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View Full Version : How to transfer photocopy to wood? to Linoleum?


Dave's in Florida
06-30-2003, 11:15 PM
I read in a book, "Simple Printmaking" that using lacquer thinner to moisten the back of a photocopied image, and burnishing it onto wood, will allow the transfer of the image. The image then can be woodcut for printing. This process won't work for linoleum.

Question:

Is there any other solvent that works for this? :confused:

I've tried WD40, Mineral spirits, Silicone lubricant, and I don't know what else, and the only one that allows transfer of any photocopier toner is the silicone lubricant spray-- and the transferred image is feeble at best. Oddly enough, I haven't yet tried lacquer thinner (don't have any).


Also, has anyone had any success transfering a photocopied image on to linoleum, short of using a graphite paper rubbing?

Dave

sassybird
07-03-2003, 03:10 AM
Dave I paint the front of a photo copy with gum arabic, then put it face down on the plate or wood. The next step is to run denatured alcohol on the back. Let it sit for a few minutes and then lift a corner to see how it is taking. Remember that what every you put down will print backwards.

timelady
07-03-2003, 02:10 PM
I've always put the photocopy face down on the surface (mine's usually paper, not wood, but it should work) and then use cellulose thinner to brush on the back. Then you rub it. It has to be done quite quickly so I tend to brush a small area and rub immediately. And it has to be photocopy ink.

As for lino...a slightly more longwinded approach. I put a piece of paper covered either in oil pastel or a soft dark graphite face down on the lino, then put the drawing on top of that. Then redraw over the image, which transfers the image in oil pastel or graphite like a monoprint. If you don't want to reverse the image you have to do the drawing, trace a reverse version, then redraw over *that* onto the lino. :)

Tina.

sassybird
07-03-2003, 09:47 PM
I haven't tried the cellulose. That sounds much easier than what I was taught:) Thanks for the hint, gal.

doug_h
07-11-2003, 05:03 PM
This may not help in this case, but I have taken scans and output them from my inkjet printer and transfered the image to linoleum with a damp sponge. Naturally, the print has to be in reverse, but thats no problem.

Dave's in Florida
07-12-2003, 07:38 AM
Thanks Sassybird, Timelady, and Doug!

I'm interested in avoiding petroleum-based solvents for image transfers to wood or linoleum if possible, but all methods have merit.

Thanks, Doug! You da man! Your method may be the best so far --and the most obviously overlooked method at that. Regarding the image reversal, my ArcSoft photoprogram allows all sorts of image manipulation, so a reversed image can be printed on paper, then transfered via your suggestion. It should appear in its desired orientation then.

Off the the lino I go!

Dave

1vikeyrose
07-23-2003, 09:01 AM
try xylene or citristrip, the 1st one works oto transfer copies on just about anything, i refill my "Dove" blender pen with it and go to town, have not tryed the latter but was told its a good alternative for those not wanting a solvent based product.

PinkRaven
07-25-2003, 06:38 AM
I've never had a problem transferring a photocopy to lino, but i have to warn you that the transfers are usually a bit pale or a little hazy at best.

The first thing to try is a different photocopier...
there are differences in toner between brands and some definately do transfer better than others. The photocopy should also be as fresh as possible. This might sound obvious, but be sure that the copy machine is definately a carbon toner machine. A lot of new copy machines use an inkjet system and they don't transfer well at all. If all else fails try a laser color copier. There are other chemicals to try... acetone based nail polish remover is a standard as well as gin. Orange oil based furniture cleaners work as well as wintergreen oil from the pharmacy. Use caution with the wintergreen oil because although it's "natural" it can be a skin irritant and the fumes shouldn't be inhaled directly. You can cut it with a bit of denatured alcohol.

Just a word about reversing images... if you are going to be transferring the face of the photocopy to the block you don't want to reverse the print! It will be in reverse when you transfer it down to the lino and right again when you print it. I'm pretty embarrassed to admit that even after twenty years of experience carving print blocks I've majorly screwed that one up! LOL! I did that on one very detailed print... with text. (and I HATE carving text) My brain must have been totally out to lunch because I resized the drawing on the computer and for some unknown reason got it in my head to reverse it.... transferred it face down to the block, carved the whole darn block and the text and it never dawned on me that I was carving the text "right" on the block... then I took my first test print... ACK! The text on the print was backwards! I just about flipped out... all those hours of carving and I never *saw* what I was doing! LOL! Goes to prove you are never too old or experienced to totally screw up! LOL!

