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sherrysherman
06-28-2012, 11:23 AM
Hi all--

Johannes has said that he will be working in WATERCOLOR, and that the ratio of the painting is 7:10; his will be 14"x20". Other correct sizes would be 7"x10" and 10.5 x 15".) He has posted the ref photo at the website referred to in his email; the drawing will probably be there today or tomorrow. If you signed up for the sessions, and registered at gotomeeting, you should be receiving his emails. Last week he sent two with the link - one on June 20 and one on June 21. It is the same site this week.

Here's what I suggest be in this thread:
- Comments and questions about the June 23 Paintalong, including medium, size, palette, surface prep, etc.
- J's final painting
- Students' paintings based on the June 23 paintalong
- Comments and critiques about the paintings that are posted.

Please DON'T POST general discussion relating to the paintalongs as a whole, including comments about ustream, technical glitches, suggestions for future paintalongs, dates and times, "where's the thread for XYZ?", how awesome Johannes is for doing these, etc - those should go in the Paint Along Discussion thread, here: http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/show....php?t=1114192
or in some other relevant thread.

EXCEPTION: Johannes can post anything he wants here.

Here's what NOT to post, here or anywhere: J's email or the link to get the photos, download the videos, etc, because those reveal the Secret Password. (Oh, and don't post the password.)

Johannes Instructor
06-28-2012, 01:40 PM
The reference drawing and picture is up for class 2 at the student access page. The ratio may have changed a bit to fit the paper about 1 inch. Now it is 2/3.

sherrysherman
06-28-2012, 02:01 PM
The reference drawing and picture is up for class 2 at the student access page. The ratio may have changed a bit to fit the paper about 1 inch. Now it is 2/3.
For those feeling a little math-challenged, here are some possible dimensions for the 2:3 ratio:
6" x 9"
8" x 12"
10" x 15"
12" x 18"
14" x 21" (I believe this is the actual size Joe will be using)
16" x 24"

chalet_dor
06-29-2012, 02:49 AM
For those feeling a little math-challenged, here are some possible dimensions for the 2:3 ratio:
6" x 9"
8" x 12"
10" x 15"
12" x 18"
14" x 21" (I believe this is the actual size Joe will be using)
16" x 24"

Dear Sherry
I have fiddled and worried with this all day and night! Thank you so much for these dimensions. Now I can go to bed after I copy, paste and save.......:heart: dor:))

distantriver
06-29-2012, 11:04 AM
Is this paintalong to be a two color watercolor?

paintncook
06-29-2012, 11:31 AM
Dear Sherry
I have fiddled and worried with this all day and night! Thank you so much for these dimensions. Now I can go to bed after I copy, paste and save.......:heart: dor:))
Dor and all other math challenged: No need to fret and worry about this. It is a simple algebra problem. Here is how it's done:
Example: You are given a 2 to 3 ratio and you want to use a canvas that has a dimension of 10 inches on one side, but need to know what the other side should be. 2 is to 3 as 10 is to what? Call 'what' X and your formula is 2/3=10/X. Continuing to solve this, you multiply 3 by 10 and it will equal X multiplied by 2, or 3 times 10 = 2 times X. Continuing to solve, it is 30 equals 2X. To find out what X is you need to get X on one side of the equation and the known numbers on the other. 2X equals 30 is the same as saying X equals 30 divided by 2. Dividing 30 by 2 you have 15 equals X. So now it is solved. If you have a canvas that is 10 inches on one side, you need the other side to be 15 for a ration of 2:3. Of course, given any ratio, you simply plug in the numbers into that algebra equation. All you need to know is what you want for one side of your canvas and you can find out what the other side needs to be. I hope this helps so nobody else looses sleep over it, lol. Kathy

Improv
06-29-2012, 12:38 PM
Dor and all other math challenged: No need to fret and worry about this. It is a simple algebra problem. Here is how it's done:
Example: You are given a 2 to 3 ratio and you want to use a canvas that has a dimension of 10 inches on one side, but need to know what the other side should be. 2 is to 3 as 10 is to what? Call 'what' X and your formula is 2/3=10/X. Continuing to solve this, you multiply 3 by 10 and it will equal X multiplied by 2, or 3 times 10 = 2 times X. Continuing to solve, it is 30 equals 2X. To find out what X is you need to get X on one side of the equation and the known numbers on the other. 2X equals 30 is the same as saying X equals 30 divided by 2. Dividing 30 by 2 you have 15 equals X. So now it is solved. If you have a canvas that is 10 inches on one side, you need the other side to be 15 for a ration of 2:3. Of course, given any ratio, you simply plug in the numbers into that algebra equation. All you need to know is what you want for one side of your canvas and you can find out what the other side needs to be. I hope this helps so nobody else looses sleep over it, lol. Kathy


You call that simple? :eek:

I didn't understand any of it-my eyes glazed over and I went into a trance! :lol:

Improv
06-29-2012, 12:57 PM
Duplicate post.

