs to be regionally accredited (or a lot of employers won't hire you, and a lot of grad schools won't admit you, should your path take you in those directions.)

- The art program itself should have a good name. If it's a fabulous name, all the better, but it should at least be reputable.

So based on those two things, I'm not loving the Art Institute chain of schools that another poster mentioned.

The colleges that are most famous and respected for their art programs are:
- Rhode Island School of Design
- The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (not part of the AI chain)

Those are like the Ivy League of art programs. Other extremely reputable and famous art programs are at:
- UCLA
- USC
- California Institute of the Arts
- Art Center College of Design
- Cranbrook
- Virginia Commonwealth U
- Carnegie Mellon
- School of Visual Arts
- Arizona State
- California College of Arts & Crafts
- Maryland Institute
- Pratt
- Rochester Institute of Tech
- Syracuse
- Temple
- Mass Art
- Parsons
- SUNY Alfred (for ceramics only - for the other arts, I'm not loving it. But the best ceramics program in the US.)

Those are some of the best ranked art programs out there. Some are at pure art schools, and others at full universities, so you can pick, depending on your preference.

Another poster mentioned Savannah College of Art & Design (SCAD). I consider that an up and coming program. It's not in the elite, but it's certainly one of the better programs in the southeast, and I have a soft spot for it. Its grads do well.

In reality, for most art fields, so long as your art program meets the two requirements I held, above, you'll usually get a job/get into grad school based mainly on your portfolio, rather than where you went to school. So no matter where you go, make sure that you do some internships to get real world experience in whatever field you're studying, and come out of there with a crackerjack portfolio.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Link:
answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080128103632AAw8sLk

Hope this info is useful.

circular
01-10-2009, 01:04 PM
I apologize if this has already been brought up, but any opinions on the Art Academy of San Francisco?

kevinwueste
01-10-2009, 09:52 PM
Circular, I am a fine art student ( and also take some illustration) classes at the Academy. That list above your post ( by jfein1) is, in my opinion a horribly incomplete and inaccurate list ( depending on what you want to learn). RISD ? for fine art ? not in this decade.. illustation ? not really.. CCA or Parsons or UCLA or USC for fine art ? absolutely not! ( ok CCA if you are an abstract modern expressionist absolutely!)..It works like this: where are the best teachers teaching for what you want to learn ? what is the product quality ( e.g,. the work) of the students who learn from them ? For illustration i think that, yep the Academy of Art is right up there near the top.. I would also wonder, where are the Ateliers that are really REALLY directed and focused and in most cases excellent ? GCA in nYC ? top top top, as is Incamminati in Philly and LAFAA in Los Angeles, and I would say, Gage in Seattle. Why aren't any of these amazing schools on this list ? Accredidation ? ok that is a checkmark against the ateliers but don't count them out they are so good! oh - The Art Students League in NYC also has some excellent teachers ( though they may have started their own school ( e.g., Michael Grimaldi).. Tony Ryder's school in Santa Fe ? excellent place to learn;

-want to learn from Henry Yan, Zhao Ming Wu, Tae Park and Craig Nelson, John Wentz, Chris Canga, Kristen Le, Tomutsu Takeshima and Kazu Sano ?? they all teach at the Academy of art in SF! It is not the be all and end-all - no school is and you've gotta know who to take and what classes are the right ones.. i'm sorry to be so hard core but that post is.. at best incomplete and if negatively viewed.. well I'll just leave it at that .. i didn't answer your online question ( about AAU) because I am not a big believer in learning via online ( for art stuff) unless there is absolutely NO alternative! you gain so much from the free workshops ( that help make the $$ for classes feel a bit less painful) and being also around excellent students and seeing them figure stuff out at the easel or horse next to you..

i don't think i'm any hot sh*t (yet) but almost all the art students you can link to from my blog ( in signature) are AAU students.. all current except now two are graduating.. that'll give you a sense.. most of my friends at school however work like maniacs and are driven to be excellent..

final caveat.. many schools will have one or two good to excellent teachers so you CAN find good instruction at many schools.. but that list.. well that just p*ssed me off.. in a good way. i think. no, wait. not really.

cheers!:)

circular
01-11-2009, 07:34 PM
I appreciate the insight. I know one of the attractions for me is the online aspect. Especially since I am in between jobs and not knowing for sure what schedule I may be working going ahead.

Having some wiggle room is good to have.