I think this post is getting to long so I'll give you another idea in the next post...

Rave

PinkRaven
07-25-2003, 06:50 AM
I haven't tried this but I had a little brainstorm ;)
I bet you could print out your image on T-Shirt transfer paper (right side up! Not reversed! You want it backwards on the block. ;) ) and iron it onto the linoleum. After carving the block You should be able to scrub off the plastic film, but even if you left it on it should hold the ink okay for printing. If my hands could still handle doing linoleum I'd give it a try... it would be a great, crisply detailed transfer if it works.

Rave

Dave's in Florida
07-26-2003, 03:48 PM
Many thanks for all the replies!

I'll certainly find the right combination of copier and solvent to transfer photocopy-to-linoleum from the many suggestions here.

I'll try different copiers, but so far they've all been the type that requires a toner tube refill.

Thanks again, all!

Dave

msue
07-27-2003, 09:33 PM
I read or saw some where that you can iron a photocopy to transfer it to another surface. It just might work on linoleum too. No chemicals at all in that method.

cerdo
08-04-2003, 11:57 PM
I've painted the recieveing surface with acrylic matt medium while it's wet, rub the xerox toner side down onto the matt medium and sqeegy all the excess out, air bubbles etc. Let this dry completely. Then wet the paper and rub all the paper off. The toner stays in the matt meduim. Works pretty well once you get the hang of it.

Rose Queen
08-05-2003, 12:54 AM
I have used a Chartpak brand blender pen to transfer photocopies to wood quite successfully. Place image side down on the wood and rub hard with the pen from the backside. You can find Chartpak pens in any well-stocked art supply store, maybe even a large Michael's or Hobby Lobby. The main ingredient appears to be acetone, so use in a well-ventilated area unless you just really like the stink of nail polish remover... :D



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msue
08-05-2003, 12:57 AM
We don't carry the Chartpak blender at Hobby Lobby, but we do carry the Prismacolor blender

Printmakerguy
01-29-2004, 12:11 AM
I have tried the iron on transfers, but dont reccomend them, the heat from the iron makes a lot of linoleums brittle and crumbly once they cool. I make an inkjet print, cut it out to size, place it (dry) on the lino block, then soak it with water with a spray bottle.... Rub it GENTLY from behind, and peel it carefully off after 30 secs or so.... The result (once dry) is a great REVERSED image- Ready to cut. It is a bit on the faint side, but it works.....

-Andrew

Alan Cross
01-29-2004, 01:13 PM
How about just plain old carbon paper...for the transfer I mean...
Alan :)

doug_h
01-29-2004, 04:04 PM
Carbon paper (Alan, are showing our age?) or saral paper works great, but sometimes I find in tracing the image I work it to death and lose a kind of spontaneity. Otherwise, it's a great way to go. On occasion, though, I find through the tracing process, an image just doesn't work.
Doug

''Art is process'' Paul Klee

pinkbubelz
01-30-2004, 01:58 AM
I haven't tried it, but I thinK I read somewhere that you can use rubbing alcohol on the back of the photocopy (if it's toner) and then rub it down....

Good luck. I'll be interested to hear what works.

I think I did try the ironing technic with the blocks that are made out of the rubbery eraser-type material before... :-) (It worked okay)

--Iris

Diane Cutter
01-30-2004, 06:28 AM
Oh, my gosh! Bless this forum....

I've been doing it the old fashioned way.... putting the photocopy on my lightbox, retracing on the back, and then using black carbon paper (which, by the way, is getting harder and harder to find). It's messy and boring.

I have certainly been in the dark ages. Thanks, forum, getting me up to speed.

Diane

printzessofthenorth
02-03-2004, 12:33 PM
Dear Moderator:

This thread oughtta be a sticky! :) :angel: :)

Thank you

Sennacherib
05-21-2004, 12:07 AM
Hi Guys

I agree that a fresh photo copy and testing several types of machines is the ticket to getting a good transfer. When I find a good copy machine I found that a blending marker gives you great control in doing the transfer and little mess. A blending marker is a perm. marker with no ink in the pen to blend other marker colors together. A lot of Industrial design folks use them for marker drawings. They are handy to test copiers as well. Just make a copy and whip out the marker and give it a test on the spot.

happy transfer.