chalet_dor
06-29-2012, 02:53 PM
Dor and all other math challenged: No need to fret and worry about this. It is a simple algebra problem. Here is how it's done:
Example: You are given a 2 to 3 ratio and you want to use a canvas that has a dimension of 10 inches on one side, but need to know what the other side should be. 2 is to 3 as 10 is to what? Call 'what' X and your formula is 2/3=10/X. Continuing to solve this, you multiply 3 by 10 and it will equal X multiplied by 2, or 3 times 10 = 2 times X. Continuing to solve, it is 30 equals 2X. To find out what X is you need to get X on one side of the equation and the known numbers on the other. 2X equals 30 is the same as saying X equals 30 divided by 2. Dividing 30 by 2 you have 15 equals X. So now it is solved. If you have a canvas that is 10 inches on one side, you need the other side to be 15 for a ration of 2:3. Of course, given any ratio, you simply plug in the numbers into that algebra equation. All you need to know is what you want for one side of your canvas and you can find out what the other side needs to be. I hope this helps so nobody else looses sleep over it, lol. Kathy

Hi Kathy
You are much better than Google! I am going to copy and paste and save this under Art-measurments..........where I also have saved Sherry's info. Thank you so much.............smiles to you:) dor

Amandine
06-29-2012, 02:56 PM
After looking at your drawing for June 30th paint along Jo, I find it very detailed. It's more than just a sketch. Is it so detailed because the demo is in watercolor ? Would you do a simpler sketch if you would paint in oil ? May 27th (pastel) was more kind of a sketch but June 3rd (wc) was also detailed. Does the medium influence the drawing you do ? :confused:

paintncook
06-29-2012, 03:02 PM
You call that simple? :eek:

I didn't understand any of it-my eyes glazed over and I went into a trance! :lol:
What?!?! I tried to explain it step by step so you couldn't miss. Maybe I explained it TOO much.
Ratio: 2:3
One side of canvas: 10 inches
Problem: How do I figure out how many inches for other side keeping a 2:3 ratio?
2/3 (two thirds) equals 10/X (X is the unknown quantity) (2 is to 3 as 10 is to what or X)
The above is a simple algebra problem: 2/3=10/X
Solve for X. X is the measurement of the other side of the canvas where 10 inches is the known side.
To solve for X you multiply the denominator of the fractions on one side of the equation by the numerators of the fractions on the other side of the equation. 2 is the numerator of one side and X is the denominator of the other side. 3 is the denominator of one side and 10 is the numerator on the other side.
By doing the above you get 30=2X (3 times 10 equals 2 times X)
To solve for X you get the 2 on the other side of the equation. 30 divided by 2 equals X. (Anything muliplied by a number on one side is always equal to what is on the other side divided by that number)
30 divided by two is 15. Therefore X equals 15 and that is the measurement for the other side of the canvas if the one side is 10 to keep a 2:3 (2/3) ratio. Is that any clearer?

The problem is that you can't just read the explanation without thinking about it at the same time. I sure hope my second explanation is more clear. Just remember your first year algebra class and then you've got it!!
Kathy

sherrysherman
06-29-2012, 03:35 PM
...
Just remember your first year algebra class and then you've got it!!
Kathy
LOL! Do you know how many people - and probably especially artist-types - did not retain first-year algebra beyond the final exam (or not even that long)? And how many artists have spent decades trying to FORGET that year?

But it is awfully nice of you to give it a shot. :)

(Here's another way of saying it (thanks, Doug): For every 2" on the short side, you need 3" on the long side. If it's a 3:4 ratio, then for every 3" on the short side, you need 4" on the long side.)

Basically, whether it's a list of dimensions, using algebra, or asking a friend, whatever works for you is fine. For me, I tend to like "standard" sizes because they're cheaper to frame. :wink2:

Johannes Instructor
06-29-2012, 03:47 PM
What?!?! I tried to explain it step by step so you couldn't miss. Maybe I explained it TOO much.
Ratio: 2:3
One side of canvas: 10 inches
Problem: How do I figure out how many inches for other side keeping a 2:3 ratio?
2/3 (two thirds) equals 10/X (X is the unknown quantity) (2 is to 3 as 10 is to what or X)
The above is a simple algebra problem: 2/3=10/X
Solve for X. X is the measurement of the other side of the canvas where 10 inches is the known side.
To solve for X you multiply the denominator of the fractions on one side of the equation by the numerators of the fractions on the other side of the equation. 2 is the numerator of one side and X is the denominator of the other side. 3 is the denominator of one side and 10 is the numerator on the other side.
By doing the above you get 30=2X (3 times 10 equals 2 times X)
To solve for X you get the 2 on the other side of the equation. 30 divided by 2 equals X. (Anything muliplied by a number on one side is always equal to what is on the other side divided by that number)
30 divided by two is 15. Therefore X equals 15 and that is the measurement for the other side of the canvas if the one side is 10 to keep a 2:3 (2/3) ratio. Is that any clearer?

