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View Full Version : Graphics Tablet - Is size important?


Shehaub
03-06-2001, 02:31 PM
I have a 9x12. It was a wonderful Christmas gift. I think I like this size because it feels like a real pencil and paper. I haven't tried the smaller ones.

digistyle
03-06-2001, 05:06 PM
I use a Wacom ArtPad II (4x5). Its the only tablet that I have owned. It gets the job done for me. I've never used a Graphire, but it seems to be popular on a number of the digital art sites that I visit.

Remember its not the size, its how you use it (We are talking about tablets, right? http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif)

Sorry, couldn't resist that one http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/wink.gif.

digistyle

Valkyrie
03-06-2001, 11:15 PM
Well I can't speak for the Intuous, but I have the Wacom Graphire and I adore it, it gets the job done for me, I can't see any disadvantages of getting one, unless you have used a bigger one previously and might feel restricted, but it really works for the whole screen beleve me and you can work on the screen to any size/res you like as long as your comp can manage! http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif The Graphire is definitely a groovy tool! http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

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Personal Art page: http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~obsidion/myart.html Elfwood Page: http://elfwood.lysator.liu.se/loth/m/a/marie/marie.html

DavidF
03-07-2001, 12:18 AM
I'm thinking of buying a Graphics Tablet. I would like to be able to 'paint' preliminary sketches with it prior to making a 'real' painting. Over here (UK) they seem to be 40% to 60% dearer than in US http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/frown.gif and limited to Wacom ranges. They are not widely advertised nor reviewed much.

What is the minimum useful size. The Graphire looks neat (and cheapest) but is it flexible (compared with Intuos) and is 4 X 5 enough?

All advice welcomed!

Regards, David

DavidF
03-07-2001, 03:09 AM
Thankyou all for your kind help.
I forgot to ask for recommendations on a Painting (as opposed to image editing) software. Er, not too pricey, please.

Thanks, David

nnelson1
03-07-2001, 04:05 PM
David:

You might wish to try The Gimp. Full featured graphics program and it's free!!
Go to www.gimp.org (http://www.gimp.org) and download the appropriate package. (WIN32) if you're a windows user.

Nice package!


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There is no spoon...

Victoriaa
03-07-2001, 09:44 PM
The bigger the better. Why restrict yourself? It is like buying a 20 inch color monitor vs. buying a black and white 14 incher. Wacom is hands down the best tablet out there. Great support, great product. It costs more, but its worth it. If you are going to be spending some serious hours painting, then do yourself a favor and get the best and a size that doesn't hinder your creativity.

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Victoriaa

Gary B
03-08-2001, 06:25 AM
I have a 4x5 and a 9x12 Wacom and prefer th 4x5. It matches the monitor proportionally and I, at least, have more control. I really don't see the need for anything bigger unless you're going to trace.

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I love to singa...'bout the moon-a and-a June-a and-a Spring-a.

Gary B
03-08-2001, 07:13 AM
I have a 4x5 and a 9x12 Wacom and prefer th 4x5. It matches the monitor proportionally and I, at least, have more control. I really don't see the need for anything bigger unless you're going to trace.

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I love to singa...'bout the moon-a and-a June-a and-a Spring-a.

Spectra7
03-08-2001, 11:57 AM
I have been using tablets for many years and now use a top of the line Wacom. The most important issue is this. Artists spend many years developing their hand eye coordination and that is of significant importance when picking a tablet. The closer the tablet is to the size of your viewing area on your screen the more closely it will match with your normal hand eye coordination and make drawing or painting more natural to what you already know. If you use a tablet that is significantly smaller, you will notice that you are spending a lot of energy compensating for the change in scale. Why do this to your brain if you don't have to?

DavidF
03-09-2001, 01:06 PM
Thanks to all for the further (sometimes conflicting!) advice. At UK prices, I will start small and see how it goes.

To nnelson1!
Thanks. I note that the version of Gimp for Windows is described as beta, and liable to cause occasional crashes; I'll wait a bit before trying. Also, I'm intrigued to know the significance of your incomplete reference to 'spoons'in your signature?

Cheers, DavidF

nnelson1
03-09-2001, 01:53 PM
David:

"There is no spoon" is from The Matrix. Basically means, our perceptions are easily fooled by what we believe to be real. A child was bending spoons ala Uri Geller,. The protagonist watch in amazement as the spoon seemed tomelt in the child's hand. The child smiled and replied that it was easy once you realized that "there is no spoon".

As far as the Gimp goes, it may be prudent to wait. I have used it with Linux for quite awhile with no problems. I also have the Windows version on my Windows 2000 machine and have, also, had no problems.

Cheers,

Nick

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There is no spoon...

Spectra7
03-09-2001, 05:58 PM
Well my best advice in the face of all this coflicting information, is take a test drive and see waht is best for you.

tbragg
03-19-2001, 07:23 AM
David
I use a Wacom 6 x 9. It occupies about 10 x 14 inches of desk space, though it is small enough to place on your lap, or to slide under your computer,like your keyboard

Shehaub
03-21-2001, 11:20 AM
I have a corner type (or L-shaped) computer desk. The monitor sits in the deep corner. When I am drawing, I put the keyboard so it is directly under my monitor, resting both ends on the corners, while my (9x12) tablet sits where the keyboard slider goes. Then I can easily type or draw.

Of course I often tilt my tablet and slouch back with my feet on a footstool under the desk. There is something about being able to wiggle my feet while I draw that brings out my imagination. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

pixelscapes
03-21-2001, 09:16 PM
I assume it depends on whether you're comfortable doing detail work or not? Most people I talk to seem quite happy with the 4x5 or 6x9 varieties. Consider the way most computer mice are set up -- four inches movement from right to left would get you all the way across the screen, and most people have no problem working within that 4 inch area. Food for thought...

-=- Jen "Tablature forums" de la Cruz

DavidF
03-28-2001, 04:29 AM
Thanks again for all the advice. I think Nick Nelson's other postings on the Graphire are very encouraging, and for me to take the cheaper option, at least as a first step. I shall start on the family about how it is my birthday in a couple of months and......

Cheers, David

nnelson1
03-28-2001, 06:23 AM
David:

Glad to hear you're getting closer to getting a tablet. I find every time I use my Graphire I enjoy it more and more. Absolutely no regrets!

Hope the family takes the hint about your birthday and someone "suggests" that you pick it up now. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

Cheers,

Nick

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There is no spoon...