Rich

Printmakerguy
05-21-2004, 07:55 AM
Ahhh... The thread that never dies...

Great tip! I will have to go get a blending marker- I still havent found a decent photocopier yet... Perhaps this is the trick- Makes it a lot easier to test, for sure!

awcomix
12-18-2005, 07:57 AM
Hi I came across these forums whilst researching photocopy art. I noticed a discussion based on the transferring of photocopies onto lino. Iím very interested in this topic as earlier in the year I was looking at simular things but then decided why go to the trouble of transferring photocopies, why not just use photocopies as prints? If anyone is interested in discussing this with me email me at [email protected]

mLee
12-18-2005, 09:18 AM
Placing the photocopy face down on the block then rubbing oil of wintergreen on the back works.

bridog
12-18-2005, 11:35 AM
wow
lots of methods here
I have tried a few of these, some successful and some not so much
since I am a bit more of a "patient type" I tend to scan my original drawing and print it out in reverse off my printer
then on backside of paper I rub litho crayon across the surface
I tape edges of the paper (crayon side down) onto the lino block edge and underside and trace lines or shade large areas with pencil overtop of original drawing facing me
the litho crayon transfers onto surface of lino quite well I find

Joost
12-18-2005, 11:35 AM
I have never tried the following, but it should work IF you have an inkjet printer with a straigth paper path and your linoleum is not too thick (my printer can accomodate a thickness up to 5 mm): coat the linoleum with InkAID (a coating especially made to allow for printing on any surface) and scan & print the image (of course backwards).

travelerjjm
12-18-2005, 12:53 PM
Has anyone tried Lazertran (http://www.lazertran.com/)?
While more expensive than a photocopy, it might produce good results. Sounds like less work and no toxic chemicals.

dragoni689
12-19-2005, 01:21 AM
For you screen printers, Mr. Murphy's Orange Based Screen wash solution works great for photocopy transfers- because it has a slow drying time and dissolves plastics immediately, in our shop here at SCAD we've found it to work wonders.

All you have to do is put a liberal amount on a paper towel or rag and rub it into the surface of the wood or linoleum block you wish to transfer your image to, place your photo copy where you wish to have it transfer, put down a couple news-print backing sheets, and either burnish or run the entire thing through a printing press under printing pressure with blankets. The image transfers better using this method than any other I've tried (and i've done acetone, laquer thinner, wintergreen, heat transfer, and the blending markers).

all photo-copy dust is: microscopically ground plastic dust particles. Therefore, really, any solvent that will dissolve or melt plastic will work. Your alcahols and stronger citric acids work best. Heat can work pretty well too- especially on linoleum. Got an iron and a couple sheets of newsprint?

Heft
07-29-2007, 12:22 AM
traveler: I tried Lazertran with linoleum and found it to be unsatisfactory with inkjet prints. Its really just a decal that once transferred and dry it peels off when cut through with an exacto and crumples when trying to cut using standard linotools. Their support suggested several ways they said maybe might work but they involved solvents I didn't want to deal with.

CarolAnnH
07-29-2007, 05:49 PM
I know nothing about any of this. I don't know what planet I live on but I'd never heard of blending pens! Well, anyway, I did a Yahoo Search for several of the products mentioned so now I know what they are. In my search I came across two sites that might be of interest in regard to this discussion about transferring images -

http://www.art-e-zine.co.uk/imageblend.html
(a transfer process using photocopies and a blender pen - onto watercolour paper.)

http://www.stampinart.com/library/techniques/blenderPenRefill.html
(Refill recipes and how to refill a blender pen)

juliet8
09-06-2007, 03:23 PM
For image transferring on any surface photocopyies are the best, but since I don't have ready access to one, (or does anyone for that matter?) My laserjet printer works great, (its a HP laserjet 4p). The ink doesn't smear once water or mat medium(glue) is put on the image. Mat medium, watered down elmers glue also works, or what I've been using is "mod podge" glue. I've tried other methods of transfering images, usually with chemicals and then rubbing the image. But it ends up making your studiospace smell something awful and thats not good especially if you live there too. This is an example of using the mod podge or watered down glue.
http://docs.google.com/FilePage?id=dcf87kc4_11hdwchhf9
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Sep-2007/115856-japanesewoman.jpg