Miaow
02-27-2009, 02:34 PM
Hello,

Does anyone here have experience with either of these two school's Studio Arts Painting and Drawing curriculum? Neither are NASAD accredited (but ARE regionally accredited by North Central). (UIC's Graphic Design and Industrial Design ARE the only concentrations that are accredited by NASAD though.)

How much does NASAD accreditation play into a curriculum? How important is it? Columbia College is a large, well-known art school, and not cheap, and I'm wondering why it's not accredited by NASAD in ANYTHING.

Thanks,
Jennifer

jmckelvin
02-27-2009, 03:29 PM
I apologize if this has already been brought up, but any opinions on the Art Academy of San Francisco?

I looked into them before, and if it wasn't for the price tag I'd probably be attending the online program right now. I looked up a lot of reviews and saw a lot of good things being said from students. I've decided to pause at an AA degree right now but when I go to go back to school for my BFA, it's going to come down to the Academy and a school in Florida (I'll be living in Florida by the time I go back to school).

Maxine Schacker
03-03-2009, 09:18 PM
I'm the director of Max the Mutt Animation School in Toronto. Our four year diploma program in Concept Art for Animation and Video games includes in depth fine art representational training in drawing and painting, illustration and design. Do check out our website, www.maxthemutt.com. Besides the gallery pages, some work is also posted on the blog. This is an affordable school with small class size, high standards, and working professionals instructing.

sebak2003
03-27-2009, 03:17 PM
I am studying by Internet: www.trainingforcomics.com, is really excellent!!!

busybeee
04-18-2009, 05:47 AM
Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, Rhode Island - www.risd.edu
Cleveland Institute of Art, Cleveland, Ohio - www.cia.edu
Kansas City Art Institute, Kansas City, Missouri - www.kcai.edu
School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois - www.saic.edu
Otis College of Art and Design, Los Angeles, California - www.otis.edu
California College of the Arts, San Francisco, California - www.cca.edu
Tyler School of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - www.temple.edu/tyler
Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York - www.pratt.edu
These are some of art schools in U.S.A .
The most thing for art is our creativity. just think entire different from others this makes you to become a fine artist.

lovestofish
04-18-2009, 09:54 AM
A school does not make you a better artist. Your work ethic makes you a better artist. A school with a reputation is not necessarily going to rise to being more than a school with a reputation. I say this in part because there are multitudes of young talented artists that don't attend a school that is on a "best list". The other side of the coin is that I have been less than impressed by work of students from a "school with a reputation". The ones to benefit from the widespread belief of a list is the schools, not the student. If you don't get into the school you want to get into, you will still learn and grow but it all distills down to your work ethic.

jmckelvin
04-18-2009, 10:35 AM
A school does not make you a better artist. Your work ethic makes you a better artist. A school with a reputation is not necessarily going to rise to being more than a school with a reputation. I say this in part because there are multitudes of young talented artists that don't attend a school that is on a "best list". The other side of the coin is that I have been less than impressed by work of students from a "school with a reputation". The ones to benefit from the widespread belief of a list is the schools, not the student. If you don't get into the school you want to get into, you will still learn and grow but it all distills down to your work ethic.
I agree, I was going to go to MICA, I got in but couldn't pay for it. Now I've seen several people that go/went there and I really don't like their work. So in a way I don't feel as bad about not going. I ended up going to a community college but I'm also trying to learn a bit on my own. I'm going to try for a BFA later in life, and maybe I'll look into one of those schools with a rep, if it works out for where I'm living at that time. If not whatever school is closest will probably work out fine.

damienstoy
05-23-2009, 05:47 PM
Speaking as a parent (who is draining her retirement fund to pay for all this...), accreditation is very important to me. If my daughter finds herself doing exactly what she wants, that will be wonderful. If, on the other hand, she can't get work doing the things she wants to do, she'll be able to get into any UC or State University and within two years she can be teaching.

Can't do that without accreditation, no matter how good your portfolio is.:D

Maxine Schacker
05-24-2009, 08:55 PM
There are many people with BFA degrees who are out of work. At one time, a BA was a passport to employment, but that is no longer true. As far as teaching is concerned, it too is an art and we need teachers who have a calling for teaching. Teaching shouldn't be what you do if all else fails.

