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animal
11-10-2000, 10:44 PM
I jut recently discovered pens(pen and ink?). My pens have recently dried out and was wondering if I have to buy new pens or can refill them and how,
they are staedtler pens(no 01 ,03 and 05)

arlene
11-11-2000, 01:29 AM
Animal,
Staedler makes a cleaner for the pens. You just separate all the pieces, then drop them in the cleaner for a few hours, take it out and run it under water. Then refil the pens.

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http://www.artdebut.com/arlene0.htm (http://www.artdebut.com/arlene.htm)

animal
11-11-2000, 07:15 AM
Thanks Arlene,

But I don`t know how to take them apart and where to refill them?

JOHN MOLNAR
11-12-2000, 11:11 AM
Originally posted by animal:
I jut recently discovered pens(pen and ink?). My pens have recently dried out and was wondering if I have to buy new pens or can refill them and how,
they are staedtler pens(no 01 ,03 and 05)

If you get tired of constantly cleaning out tech pens, try using dip or nib pens. They can also be loaded with acrylic casein and watercolor paints.
Then if they clog, try rewetting the tip in water to continue ink flow.
If the nib is really gummed up dip it in a cup of FANTASTIK household cleaner. Then swish it in water, dry and dip in ink again.
Also, you can buy disposable tech pens in several gauges with nylon tips that never clog and are permanent.

JOHN MOLNAR

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kaz
11-12-2000, 01:41 PM
http://staedtler.com they also have a discussion forum you could the question there.

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Proverbs 12:14 From the lips a man is filled with good thing`s as surely as the work of his hand`s rewards him

sgtaylor
11-16-2000, 10:38 AM
I would second Mr. Molnar's remarks, and add that technical pens cannot easily achieve the expressive quality most artists look for in their work. The technical pens were invented for drafting and technical illustration - they produce deliberately mechanical and sterile line work. There are a number of good dip pens on the market, and most are not at all expensive - probably the true bargain of the art supply world. Once you get used to them, I think you will find them far superior to the pens you are using.

Gail
11-16-2000, 07:50 PM
I definitely agree that dip pens are the way to go! There is much more personality to the lines--variety is achieved by alternating degress of pressure on the pen. Most important thing to remember is to pull strokes rather than push them--pushing leads to splashes! They are great for applying masking fluid in delicate patterns, and can also be used with paints. I never "dip" my dip pens (leads to unpredictible blobs of ink on end of nib)--instead, I load them by dipping an inexpensive brush (a child's nylon brush is fine) into the ink or paint, and wiping the paint laden brush across the top of the nib.

animal
11-23-2000, 08:25 PM
Just as an update, I contacted Staedtler about the pens I was using but they said they were not refillable but that`s ok I will use them for now http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/cool.gif

viking57
11-26-2000, 10:08 AM
SG and Gail,I'd have to agree with you both.
Dip pens do give you more flair in your ink
work. Still, I use technical pens(Rapidographs) for stippling work. I have found these to be the best tool for the purpose. I have tried throw-away Microns but found the tip too soft and unless you hold it totally vertical the dots become deformed. Pen & Ink Art By RC Guthrie (http://www.guthrieart.com)