LetterC
09-07-2007, 11:28 PM
I've mentioned this before, but what the heck? It works. Moisten or clean the surface to be transferred ON TO with baby wipes or hand wipes. While the surface is still moist place the photocopy face down and burnish the back. Don't moisten the copy. It works for both laser and inkjet copies but one is more successful than the other. I'll have to check which is which. It's easy. It's readily available and your studio will smell like a baby.
Carol

mlogusz
08-03-2008, 09:41 AM
Transfering Photocopy to Linoleum Block
Prepare image on computer.
You may want to consider bumping up the contrast and brightness of the image now. Also converting image to greyscale may help too.
Print it out backwards using 'mirror image' or 'reverse print' or 'flip horizontal' under advanced settings. If your printer doesn't have these settings then in your Photo-program (like PhotoShop) click image / flip horizontal before printing so your image/text is backwards on screen (and thus on your printout and photocopy).
Depending on your type of printer ink/toner sometimes transfers won't work so make a photocopy on a real photocopier.
Place photocopy face-down onto block.
Moisten back with ACETONE.
Let dry (will dry in mere seconds).
Peel back.It must be Acetone (not mineral spirits, laquers, rubbing alcohol, lamp oil, paint thinner, etc.--I forgot which to use and tried them all until I opened the acetone). Acetone may be purchased for about $20/gallon in a hardware store, but cheaper and smaller containers are available at art suppliers. A gallon would probably last a life-time.

Depending on your computer printer you might need an actual photocopy first. Ink-jet based printers don't seem to work, you'll need a toner based printer (or just photocopy your backward printout). Also be careful, you'll want to use a toner-based photocopier as well (a 'real' photocopier, not just an ink-based printer/scanner/fax machine some places have...though if it's toner based those should work too). Some people's 'laserjet' printers will transfer as well. Liquid Ink cartridges=bad, Expensive Dusty Toner carts=good.

The paper may 'stick' to the linoleum block, so if the image permits you may want to dog-ear a corner or have a knife around to help peel it up. Remember, if you don't like how it transfer (crooked, etc.) just wipe the block clean with more acetone and try again.

Also: If you have nail polish remover around, check the ingredients--it may be mostly acetone.

Someone posted a YouTube video of the process, just search for 'acetone transfer'.

Cheers,
mlogusz

Deesart
08-03-2008, 11:08 AM
My friend demonstrated a nifty gum arabic transfer method based on the same oil vs water principle as lithography. Using a fresh xereox photocopy (must be a fresh copy so chemicals are still active), heavily dampen the photocopy with water, then wipe on a solution of gum arabic & water (she just poured a tablespoon or so in a small bowl of water). Then brayer or roll on etching ink (which will adhere to the photocopy ink and be repelled by the blank water soaked areas of the paper). She laid the inked photocopy on a plexiglass plate with print paper on top and ran through the press. It produced a decent reverse print. Additionally she would immediately use the new print as a plate and run through the press again to get another ghost which would be back to the original orientation of the image.

Maybe this could be adapted to transfer to linoleum? It does get a bit messy. LOL

Dee

Forgot to add, this works best with line drawings than won't fill in too much.

inugie
08-03-2008, 11:35 AM
I have used laquer thinners on a photocopy to transfer to lino with very good results, but beware of the toxic fumes - you may end up too 'high' to do any cutting safely for a while.

Lately (and as I am pregnant) I've been copying/drawing the image on transfer paper with chinagraph (oilbased, glass writing) pencils of different colours, and than transfer this to the lino from the back with a 3H pencil. This works well although you do lose some detail if you have a complicated design because of all the repeated drawing.

Great for reduction prints as the pencil marks stay on the lino even after repeated cleaning, and you can use different colors as required.

