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Cuddles!
06-01-2001, 07:15 PM
When I stare at the blank white canvas, I can picture a picture in my mind. Why can't i hang onto that picture? As soon as I set a mark to paper, that image chaanges and then I lose it, victim of the marks on the page.

I've tried writing the words on the canvas, large, and bright and muted greys, and this helps to some degree.

If you're inventing the picture before you, what structure do you use to hang your composition on? What's your first consideration? In a process that takes twelve steps at which step do you settle on the final design?

How often does the final image match with that first one you saw when you peered into the white canvas the first time?

I'm always interested in finding new and interesting websites, if you have one, lay it on me.

Cuddles!


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"work is what you do for others, liebschen; art is what you do for yourself."
ss/sitpwg

dhenton
06-01-2001, 11:40 PM
This makes two of us. My work tries to be narrative, so my problem is I can't thing of anything to say. I have begun to invent fake projects to get myself going. One is to develop a gaming web site, and I have to provide all the artwork. Another is pretending to do concept art for a movie, like Ralph McQuarrie of the Star Wars movies. That's about as far as I've gotten. If you beat this, let us know how you did it!

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"Art is anything you can get away with." -- Marshall McLuhan

Shehaub
06-03-2001, 11:42 PM
Oh if I could get those pictures in my head to actually make it out here I would be so happy. I have several stories that could use some artwork and its just not happening for me at all lately. I am with you guys. If there is a cure for this, show me where to find it.

Gerald [Grady] Goodwin
06-06-2001, 12:57 AM
Grady's Top Secret Trick for Enhanced Visualization:

Okay, so you've got this fantastic idea, you can see it so clearly, but as soon as you start drawing or painting you see what's on the paper, canvas, or screen and that's all you can see. Well, here's a method that will help you produce more enduring mental images. And it's SO EASY!

Instead of concentrating on just "seeing", use the other 4 senses to help yourself see. In other words, use all 5 senses, instead of just 1. For that matter, use ALL of your imaginative abilities. Granted, this trick won't give you the ability to paint an exact copy of the Mona Lisa from memory. But it works great for simpler things.
For example:

Let's say I've envisioned...
A red apple. A big red apple. Okay, I'm 35 years old, so I know how a big red apple looks, right? Of course. But in order to draw or paint "big red apple" I must KNOW "big red apple." COMPLETELY.

Imagine you are holding a big red apple in your hand. Which hand, right or left? Is it a hard apple? Squeeze it. Did your fingers make wrinkles in the apple's skin? How big is the apple, anyhow? How heavy is it? Dig your thumbnail into the apple. Is it juicy? Did you get apple juice on your thumbnail? Can you see the mark your thumbnail made? Now hold the apple against your cheek. Is it cold? Exhale on the apple. Did it fog up the shine? Slowly turn the apple, and examine it closely. Maybe there's a little brown stem sticking out of the top. What do you know about this little brown stem? How does it feel against one of your fingertips? Is the little brown stem shaped like a curved, miniature bone? What about the top of the apple? Does it have humps around the top, or is it smooth? Feel the top of the apple and find out. What about the bottom? Are there humps around the bottom of the apple?

The point is, when you imagine touching, tasting, smelling or hearing something, you will probably "see" it as well. If your visual memory gets distracted, you can refocus it using other sensory memories. Imagine the picture completely as you work, and the picture will be more complete.

If you want to paint, say, fire, you've got to hear it crackling, smell the smoke and feel the heat.

Grady

Cuddles!
06-06-2001, 03:20 AM
Grady,

Your advice makes sense. At the moment, I can't think of how to apply it to my problem. I mean, I could use it once I've got the layout done and am working for detail, but often my problem isn't with the specifics, it's with the general stuff. Like layout, "shot" angle (two-shot, close-up, etc.), relation of objects to people, foreground, middleground and background issues.

There's probably a way to apply your advice specifically to my problem, so I'll look for it. But, this is good, I know more now than I did before.

Cuddles!

Ron.


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"work is what you do for others, liebschen; art is what you do for yourself."
ss/sitpwg

Fig
06-06-2001, 01:46 PM
I was just wondering why you posted in digital art when asking about making marks on canvas. Are you calling the monitor a "canvas"?

Regardless, whether you work on the computer or canvas, visualizing and executing that vision is problematic at times for me too.

The question of medium comes up in my mind. I know that some ideas I have make more sense done on canvas than on computer. It comes down to what my art school teacher said about using the appropriate medium for the message.

You mentioned that writing words help... hmmm, perhaps your ideas would be best expressed in words... just a thought.

Good luck,

Fig

[This message has been edited by Fig (edited June 06, 2001).]

Gerald [Grady] Goodwin
06-06-2001, 11:32 PM
<IMG SRC="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jun-2001/jill_grid.jpg" border=0>

Hey Ron,
Okay, let's take a behind the scenes look at my Commander Jill pic, which I painted last year. Perhaps this will give you some insight.

I wanted to create a tough, sexy, sci-fi military heroine in the midst of combat or maneuvers on some foreign planet. Originally I wanted the pic to have a very upward perspective, with a BIG spaceship passing directly overhead.

The original image size is 600 pixels wide by 800 pixels high. I chose that size because it's a 3/4 rectangle. The image area was then divided into a 9 field grid, meaning 3 sections across and 3 sections down. I also divided the image area diagonally to find the exact center and to provide general lines of action. I knew I wanted a formal (symmetrical) composition, meaning Commander Jill would be standing basically in the center of the image.

Size and placement of the various elements was a matter of keeping the image balanced while maintaining control of the viewer's eye movement. This is where I ran into problems with a big spaceship directly overhead. It blocked most of the sky and didn't leave enough room for the 2 smaller spaceships diving in from the distance. Basically I wanted the spaceships diving in 1-2-3-WHOOOSSHH!!! But the big ship ended up either whooshing the viewer right off the page or appeared static, so it got the ax.

Overall the pic turned out okay, but I probably should have done a better job working out the perspective of the image as a whole instead of worrying so much about the design balance. But at least you can see there is some logic behind figuring out where to put things.

Grady

Cuddles!
06-13-2001, 12:39 AM
Grady,

Thanks very much. It doesn't really apply to my question, but it does answer some others.

It's nice to know you have a plan about every picture. I don't make such complex decisions. I guess I should start.

I think, the next time I have one of these pictures in my head, I'll choose a file about the same dimenstions as the sketch tablet and try to bluff my way through as a blind man and see if that works.

Got any idea where there's a tutorial online that further describes your placement/editorial decisions? (Antime you can provide such a link, I'd be delighted.)

Thanks again,

Ron.


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"work is what you do for others, liebschen; art is what you do for yourself."
ss/sitpwg