In my experience people succeed at what they have a passion to do because they have the motivation and interest to work hard. In all the art fields that are commercial, solid foundation skills and traditional representational skills make people valuable. Too many BFA grads can't paint an apple. This is not to discount the value of a solid liberal arts education. Knowledge, afterall, is power...it's not the degree. It's the knowledge and the curiosity and the ongoing passion to keep learning and growing that lead individuals to success.

glace
05-30-2009, 01:05 AM
Has anyone heard anything good about LCAD? (Laguna College of Art and Design) I heard in the future they might get dorms but I'm not quite sure about that. Does anyone know of any art colleges that actually provide on campus housing or is that a bit too much from what I'm asking? :P

jmckelvin
05-30-2009, 08:38 AM
Has anyone heard anything good about LCAD? (Laguna College of Art and Design) I heard in the future they might get dorms but I'm not quite sure about that. Does anyone know of any art colleges that actually provide on campus housing or is that a bit too much from what I'm asking? :P

I know MICA has housing, but based on the school location in your question that might be a little far for you. Though since MICA has housing other schools are bound to have it too.

Maxine Schacker
07-07-2009, 10:22 AM
They post on conceptart.org and seem to have programs similar to ours (Max the Mutt Animation School, Toronto). Check out the "Art and Education Forum."

Maxine Schacker
07-07-2009, 10:29 AM
Lavender Mist,

Are you being funny or is your spelling and word usage really weak? You were "accepted," not "excepted." It's "stood," not "stud." There are many more errors! Your degree will not get you a good job by itself. Please, for your sake, make an effort to improve your English skills!

paint18
08-15-2009, 02:35 PM
Has anyone heard of the Cleveland Institute of Art (CIA) in Ohio? I had been considering going there but it costs a lot.

Sulla
11-21-2009, 03:16 PM
Not sure if this qualifies but I am working on a free online art course / school (non degree). The course is very realism oriented and will have sections on concept art, illustration and comic art besides the normal fine art sections. I also have tried to make it very logical and step by step starting with the basics. And it seems to be working. I know already I am getting a lot of students who did not get the knowledge and skills they needed or college. And also students that do not live in an area where there is a good school.

http://www.artphotofilm.com/forum/index.php?www;page=page4719

fieldarchy
11-30-2009, 11:32 PM
Is there one (Good Art School) in Texas .

Yes, UNT is a good Fine Arts school. They have one of the toughest programs I've ever heard of. I'm on my second BA (third degree overall) getting it in Studio Art at University of North Texas and it's the most demanding program I've been in yet. Way tougher than my Master's in Information Systems ever was.

Briar Rose
12-04-2009, 10:15 PM
That's because back in the day Texas had the worst schools. Now they changed everything, and they make it challenging.


Is it the program that makes it good, or the size and space of the classroom, or what?

However, there are teacher's that just give asignments, and then never teach or show techniques at all schools. You knever know which one you'll get.

b123
12-06-2009, 03:19 AM
That's because back in the day Texas had the worst schools. Now they changed everything, and they make it challenging.


Is it the program that makes it good, or the size and space of the classroom, or what?

However, there are teacher's that just give assignments, and then never teach or show techniques at all schools. You never know which one you'll get.
I would also suggest caution in choosing an art school. I recently gave a one-week painting workshop to a first year art student at one of the top San Francisco art schools and a few weeks later he decided to drop out of art school. He told me that he had learned more in that one week than he had learned in the whole of the previous year at art school! What does that say about the state of teaching in some of our top art schools?

I personally decided not to go to art school but to try and find the best painters I could and spend time with them, and then supplement this one-on-one training with specialized courses in topics like notan, the elements of design, figure drawing, portrait painting, and other specialized topics. It was difficult to find a lot of this knowledge at times but eventually I did manage to dig it out. The biggest problem was that no-one has been teaching it for years now, at least not since the 60's. It cost just about the same as going to art school but in the end I think I got much better training. (... no degree but that was not important to me since I already had a degree in another subject).

My personal advice to anyone starting out would be to start with the old tried and proven academic method of training and build up a foundation of drawing skills with plaster casts for a year, and then get experience with the live model for another year at least. Only work with color after a year or two of this basic training. Then supplement this basic training with color training as it was taught by Henry Hensche and Sergei Bongart in the mid part of the last century (this was something that was not in the old academic curriculum by the way). Then after you have acquired these basic skills work on design and composition. You could also do these things in parallel. Then after all this work on expression and brushwork - the components that will distinguish your work from everyone else.

It is my opinion that with a foundation like that, you could become a master painter but that without it you can never become a good painter. The same foundation is also very useful for anyone working in the film industry.

On the other hand if you want to do contemporary art, you don't need much of a foundation. In fact you really don't need much skill, and with the right marketing you could become famous - all you need is creativity and to 'express yourself''. That is what most of the art school teachers will advise.