The problem is that you can't just read the explanation without thinking about it at the same time. I sure hope my second explanation is more clear. Just remember your first year algebra class and then you've got it!!
Kathy
If the USA used the metric system like so many other countries all this would be easier to figure out. You could just divide any metric width into 3 then multiply by 2 to get the height. With inches it is more complex unless they are exact inches..

sherrysherman
06-29-2012, 04:13 PM
If the USA used the metric system like so many other countries all this would be easier to figure out. You could just divide any metric width into 3 then multiply by 2 to get the height. With inches it is more complex unless they are exact inches..

So long as they are exact inches, it would be the same. Divide the long side by 3; multiply that number by 2 to get the short side.
OR divide the short side by 2; multiply that number by 3 for the long side.

If it is 3:4 ratio, divide the long side by 4. Multiply that number by 3 to get the short side. OR divide the short side by 3; multiply that number by 4 to get the long side.

Use a calculator. And stick with exact inches. Who needs a painting that is 7 1/4 inches on a side?

Improv
06-29-2012, 05:33 PM
Who needs a painting that is 7 1/4 inches on a side?

I have a table saw if that helps!!! :thumbsup::lol::lol:

Cheers

Doug (Ever the Helpful One!)

paintncook
06-29-2012, 05:41 PM
I have a table saw if that helps!!! :thumbsup::lol::lol:

Cheers

Doug (Ever the Helpful One!)
As for me, I don't really try to duplicate Johannes' ratio to the letter (or is it to the number?). I just use what I have and go from there, maybe elongating something here and there in the drawing to make it fit.
You are right about standard sizes, otherwise, nonstandard costs more to get framed.
Kathy

chalet_dor
06-29-2012, 06:26 PM
LOL! Do you know how many people - and probably especially artist-types - did not retain first-year algebra beyond the final exam (or not even that long)? And how many artists have spent decades trying to FORGET that year?

For me, I tend to like "standard" sizes because they're cheaper to frame. :wink2:

Yes they sure are. So that means I will never buy a painting again unless it needs no frame, is already framed or a standard size. dor:)):thumbsup:

Shadow_2010
06-29-2012, 06:50 PM
I'm getting a headache from all this math:D But I love all the different explanations. Has Jo told us yet what watercolor paper weight he will use?:confused:
Sherry thanks for keeping all these threads separate, you're terrific. Peggysue1971 Moab, UT

Sgourlayart
06-29-2012, 10:26 PM
Yes they sure are. So that means I will never buy a painting again unless it needs no frame, is already framed or a standard size. dor:)):thumbsup:Dors, I hate to tell you this, but ratios and short division are taught in grade school and there is no algebra involved. You need to have the grandkids come over; you help them with painting, and they help you with math. I'm like Kathy and Doug; I paint on what I've got and since I also have a table saw, I cut it down or I just make my own frame. Dors, I want to make sure you are not breathing in the vapors from all that roasted walnut oil; you're not are you? Just kidding, Stu.

paintncook
06-29-2012, 11:23 PM
Dors, I hate to tell you this, but ratios and short division are taught in grade school and there is no algebra involved. You need to have the grandkids come over; you help them with painting, and they help you with math. I'm like Kathy and Doug; I paint on what I've got and since I also have a table saw, I cut it down or I just make my own frame. Dors, I want to make sure you are not breathing in the vapors from all that roasted walnut oil; you're not are you? Just kidding, Stu.
Haha, leave it to me to make a ratio problem into an algebra problem with X as the unknown. It really is a simple thing, but my explanation of it made it sound complicated. I was just trying to show that it really was easy to figure out once you had the size of one side in mind and knew the ratio involved.
Personally, I don't think the size you work on needs to be an absolute and I adjust the drawing to fit the size. As long as it isn't dramatically off from what Johannes is using, it works. Kathy

Shadow_2010
06-30-2012, 12:32 AM
:clap: OK one last math question...when someone says they will be using an 18x24 or 5x6 etc is it the first or second number that is a side? how do you tell if it is portrait or landscape orientation? Will Jo's painting be taller rather than wider? or will it be...you get the idea right???:confused:

I got an email from Jo, on the watercolor weight he is using 140lb paper.
see you tomorrow!
peggysue1971

Sgourlayart
06-30-2012, 12:47 AM
:clap: OK one last math question...when someone says they will be using an 18x24 or 5x6 etc is it the first or second number that is a side? how do you tell if it is portrait or landscape orientation? Will Jo's painting be taller rather than wider? or will it be...you get the idea right???:confused:

I got an email from Jo, on the watercolor weight he is using 140lb paper.
see you tomorrow!
peggysue1971Not really a math question at all. Standard for photography, art and computer printers is HEIGHT:WIDTH, so 18 by 24 is 18" is height and 24" is width or "landscape format" 3:4 ratio. 24" by 18" would be 24" high by 18" wide or "portrait format" or 4:3 ratio.
So, the answer to you question is that Jo's painting will be wider that tall or in landscape format. Your other clue is the posted sketch; it is wider than tall. So you can even get your sketch in before the class. Stu