Annamie

msue
08-03-2008, 11:44 AM
Since acetone was brought up again, just a quick reminder that if you don't have an art supply store or hardware store near; but have a drug or grocery store handy look for acetone based fingernail polish remover. You'll be able to get a small quantity to test the transfer process.

mlogusz
08-03-2008, 03:08 PM
Transfering Photocopy to Linoleum Block
Prepare image on computer.
You may want to consider bumping up the contrast and brightness of the image now. Also converting image to greyscale may help too.
Print it out backwards using 'mirror image' or 'reverse print' or 'flip horizontal' under advanced settings. If your printer doesn't have these settings then in your Photo-program (like PhotoShop) click image / flip horizontal before printing so your image/text is backwards on screen (and thus on your printout and photocopy).
Depending on your type of printer ink/toner sometimes transfers won't work so make a photocopy on a real photocopier.
Place photocopy face-down onto block.
Moisten back with ACETONE.
Let dry (will dry in mere seconds).
Peel back.It must be Acetone (not mineral spirits, laquers, rubbing alcohol, lamp oil, paint thinner, etc.--I forgot which to use and tried them all until I opened the acetone). Acetone may be purchased for about $20/gallon in a hardware store, but cheaper and smaller containers are available at art suppliers. A gallon would probably last a life-time.

Depending on your computer printer you might need an actual photocopy first. Ink-jet based printers don't seem to work, you'll need a toner based printer (or just photocopy your backward printout). Also be careful, you'll want to use a toner-based photocopier as well (a 'real' photocopier, not just an ink-based printer/scanner/fax machine some places have...though if it's toner based those should work too). Some people's 'laserjet' printers will transfer as well. Liquid Ink cartridges=bad, Expensive Dusty Toner carts=good.

The paper may 'stick' to the linoleum block, so if the image permits you may want to dog-ear a corner or have a knife around to help peel it up. Remember, if you don't like how it transfer (crooked, etc.) just wipe the block clean with more acetone and try again.

Also: If you have nail polish remover around, check the ingredients--it may be mostly acetone.

Someone posted a YouTube video of the process, just search for 'acetone transfer'.

Cheers,
mlogusz
One little change: I was thinking of a different process...so you do NOT want a mirror/reversed printout or photocopy. The photocopy should be normal, when it transfers to the linoleum block it will be reversed...then when you print the block it will print properly. Guess I was a bit loopy on acetone fumes :)

sumabokemo
08-03-2008, 05:35 PM
Have you tried paper plate lithography? I just was experimenting with it and I think it's going to work, but I'm having a problem with my little home laser printer--the toner lifts off when I ink it up. The way I've approached it is to put a very thin layer of gesso on the lino plate to give it a little grip and then printed my laser photo onto the paper. In the areas of my image that took (that hadn't lifted off) it looks great.
I was thinking that after cutting the plate, I would remove the gesso with a little alchohol and/or sandpaper. What do you think?

charlesgmorgan
08-04-2008, 11:08 AM
Xylene and lacquer thinner are both extremely toxic ... just go on-line and check the msds information for xylene and lacquer thinner. Part of the problem is that every manufacturer of lacquer thinner uses a slightly different mixture of mostly toxic stuff ... all very bad for you.

Acetone works very well ... available in most paint stores. It is much, much less toxic than the xylene or lacquer thinner. It is not carcinogenic, nor is it a neuro-toxin. It is highly volatile and flammable, so take the usual precautions. Put your xerox or laser print face down on the surface you want to transfer to ... use a cotton ball soaked in acetone, and rub the back of the paper. Let it sit for a minute and take the paper away.

Citrus based cleaners ... based on d-limonene ... also work with many xerox and laser printers. I used to use it for all my transfers. But my new laser printer uses a toner that the citrus based stuff does not touch. But I never found anything that acetone does not transfer. D-limonene is safer than most anything else you can use.

Work safely. Avoid skin exposure ... avoid inhalation ... be very careful with flammables.

Cheers ...... Charles

MezzoBug
08-04-2008, 11:11 PM
I also tried lazer tran, and used both methods. With no success.

How about just DIRECT printing to the plate...

So what I am going to try is something you can find on google by searching under "ink jet PCB direct printing".

It involves modyfing an ink jet printer to print directly onto a substrate up a to a few mm thinck.

The modifications involve:
Ensuring the 'paper' has a flat travel path.
Rejigging some of the sensors.
Raising the inkjet print head up so it does not contact and merely whizzes past spraying ink down as it goes.

For etching some brands of yellow ink can act as an acid resist when baked in the oven first. Amazing.

This would seem to offer some very exciting possibilities...

I could imagine scanning hand drawings into the computer and using the fill funtion in a drawing programme to create intricate masking out areas of solid ink for use in aquatinting.

