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sgtaylor
11-16-2000, 10:32 AM
In light of numerous remarks made to me over the years, and recent posts by Rob on the oil forum, I am considering trying gouache one more time, and was wondering if anyone could give me some hints.

I've only used gouache for a couple of school projects, and the results were less than stellar. I tried using them pretty much straight out of the tube, but was unable to achieve the smooth, even shades and surfaces that I wanted. (Big gloppy brushstrokes everywhere.) I also tried thinning them down with water, and only managed to achieve something that looked like very bad watercolor.

If you know what I was doing wrong, please let me know. When (if) I ever have any money again, I'm going to look for Rob's book out on the out-of-print sites, but for now, I'm going to have to try to get along without it.

Thanks

arlene
11-16-2000, 11:33 AM
Taylor,
First you must define which of the techniques you are going for with gouache...are you looking for a watercolor effect or a look that is not transparent?

If the latter, than what I suggest is mixing in different small jars the colors you want. The consistancy of the paint should be like heavy cream...use water to thin.

Also, many of the colors in gouache are transparent, and if used straight from the tubes will make the color streak. For me, when confronted with those paints, I always used a touch of white or black to "solidify" the color.

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http://www.artdebut.com/arlene0.htm (http://www.artdebut.com/arlene.htm)

arourapope
11-16-2000, 02:45 PM
Hi Sg,
I usually go for the watercolor effect myself. I thin my paints down and starting with the darkest part of my painting, I glaze in. Watch out for colors that pick up when rewetted (rewet? Somehow "rewetted" sounds really weird.) I try to start our with colors that are more staining because they don't pick up as bad. In this case, burnt umber works well (if I remember right...it's been awhile.) Vermillion green is also good. Ultramarine blue picks up pretty bad, so I use it on top.
With patience, the glazes should build up to have a really rich shimmery and luminous effect.
Good luck!
Light,
Aurora

JOHN MOLNAR
11-18-2000, 09:38 AM
Originally posted by sgtaylor:
In light of numerous remarks made to me over the years, and recent posts by Rob on the oil forum, I am considering trying gouache one more time, and was wondering if anyone could give me some hints.

I've only used gouache for a couple of school projects, and the results were less than stellar. I tried using them pretty much straight out of the tube, but was unable to achieve the smooth, even shades and surfaces that I wanted. (Big gloppy brushstrokes everywhere.) I also tried thinning them down with water, and only managed to achieve something that looked like very bad watercolor.

If you know what I was doing wrong, please let me know. When (if) I ever have any money again, I'm going to look for Rob's book out on the out-of-print sites, but for now, I'm going to have to try to get along without it.

Thanks

Hi SG,

Here's another method of laying down "flat"
gouache paint: add a teaspoon or so of ordinary dish soap to a cup of warm water, then use an acrylic or sable FLAT brush on semi smooth paper. Also try some Krylon spray gesso or primer on the working surface. This
will make the paint be accepted easier.
I`ve also used fine cotton fabric, gessoed and painted on with water media.
Another paint that I find superior in laying
down flat areas is Shiva brand CASEIN paint.
They are more economical than gouache, and very opaque. You will have fewer problems painting flat with them than gouache.
Plus they don't bleed into each other like gouache does.
Try painting in a limited palette first, regardless of what medium you chose. You will be amazed by what can be achieved using only
burnt sienna and ultramarine blue, and white.
If cost is a concern, obtain powdered pigments including zinc white and gum arabic.
Then make your own paint!
Hope these words help you.

JOHN MOLNAR