Sgourlayart
06-30-2012, 01:01 AM
Haha, leave it to me to make a ratio problem into an algebra problem with X as the unknown. It really is a simple thing, but my explanation of it made it sound complicated. I was just trying to show that it really was easy to figure out once you had the size of one side in mind and knew the ratio involved.
Personally, I don't think the size you work on needs to be an absolute and I adjust the drawing to fit the size. As long as it isn't dramatically off from what Johannes is using, it works. KathySorry Kathy, I thought that was Dors, not you with the equations (kind of typical for a scientist). Sherry is the one with the best solution, she just posted all the sizes for the ratio. I get a little hung up myself with 11" by 14" because you can't divide 11 by anything evenly, so I just fudge it and call it a 3:4 ratio, just like 9" by 12" or 12" by 16". Also, I sometimes just crop off my photo reference by using a calculator to adjust the final photo to the ratio I want for my canvas; I never had a calculator in high school or college (because they hadn't been invented yet), but I had slide rules. So, who needs math for art anyway? Just fudge a little and use your artistic license. Stu

paintncook
06-30-2012, 08:25 AM
Sorry Kathy, I thought that was Dors, not you with the equations (kind of typical for a scientist). Sherry is the one with the best solution, she just posted all the sizes for the ratio. I get a little hung up myself with 11" by 14" because you can't divide 11 by anything evenly, so I just fudge it and call it a 3:4 ratio, just like 9" by 12" or 12" by 16". Also, I sometimes just crop off my photo reference by using a calculator to adjust the final photo to the ratio I want for my canvas; I never had a calculator in high school or college (because they hadn't been invented yet), but I had slide rules. So, who needs math for art anyway? Just fudge a little and use your artistic license. Stu
I see we are from the same era. I didn't have calculators - not until grad school anyway - and used the trusty slide rule also. kathy

Amandine
06-30-2012, 09:07 AM
Looks like you've skipped my question Jo. So here it is again. Please ...
After looking at your drawing for June 30th paint along Jo, I find it very detailed. It's more than just a sketch. Is it so detailed because the demo is in watercolor ? Would you do a simpler sketch if you would paint in oil ? May 27th (pastel) was more kind of a sketch but June 3rd (wc) was also detailed. Does the medium influence the drawing you do ? :confused:
Easier to answer than all this algebra debate :lol:

EdDyerFineArt
06-30-2012, 05:37 PM
Why would anyone want to figure out canvas sizes with algebraic ratios is a waste of time/effort. Have you had a non-standard(customed) painting framed by a framer latelly? You'll spend many times more for then framing with standard sizes. A Renaissance man I'm not.

Improv
06-30-2012, 07:18 PM
Why would anyone want to figure out canvas sizes with algebraic ratios is a waste of time/effort. Have you had a non-standard(customed) painting framed by a framer latelly? You'll spend many times more for then framing with standard sizes. A Renaissance man I'm not.
Well said, Ed. And welcome to Wet Canvas! :)

For those not familiar with Ed's work, here's a link to his web site:

http://eddyerartist.com/

Pinklady219
06-30-2012, 08:36 PM
Here is my paint-along with Joe. Once I took a picture of it, I see that my wheel doesn't look round (it is though). The shadow might need darkening. I really loved this class. Please critique Joe. Thank you big time!! Carol

paintncook
06-30-2012, 10:04 PM
Why would anyone want to figure out canvas sizes with algebraic ratios is a waste of time/effort. Have you had a non-standard(customed) painting framed by a framer latelly? You'll spend many times more for then framing with standard sizes. A Renaissance man I'm not.
Although I was the one explaining how to figure these things out, I would never bother with it. I use standard sizes, although I know a framer who will custom frame for a very reasonable price. My dad made frames for my mother ages ago. She stretched her own canvas, but, since my dad made the frames, sizes were of no concern for her. I don't believe in overthinking these things, just go with a standard size. I worry more about whether to use landscape or portrait format. Kathy

hewill4giveu
06-30-2012, 10:32 PM
Thats funny i posted the first version and it disappeared oh well. Here is the revised version. As i said on the first post for me to finish a whole painting in one day is a miracle in itself. I usually take three or four days. Why im so behind. So im happy love these type classes.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jun-2012/184319-redo-on-my-painting-003.jpg

Banner
07-01-2012, 04:27 AM
Thats a real cool painting well done:wave:

Sgourlayart
07-01-2012, 06:16 AM
Although I was the one explaining how to figure these things out, I would never bother with it. I use standard sizes, although I know a framer who will custom frame for a very reasonable price. My dad made frames for my mother ages ago. She stretched her own canvas, but, since my dad made the frames, sizes were of no concern for her. I don't believe in overthinking these things, just go with a standard size. I worry more about whether to use landscape or portrait format. Kathy
Me too Kathy, but just as I like to "waste my time" painting, I kind of like to waste it making frames, paint boxes, etc. as well. So although I usually use standard formats, it doesn't bother me at all to use odd sizes; just another challenge. I also try not to waste too much time thinking about all this. Since I usually paint in oils on homemade panels, I can just use my table saw for cropping the painting; super simple solution. And, since like Kathy, I had late exposure to calculators and computers, I just use "head math" or a pencil and paper to figure out most of this-- most important principle is "Measure TWICE and cut once!". Stu