And it should be possible to print out as a intaglio line etch mask or a more blocky aquatint mask, rosin in the normal way, etch, then clean the plate off, and put the plate through the modified printer for a second, perfectly aligned second masking out and do a second ....or third or 20th aquatint layer.

Or this lends itself to creating multi plate colour with perfect alignment.
I'll post to the group if I get printer the modifications done !


Search on google under CD direct printing as I think some people use the CD printing part of some printers to do this without having to modify their printers...

LetterC
08-10-2008, 11:05 PM
Honestly this is the method I use. Baby Wipes. Moisten the surface to be transfered ONTO with a Baby Wipe (Hand Wipe if you prefer). Lay the photocopy face down onto the moist surface and burnish the back of the photocopy. I lift the corner to check if it is transferring, while keeping it in place incase it isn't. It works for me. It's easy and I'm assuming it's non-toxic. :-)
Carol

deant
08-14-2008, 10:56 PM
For woodcuts, I use rice paste (1.5 Tbsp rice flour to 1 Cup of water and bring to a boil). I apply a layer of the paste to the block and then wet the paper and apply it (face up, so the image needs to be reversed) and then brush the paper down with more rice paste. Let it dry and then carve right through the paper. I believe that 19th century Japanese printmakers glued
the image down face down and then dampened the paper and carefully
rubbed most of it off, leaving a translucent layer with the image. Using
that technique, you would not reverse the image.

I have not tried this with lino.

Dean

Chloe_1
08-15-2008, 12:17 AM
I've printed my photo... Traced it on tracing paper.. Put face down on linoleum, then trace again with a pencil. Works well!
I like the idea of placing print down on linoleum..and using a sponge to wet it..then remove. I will try it out.
Thanks all:)

shedread
11-02-2008, 11:05 AM
Thank you for the tip, just what I was looking for!

shedread
11-02-2008, 11:07 AM
That was thanks to mlogusz, Cheers

Signchick
02-12-2009, 10:49 AM
Thanks so much for this thread!

I just used a copy from my laser printer, a little acetone based fingernail polish remover & then a little Pledge Orange Oil (for good luck). It transferred beautifully onto my linoleum!!! :clap:

Inky Fingers
02-12-2009, 04:50 PM
Most copiers that I have ever used at a copy shop have under their "special features" menu the ability to make the copy a mirror image of the original. I generally go to a Kinko's.

For copper plates, I take my orginal drawing and photocopy it onto film, the kind that you would use in an overhead projector. I enlarge it to whatever % of the original I want that suits the size of the plate. I then take the copy and tape it to foam core that has the center cut out to the size of the plate, generally leaving a 2-3 inch border. This is basically a jig. The copy is taped so that it can be folded back out of the way. Then with a grounded plate inserted in the center of the foam core, I take my scribe and poke small holes into the copy along the contours of the image so that the scribe makes a small mark on the grounded plate beneath. From these marks on the plate I draw/scribe my image into the ground before etching. This is the method Rembrandt used except he just put his paper drawing directly down on the plate and poked his holes through.

I have tried many different ways to transfer an image onto a grounded copper plate, with many, many failures. This is the best I have come up with so far, but I'm always looking for other solutions. It is a little tedious, but very accurate. Because it is on see through film it is easy to see if you are correctly aligned.

My $.02
Ken

GW137
05-27-2009, 09:09 PM
EURIKA..... is that spelled right?!? anyways lol ok i figured it out, i was trying to imprint an ink image on a guitar on white paint so i couldnt use any chemicals out of fear it would kill my clear coat after i got done putting laquer on so anyways i tried once to do it with just water and heat from an iron and yea..... lol it worked but was wayyyyyyy faded so i noticed that my print was darker then the transfer was by quite a bit as if it hadnt been phased so anyways i decide well the problem is 2 much ink is getting in the paper so being i had a can of spray on laquer i just took that and sprayed it on normal print paper and let it dry, pretty sure this wont hurt your printer?!? i dont know mines ok and ive done it like 20 times still prints nice. anyways the laquer makes the ink sit on top the paper and ive never let it dry like that so i wouldnt wait to put it on whatever your putting it on. set it up like a surgery get a spatula and a scissors out and obviously print it out backwards so it comes out right then just make sure the rooms lit enough to see through the paper upside down, line it up and set it down then take something (i used whatever i had with me lol a can of pop did the trick) and put it on one half of the pic while you take the tip of the spatula upside down and rub over the picture then move the can of pop or whatever lol and do that side. you dont even need tape or anything works just like one of those kids stick on tattoos. no water no heat nothing and it comes out perfectly clear if you do it right. ill post pics soon of mine if you dont believe me lol but yea the nice part is although i havent tried it yet i think you could do collors and whatever you want, i did black and white cause im doing a comic scheme on my guitar but enjoy!!! thank god i had a can of spray on laquer or i would have never figured it out lol just dumb luck and a "screw it lets wing it and see if it works" kind of thing, but to my knowledge its the clearest darkest most accurate and easiest way to transfer an image. one more tip make sure you have your printing options set up to do a high quality print rather then a fast print because that uses more ink!!!! but yea lol enjoy ;)