But if you look at a lot of the reaction to so-called contemporary art, you will find 'the emperor's clothes' effect mentioned a lot. I suspect that the end of the contemporary art movement and concept art, where innovation is valued and quality not valued, is not far away. Oddly enough contemporary art is really only an extension of what Duchamp started in 1917 with his urinal piece, so the principal idea behind contemporary art is really quite dated! It is hardly contemporary at all. Only the momentum and self-interests of the art establishment are keeping this now dated movement going. It is this same momentum and self interest that has resulted in the problems with current art education.

Hope this helps!

UnRuli
12-28-2009, 01:18 PM
I find it amazing that in all of these pages that Kendall College of Art & Design was never mentioned! It's not a large school, but it offers degrees in Fine Art Printmaking, Sculpture & Functional Art, Painting, Drawing, Interior Design, Art Education, Art History, Photography, Digital Media, Metals & Jewelry Design, Industrial Design, Illustration and Furniture Design.

I am currently an Illustration student (albeit a non-traditional student as I will be 41 when I graduate) and I feel strongly that the education I'm getting is VERY useful. I've learned a number of different painting and drawing techniques and have found that the instructors are not only talented, but are active in teaching and willing to find someone else to help you in a method if they themselves do not know how to do it.

I don't know about the other programs but in Illustration the instructors are excellent at providing demos (they regularly say that as a paying student we deserve to see how something is done and if an instructor is unwilling to provide a demo we are encouraged to push the matter). Because we don't have thousands of students like a program such as Ringling we don't tend to get nearly as many students in to the Society of Illustrators show, but we are regularly represented (last year one of our students received a top prize and her artwork is the work displayed on this year's Call for Entries poster!).

I was accepted at a number of other schools that have been listed, but I chose Kendall and I'm certainly pleased with my decision.

bdswagger
02-01-2010, 07:20 PM
If you just want excellent art instruction and are not concerned about a BFA, the Art Students League of New York, has world famous instructors and a full time schedule of classes in painting and drawing, and other media.


Yep, superb artist teachers, its in the center of NYC, and its not very exspensive either. If you dont care about a degree, take a look at them. Some of the very best Realist artists are teaching there.

Leigh

ahank
02-18-2010, 04:23 PM
I have read many good things about Sheridan in Toronto can anyone tell me anything else about the school in contrast to others?

Thanks,

mskeeter
05-01-2010, 05:18 AM
Here is the list of the cream of the crop (http://www.schoolofinteriordesign.org/interior-design/top-100-interior-design-schools-worldwide-21.html) in terms of education, environment, facilities, faculties, and professional preparation worldwide. Interior design schools does not get any better than these schools. Browse over the list.

Miaow
05-17-2010, 12:56 AM
Are there any students or alumni of Northern Illinois University here? I'm considering going back to school to major in Illustration.

I'm also interested in hearing about any experiences with online learning, particularly Academy of Art University (the actual campus is in San Francisco)

PlaysWithPencils
01-06-2011, 10:23 PM
I was wondering what you guys would suggest for me.
I am a late blooming artist wanna be.
I have children and cannot just up and start going to college again for art.
I would love to have some formal training thou and do not know where to or what to look for.
I was thinking maybe a studio to study at?
At this point after dabbling in many things, I know art is for me.
So, I have been self training with tutorials and lessons on line.
I am in the FT. Lauderdale/ Miami area.

EBristow
05-27-2011, 05:55 PM
Fulll Sail is very business orinted. they just want your money. I went there for a while but ended up leaving. i wish I never went there or herd of them personaly. i went there for their animation program.

Ron Morris
07-18-2011, 08:19 PM
I attended PAFA, loved it

RachelFlyer
07-21-2011, 10:16 PM
Try the art supply stores, first. You can find some top-notch instructors that way, and the classes are frequently in the evenings after the store has closed for the day. Also try your community college. The classes themselves are usually pretty basic, but some of the teachers are professional artists who simply teach on the side. Those teachers will know where the best workshops will be, when you're ready to move on. Another group that will have information for you, is your local art association.
Cheers!
Rachel

I was wondering what you guys would suggest for me.
I am a late blooming artist wanna be.
I have children and cannot just up and start going to college again for art.
I would love to have some formal training thou and do not know where to or what to look for.
I was thinking maybe a studio to study at?
At this point after dabbling in many things, I know art is for me.
So, I have been self training with tutorials and lessons on line.
I am in the FT. Lauderdale/ Miami area.

soulsurfergale
09-28-2011, 11:24 PM
the best site to know what's the best school for you http://collegeoptions.us might wanna check it! it's so cool ^_^