LADickerman
07-01-2012, 08:58 AM
Here is my paintalong with Jo from yesterday. I really feel I have improved so much in the past several months. In Jan, I could not paint a landscape and have it look even halfway decent. Then I started taking classes with Jo. THANK YOU SO MUCH JO. I'm learning so much. Still have a long ways to go but at least I feel like now I can show someone my painting rather than toss it in a drawer. Jo, I took your waterfall class but I need to buy it now because I struggled with that and finally gave up and took it out. I will get that course but I'm playing catch up with the buildings and trees classes.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jul-2012/188330-Water_Wheel_Mill.jpg
I already see so many things I should fix. C&C are welcome.
Lori Anne

Johannes Instructor
07-01-2012, 10:40 AM
Why would anyone want to figure out canvas sizes with algebraic ratios is a waste of time/effort. Have you had a non-standard(customed) painting framed by a framer latelly? You'll spend many times more for then framing with standard sizes. A Renaissance man I'm not.
First goes the composition and canvas size is subordinate to that. Even if it means not getting a stereo typed size. At least for me. 2/3 is not an unusual size.

Johannes Instructor
07-01-2012, 01:31 PM
Here's the June 30 Paint Along.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jul-2012/135220-FinishedPainting.jpg

carneireiro
07-01-2012, 02:01 PM
Grate lesson of yesterday
Following Johannes I was able to paint that beautiful landscape using U.Blue and Burnt Sienna only ( a litle bit of pastels to finish ).

CAN WE DO THE SAME USING OTHER PAIRS OF COLORS ( HUES ) ?

Thanks Johannes

carneireiro
07-01-2012, 02:02 PM
Hi Johannes,
Thanks one more time for the grate lesson of yesterday.

This is my 1st. time submitting you a paint for critic. So, I hope the photo will show it in a way that you can see it properly.

I should use a ruler or piece a paper ( as you show us yesterday ), to align the windows. I didn't, and just now I'm seeing this error.

Best regards
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jul-2012/214241-30.06.012_b.JPG

Johannes Instructor
07-01-2012, 02:18 PM
Grate lesson of yesterday
Following Johannes I was able to paint that beautiful landscape using U.Blue and Burnt Sienna only ( a litle bit of pastels to finish ).

CAN WE DO THE SAME USING OTHER PAIRS OF COLORS ( HUES ) ?

Thanks Johannes
You can try a triad orange, purple and green.

mickisew
07-01-2012, 03:17 PM
Hi Johannes: Thank you for posting your photo so quickly. These classes are terrific. Unfortunately, I toned my canvas (used oils yesterday), but I like a challenge. LOL I also appreciate viewing your students paintings. It shows they don't follow you exactly - a good lesson for all. It is like the photo course. I am quite pleased with my painting yesterday - even though it still needs some work. Unfortunately, I spent my day sanding and mid-tone painting new hardwood for my H-Frame. Oh well - I asked DH to get the hardwood to my specification, so I had to do the work. LOL Thanks again, and again, and again for all you do for us. Micki

Amandine
07-01-2012, 03:57 PM
3rd try to get an answer ... ... :wink2:
Looks like you've skipped my question Jo. So here it is again. Please ...
After looking at your drawing for June 30th paint along Jo, I find it very detailed. It's more than just a sketch. Is it so detailed because the demo is in watercolor ? Would you do a simpler sketch if you would paint in oil ? May 27th (pastel) was more kind of a sketch but June 3rd (wc) was also detailed. Does the medium influence the drawing you do ? :confused:
Easier to answer than all this algebra debate :lol:
Jo, please ...

Johannes Instructor
07-02-2012, 01:25 AM
3rd try to get an answer ... ... :wink2:

Jo, please ...
I would definitely do a more simple drawing for oils. The issue is that for watercolor it is too risky to have an ambigous drawing. With oils worse case scenario, I wipe an area off or even wash the whole canves under hot water and dishwasher soap and start over.

Amandine
07-02-2012, 07:34 AM
I would definitely do a more simple drawing for oils. The issue is that for watercolor it is too risky to have an ambigous drawing. With oils worse case scenario, I wipe an area off or even wash the whole canves under hot water and dishwasher soap and start over.
Thanks Jo. So it was not just an illusion thinking your drawing was more detailed ... How do you manage to come up with such a precise drawing ?

Is it safe to wash a canvas under hot water if it's been glued to a panel ? Won't the canvas come off ? Won't it cause any damage to the panel ?

Johannes Instructor
07-02-2012, 12:53 PM
Thanks Jo. So it was not just an illusion thinking your drawing was more detailed ... How do you manage to come up with such a precise drawing ?

Is it safe to wash a canvas under hot water if it's been glued to a panel ? Won't the canvas come off ? Won't it cause any damage to the panel ?