GW137
05-27-2009, 09:13 PM
:clap: one more thing! dont move the pic or it will smudge no doubt, i was doing one the other day with my music blasting and my aunt and uncle showed up to say high but i didnt hear them knock so they just walked in and i totally slid the spatula under the paper and wrecked my copy lol make sure it dries 100 percent before touching it, i give mine at least a day to make sure, a fan would work 2 im sure but hey have fun :thumbsup: later dudes (and chicks) ;)

GW137
05-27-2009, 09:14 PM
........ i spelled hi, high lol cant imagine what was on this now sober addicts mind lol anyways again laters :D

LetterC
05-27-2009, 11:54 PM
this is such a long thread and I probably have posted this before but... the easiest and safest way I've found to transfer photocopies to wood, lino or soft block is with hand wipes. Moisten the surface to be transfered ONTO with the hand wipe (or baby wipe). Put the photocopy face down on the dampened surface. Burnish the back of the copy. This has always worked for me. Good luck.
C.

azulparsnip
05-28-2009, 12:03 AM
These sound worth trying. Can you use any type of home/computer printed image....I mean ink jet &/or laser????
I've been doing the old stlye printer (using toner) at the library and then applying oops spot remover to back to bleed the image onto the linoleum. Works fine but would be good to have other methods handy.

Room410
05-28-2009, 08:13 AM
I tried the method that cerdo recommended with my students and the results are near perfect. i used Liquitex matt medium, brush the medium onto the wood moderately. put the photo copied image onto the wood face down, use a squeegy to flatten copy and pull out excess air or bubbles (dont pull too hard or you can rip the paper).

we then put it in front of a fan and let it dry(takes about 3-4 minutes)
then using a moistened sponge, slowly and methodically (in circular motions) wipe the the back of the paper until it begins to flake off. The idea is that you are taking the paper particles off a bit at a time (it flakes off in pieces) leaving the toner on the wood; if you press too hard you can take the toner up with the ink....if you take your time, 5-10 minutes, you can have a rich dark image on the wood in about 15 minutes. it is the best transfer method i have ever used!

i did try ironing a photo copy image onto the wood also, and it did work well enough, altho you did not get the rich darks in the image and in some places the image was but a ghost image.

*a helpful hint i found was to scan the students' drawings into photoshop, using the high contrast setting (which i am sure you can also do this in all versions of Word) make the drawing a very high contrast black and white. then i would print out that image (sizing it if necessary) and then bring that printed image to a photocopy machine to get an image suitable for transferring. I also made at least 2 copies on the photocopy machine so that if they did accidentally pull up some of the toner, they could use the second copy to iron on (patch up) the areas that did not transfer....altho if you do this carefully, there is little chance of the need for patch ups.

