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View Full Version : I need more pixilization help!!!!!!


arourapope
04-25-2000, 08:51 PM
I have a number of paintings I have done that were entered into a friend's computer at 72 pix/inch. He is emailing them to me and I have been trying to improve on the images as alot of the detail in the paintings is lost (I have to shrink them to 3.75 x 5.5 inches from the original 15 x 20) Soooo, as I am very new to all this I have tried to do this by increasing the pix to 300/inch....I don't know.....maybe I should have tried something different, but I don't know what. The result is blurred images, screwed up colors, etc. In some of the images I can fix this by smudging the image, hence remixing my colors, but in others there is just too much detail to even see what's going on. Help!!!!!!!! Oh, I'm using Photoshop and Photo Deluxe, and I'm almost computer illiterate.....and I really, really don't want to not be able to print up these images...... Thanks Guys.
Light,
Aurora

loenart
04-25-2000, 09:25 PM
Are these images created on the computer or photos of paintings?

ml

arourapope
04-25-2000, 09:30 PM
they're photos of paintings. I'm about to get a digital camera in the next few weeks (fingers crossed!) and I'm thinking I might do better just reshooting them? What do you think?
Light,
Aurora

Rod
04-25-2000, 10:13 PM
The problem is that they were scanned into the computer at low resolution, You should set the scan resolution a lot higher if you want to print out.Try 300 per inch. Same with camera, they have usually two res settings. Use the higher one for images you want to print,
Rod.


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Watercolours from New Zealand (http://www.artistnation.com/members/paris/rod/)

loenart
04-26-2000, 01:40 AM
Once the images are scanned and saved at a certain resolution it is difficult to get an image to a higher resolution. You should always consider how the image will be used before you start manipulating it.

If the image is to be printed on a color laser or inkjet printer, 300 dpi is adequate.

If the image is for printing it doesn't have to be a .jpeg. A .tif or .pcx might work better.

The .jpeg format has built-in compression that can be adjusted in Photoshop that can affect the printing. The more compression, the lower the quality of image.
See illustration: http://www.artistnation.com/members/lofts/loenart/jpegoptions.jpg

On-line images for a web page should be small enough that the user doesn't have to wait forever to see it. The battle between image size and quality is ongoing. If you are using Photoshop, experimentation will show you how to get the best size/image quality for your pictures.

Sorry about the lecture but the main point is; you have to experiment with the settings and evaluate the resulting image.

This site has good information about web graphics
http://info.med.yale.edu/caim/manual/graphics/graphics.html

ml

arourapope
04-26-2000, 07:05 PM
Thanks guys. I guess I'll just wait on my digital camera and try again....waiting is not my strong point, unfortunately. I appreciate your help though. All in all messing around with Photoshop has been fun.
Light,
Aurora