If your canvas is glued, in that case you don't use water that is too hot. Maybe just enough so you don't burn your hands. The reason for the hot water is to help melt the linseed oil. If your subject is very complicated you may consider LCD projecting and lightly do the pencil marks. Then erase some of the lines whose shapes are not working an redraw the shapes into better ones. But when it comes to man made objects such as boats and buildings you can project the image or print out the photo and use graphite paper to trace it. Just take into account that when required redesign shapes into better ones but if the shapes in the photo is working well then keeps those from your LCD projection or graphite paper tracing. There is no sense getting tired in the drawing stage when after you are done you lose interest to paint it because you struggled with the drawing. Another way is to grid your canvas into small squares and then draw the things you need by working in one square at a time. This is call the grid method and goes back hundreds of years.

Amandine
07-02-2012, 02:53 PM
If your canvas is glued, in that case you don't use water that is too hot. Maybe ... ... ... by working in one square at a time. This is call the grid method and goes back hundreds of years.
Thank you very much for all this information Johannes.

totsy
07-02-2012, 05:17 PM
Teresa, your painting is smoking!

I can't wait to see the video.

linnette

gourdalicious
07-02-2012, 10:26 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Jul-2012/990382-IMG_3947.JPG

Getting closer to finishing each class. Had issues with the ultramarine blue staining, trying to wash out my first attempt and doing a number on the paper, then trying to follow what was left of my drawing. YEP! had a great time! Thanks Jo for the challenge. Looking forward to this Saturday!

sewnsew43
07-03-2012, 09:50 AM
Johannes, Where is your finished image? I had to miss the end of the class.

Rosemarie
07-03-2012, 09:53 AM
Post #35 in this thread!

jeanetteg
07-03-2012, 02:13 PM
Looks like I missed a wonderful paintalong. Looking forward to the download. Have a happy 4th everyone. Jeanette

Pinklady219
07-03-2012, 02:48 PM
I corrected some perspective in my painting. Thank you to all for your feedback. Thank you Joe for your paint along sessions. I believe this is the first of my paintings that I can't stop admiring. That means everything to me after all these years!

mickisew
07-03-2012, 05:21 PM
Downloaded the videos - looks good. Thank you, Johannes. Micki

jeanetteg
07-03-2012, 07:11 PM
Just finished downloading videos. They look great. Thanks Jeanette

Johannes Instructor
07-03-2012, 07:50 PM
Downloaded the videos - looks good. Thank you, Johannes. Micki
DVD QUALITY

pjbenson
07-03-2012, 09:16 PM
hewillforgiveu...beautiful job on this painting!

painterted
07-04-2012, 02:56 PM
I missed the class Sat. Joe, I took a couple of days off. This was a fun one to paint, made me do quite a bit of thinking. Still made lots of mistakes, several in the proportions, and the snow is to dirty.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Jul-2012/909312-P1010003.jpg

Pinklady219
07-06-2012, 01:21 AM
I found this pic of the same waterwheel of June 30 but from a different angle. I'm going to attempt to do it for a spring scene. I thought this was interesting to see it at a different angle.

Mustbenuts
07-06-2012, 04:42 PM
Happy to report that I actually finished one in under 3 weeks! :angel: This was such an interesting exercise, using only two colors plus white gave much more variety than I expected.

Acrylic 12 X 15

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jul-2012/107653-WinterMill.jpg

See everyone tomorrow.

LADickerman
07-07-2012, 09:32 AM
PinkLady...do you know where this place is? I have a friend who is convinced it is in Colorado.

Johannes Instructor
07-07-2012, 11:16 AM
PinkLady...do you know where this place is? I have a friend who is convinced it is in Colorado.
Virginia

nougat
07-07-2012, 12:24 PM
is anyone having a problem downloading the videos?

part 2 downloaded - no problem but parts 1 & 3 don't.
they either appear as a smaller file or do not appear at all.
at the mo i'm trying for the 4th time.

Rosemarie
07-07-2012, 12:29 PM
No, nougat! I din't have any problem with those videos. They are big and took h-k of a time to download so try downloading when the americans and malteses sleep. I find that it goes best early in the european morning!

chalet_dor
07-07-2012, 04:29 PM
is anyone having a problem downloading the videos?

part 2 downloaded - no problem but parts 1 & 3 don't.
they either appear as a smaller file or do not appear at all.
at the mo i'm trying for the 4th time.

No problems at all...........:)) Guess I am lucky........

paintncook
07-07-2012, 06:29 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jul-2012/1027192-IMG_1750.JPG
I had to wait for the video download to do my paintalong. Watercolor on CP 140 lb paper. Kathy

nougat
07-08-2012, 12:14 AM
thanks rosemarie - that is indeed when i download...early morning :)
part 3 downloaded on the 4th attempt and fingers crossed that part 1 will download THIS time on the 5th go!!! :)

chalet_dor
07-08-2012, 12:28 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jul-2012/1027192-IMG_1750.JPG
I had to wait for the video download to do my paintalong. Watercolor on CP 140 lb paper. Kathy

So glad you posted your beautiful Watercolor Kathy......Well done! : ))

:thumbsup:

Rosemarie
07-08-2012, 02:01 AM
:thumbsup: That is a fresh watecolour! Well done.

paintncook
07-08-2012, 08:36 AM
Thanks Rosemarie and Dor. I wish Jo would critique our paintalongs like he does our other paintings, but I guess he has a lot on his plate, lol.
Kathy

LynnM
07-10-2012, 04:08 PM
Some nice fresh watercolours here for sure, nice to see other takes on this image!