Doreen

GW137
05-29-2009, 12:07 PM
:clap: trust me my way worked best like i say ill post pics on my myspace or something like that like ummmm ill get it done today, my print on my guitar came out just as accurate and just as dark as it copied onto the paper, see the laquer holds the ink on top of the paper so it dont soak in meaning that less ink ends up in your paper and more ink ends up on whatever your transfering onto. and yes normal ink works i mean ive only tried my printer but it could be assumed with logic that virtually any ink will work so long as you have a thin layer of laquer over top the paper. i just layed mine outside in the sun and sprayed over top 1 side of each paper and let them dry, i think normal laquer would work 2 but i had spray on so that when i got done with my guitar i could spray over top of it and not risk ruining the transfers with a paintbrush and normal laquer. trust me!!! it works sooooooooooo flawlessly that when i saw how long this thread was i made a name just to post this message thats how excited i was to share the news!!!! this thread helped me figure out what did work and what didnt work so well and my transfers came out like a mirror image just as dark just as accurate as the copy, so detailed that if i dont tell people how i did it they cant figure it out lol i mean its wayyyyyy 2 detailed and accurate to be a stencil but also to draw it on by hand would take wayyyyyyyyyy 2 much talent lol. I was doing some very very detailed images try it out i swear its the best way to go and its so simple alls you need is a printer or a copier and some laquer. only takes however long it takes for the paper to dry and however long it takes your printer to print an image but again make sure your using maximum potential, change your printer settings to print in the highest quality. you will notice that the ink comes out in almost pixel like dots of ink which is good! because when you squish them down on whatever your transfering 2 they form a perfect image!!

for the validation of this post ill post pics tonight I promise! be back laters

GW137
05-29-2009, 04:46 PM
ok heres the pics of my transfer method i loved it personally and this was my second try i screwed up the first one of the girl so it got a little sloppy behind the pic, i only sanded it down enough so it didnt look horrible then i put a new one on top of it and no its not easy to screw it up i was just being massively stupid and got scared buy some people coming in my front door and i looked up for a split second and looked back down and i had put my spatula under the paper and smeared the wet ink!here they are http://viewmorepics.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=user.viewPicture&friendID=134487620&albumId=2121703 but hey i think it looks good i mean look at the copy of paper to see how well it transfered!!! and if linking to myspace isnt legal on these boards please give me a warning cause yea im new and am clueless about rules of these places i dont tend to visit these places often, rock on people and if you tried it let me know how it went cause i only have printer so its hard to say but i think it will work out with all printers equally :thumbsup: later dudes, and ;) ladys

Lillygirl
06-08-2009, 12:53 AM
Here is what works for me - Place fresh photocopy face down onto surface you want picture to go onto, Rub on universal thinners (very smelly) and then without moving photocopy, run the whole thing through the etching press. Gives a great result!

Diane Cutter
06-09-2009, 12:11 PM
Hi, Lillygirl... Could you let me know what you mean by universal thinners? Turpentine?

Diane

Lillygirl
06-09-2009, 11:41 PM
The stuff is called universal thinners and there are several 'numbers' but you use 'number 4' The quicker the process is done ie immediately after it is photocopied, wipe the stuff on and go for it. The thinners is available in hardware stores. The brand I use is 'International' made in Australia but it should be readily available anywhere. Hope this helps! Cheers

jerrydreesen
06-10-2009, 04:47 PM
Gosh, and I've been using tracing paper to detail all my images. I end up with thin lines and lots of tranfered smudges. I've got plenty of Cottonelle wipes, so I'll try that. Would it work, Letter C, do you think with soft rubber lino?

Dave S. Meister
09-05-2013, 08:48 AM
Hey, I came accross this page as i'm also trying to transfer a drawing onto linoleum without having to re-draw it 2 times.
I found out about this:
(oups not allowed to post urls yet...) the site is imcclains dot com / go to blocks and plates / and then Ink Jet transfer paper
it's a special transfer paper to print on from your inkjet and transfer directly onto linoleum. Didn't try it yet, but will probably soon, and will let you know. Maybe a good alternative to photocopy?

Diane Cutter
09-05-2013, 10:26 AM
it's a special transfer paper to print on from your inkjet and transfer directly onto linoleum. Didn't try it yet, but will probably soon, and will let you know. Maybe a good alternative to photocopy?
I've used this for woodblocks and it works like a dream but haven't tried it on lino.

Diane

Hopcroft
09-05-2013, 10:39 PM
You can make your own inkjet transfer paper using freezer paper from the grocery store. It works really well on linoleum and doesn't involve any nasty solvents. I wrote about the technique in this post (http://www.michaeljhopcroft.com/2013/02/13/a-better-way-to-transfer-drawings-to-linoleum/) on my blog (http://www.michaeljhopcroft.com).

ElizabethBristow
09-07-2013, 01:51 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTfp-Qgy8WY&feature=share&list=PLDC94E8E3CA517EA7 check out this video. this woman shows how to do it.