Here's mine. Arches 140 lb CP, 10x14 in., da Vinci ultramarine (red), burnt sienna, and a little WN indian red. I found the da Vinci paints had a bit of a different cast than the WN I am used to, and the photo has a bit of a blue cast.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Jul-2012/97813-Mill_my_painting_001_Medium_Web_view.jpg

Thanks for looking!

chalet_dor
07-10-2012, 04:52 PM
Thanks Rosemarie and Dor. I wish Jo would critique our paintalongs like he does our other paintings, but I guess he has a lot on his plate, lol.
Kathy

I wish that also Kathy because I enjoy seeing his comments, but I also know that what I want is for affirmation that he noticed. LOL smiles dor:))

“Creativity is contagious. Pass it on.” — Albert Einstein

painteriam
07-11-2012, 01:33 PM
This is my first oil in about 20 years and I am really enjoying getting back to it after exploring acrylics and watercolor.http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/11-Jul-2012/139791-IMG_7542.JPG

Johannes Instructor
07-11-2012, 04:35 PM
I wish that also Kathy because I enjoy seeing his comments, but I also know that what I want is for affirmation that he noticed. LOL smiles dor:))

“Creativity is contagious. Pass it on.” — Albert Einstein





Dor, Yes I see all submissions and posts. I really think that the idea of the paint alongs is to absorb the principles I have been teaching. Students should ne able to point out the problematic areas when making the comparisons between their painting and mine. This way they will focus more on what is different and learn from it.

sherrysherman
07-11-2012, 06:29 PM
Dor, Yes I see all submissions and posts. I really think that the idea of the paint alongs is to absorb the principles I have been teaching. Students should ne able to point out the problematic areas when making the comparisons between their painting and mine. This way they will focus more on what is different and learn from it.
I agree with you, Joe (even though I suspect that I would also enjoy your feedback, especially on my own). I downloaded your final painting and have spent time comparing it with some of the students' work posted here. Then I try to figure out where yours is different, and why it works. For instance, yesterday I compared Kathy's with yours, side by side, and could see some significant differences that I might not have been so aware of if you had simply commented. So I think that even without your feedback, it's very helpful to see others' paintings.

spudsmom
07-12-2012, 05:00 PM
I agree Sherry, it is helpful to compare Jo's with our own painting and to look at others'. I learn from looking at other paintings. As to whether or not I can get my brush and paints to do what I want them to do ...well that's another story. Just keep trying....

Jo,

I love this painting! I was in South Carolina the last two weeks and didn't get to watch. Last night I spent an hour with the download..just watching you do the background. I learned an incredible amount! Loved the paper towel trick to dab up some paint which resulted in a lighter colored bush near the Mill. I can't wait to paint this one!

I think my dad painted this exact picture in oils a long time ago. I believe it is hanging in my mom's house... We will see if I can top his ;-)

Sherri

xli
07-14-2012, 12:44 PM
My first water color! This painting of Jo's is so beautiful. I have to try it with the right medium, so I bought water color painting staff and tried it. The most difficult thing I think, compared with oil painting, is that you have to constantly thinking leaving the white space for high lights. This is really a lot of fun. Thank you Jo for introducing me to water color. I think I am going to practice it more.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Jul-2012/979242-IMG_5710.JPG

sherrysherman
07-14-2012, 09:06 PM
My first water color! This painting of Jo's is so beautiful. I have to try it with the right medium, so I bought water color painting staff and tried it. The most difficult thing I think, compared with oil painting, is that you have to constantly thinking leaving the white space for high lights. This is really a lot of fun. Thank you Jo for introducing me to water color. I think I am going to practice it more.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Jul-2012/979242-IMG_5710.JPG

Nice job, xii. Hard to believe it's your first watercolor! :clap:

Tonalist
07-14-2012, 09:12 PM
Nice job, xii. Hard to believe it's your first watercolor! :clap:

I agree.. very nice!
woody

xli
07-15-2012, 02:44 AM
Thank you Sherry and Woody for the nice comments. Actually, I did a lot of things wrong during the process. First, I wet the paper and put it on a board, but I used my hand to try to smooth the air babbles underneath the paper and end up lifted off the top layer of the paper. Then, when the paper dry, it buckled, so I wet it again and used clips to clip it up, but when it dry agian, there were still buckles in between the clips. Since I already have my drawing on the paper, I didn't want to make the drawing againg, so I used the buckled paper anyway. When I laid my first brush stroke on the wet paper, I was trying to use as much paint on the brush as oil painting, just to found out the color was so intense, I have to dilute the paint with a lot of water.... I am just glad by the end, everything seems working out fine. Next time, I will know better.

Johannes Instructor
07-15-2012, 07:14 AM
Thank you Sherry and Woody for the nice comments. Actually, I did a lot of things wrong during the process. First, I wet the paper and put it on a board, but I used my hand to try to smooth the air babbles underneath the paper and end up lifted off the top layer of the paper. Then, when the paper dry, it buckled, so I wet it again and used clips to clip it up, but when it dry agian, there were still buckles in between the clips. Since I already have my drawing on the paper, I didn't want to make the drawing againg, so I used the buckled paper anyway. When I laid my first brush stroke on the wet paper, I was trying to use as much paint on the brush as oil painting, just to found out the color was so intense, I have to dilute the paint with a lot of water.... I am just glad by the end, everything seems working out fine. Next time, I will know better.
I don't think clips will work. I suspect the paper will slide under them as it dries. I would staple it on plywood or buy the Guerilla stretch board.

xli
07-15-2012, 10:52 PM
Thank you Jo for the advice. Where can I find the Guerilla stretch board? I have tried several way to control the bucking, but had very limited success. I would like to buy the stretch board but I could not find it. By the way, July 14th was another succesful section. Your finished painting is so beautiful. I did not have time to paint along but certainly will try to use the down load to follow your foot steps. Thank you.

Sgourlayart
07-15-2012, 11:35 PM
Thank you Jo for the advice. Where can I find the Guerilla stretch board? I have tried several way to control the bucking, but had very limited success. I would like to buy the stretch board but I could not find it. By the way, July 14th was another succesful section. Your finished painting is so beautiful. I did not have time to paint along but certainly will try to use the down load to follow your foot steps. Thank you.xli, here's a link to get the guerilla stretch boards. http://www.jerrysartarama.com/discount-art-supplies/painting-supplies/watercolor-boards/guerrilla-painter-watercolor-boards-and-carrying-cases.htm Jerry's also carries some much cheaper lightweight plastic corrugated boards that you might want to try first. You could also use a drawing board that you can get at any stationery or art store. Hope this helps. Stu

Johannes Instructor
07-16-2012, 08:57 AM
xli, here's a link to get the guerilla stretch boards. http://www.jerrysartarama.com/discount-art-supplies/painting-supplies/watercolor-boards/guerrilla-painter-watercolor-boards-and-carrying-cases.htm Jerry's also carries some much cheaper lightweight plastic corrugated boards that you might want to try first. You could also use a drawing board that you can get at any stationery or art store. Hope this helps. Stu
With the Guerilla board indicated above it will not buckle one bit. So far for me this has also been the only way I get cero buckling.

Tonalist
07-16-2012, 09:32 AM
Xli..
I used to attach watercolor paper to canvas stretcher bars, after soaking the paper in the tub. I used thumb tacks to attach it. when it dried it was very tight.
The above link from Stu looks very cool also.. a little pricey tho..

woody

xli
07-16-2012, 10:19 AM
Thank you very much Jo, Stu and woody. I will try to get one and do the water color the right way. Thank you everyone again for the helpful advices. Xli

paintncook
07-16-2012, 10:49 AM
Personally, I don't see a big concern about buckling - so what?! I use bulldog clips or masking tape to tape the paper down. Unless you are working on a full sheet, the buckling is no impediment that I can see. I've seen countless demonstrations by professional artists who use only bulldog clips and they seem to do some great art work. If they aren't concerned with it, why should I let it bother me? - paint on! When it dries it flattens back out anyway. That's my opinion on the matter, anyway. For those of you for whom money is tight save it for more paint and paper instead of expensive systems just to keep your paper from buckling. As Johannes has pointed out, if using masking tape, you do have to use some care to avoid backruns at the edges of the tape, but that isn't too hard to do. At least the problem has been a rare one for me. Kathy

hanksgam
07-17-2012, 10:15 AM
Well, I finally said enough!! I started damaging the paper trying to correct things and decided that I had to STOP! Doesn't look bad from a distance and without glasses on but that is about all I can say!
I've never done a watercolor with so much detail and various shapes. Seemed more like an illustration as I was working on it. But that is probably my graphic design background coming out.
Now on to the pan pastel that I haven't completed yet! I am a bit behind!
Joe, thanks for all of your hard work teaching us and stretching our limits!
I have and continue to learn so much from these paint alongs!:clap: :clap:
Randi

mlgk
07-24-2012, 04:29 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/24-Jul-2012/161785-Mill-Johannes-2.jpg
The whites aren't showing up as white as they really are. Also the building is leaning too much but it is because of the way I took the picture. Probably the foreground water needs to be a little darker. Please comment.

Alta Imp
07-25-2012, 03:42 PM
Found this challenging as I have never worked on a watercolor this big. First mistake was doing the drawing with the handiest watercolor pencil which was a spectrum blue that didn't disappear at all when I wet the paper. Next was redoing so many areas that some places on the painting ended up like sandpaper....all great learning what not to do next time. Oh, also managed to get the width 1" shorter so it ended up 14X20 but figured that was the least of my problems. Had to use some pastel for corrections and to bring back the white snow. Barb

Pinklady219
07-30-2012, 06:04 PM
Here is a re-post of my mill painting and the newest version in the spring/summer. Just for fun this time!