PDA

View Full Version : What to know about Sanded Paper.


peachdm
05-25-2012, 03:48 PM
:rolleyes: Hi all,

I bought some sanded paper from Blick to try it out. I bought 800 texture, a small one and a very large one. It was on my artist goal list to try it out.

It kinda scares me because nowbecause I have this beautiful paper I don't want to ruin. LOL I really just want to let loose on it and paint whatever comes to mind.

So my questions are:

1. What do I need to know about sanded paper? How does it differ from regular pastel paper? How does it behave?

2. Any tips on "letting loose" on a painting. Where to start...any good subjects. I kinda thought about a Macro (closes up) painting but dunno.

Any good threads I can read regarding these subject that you know of. I tried to search but it wasn't succesfull.

Darlene

SherryC
05-25-2012, 03:59 PM
I understand and felt the same way when I first got expensive art items. What I did was to take a larger size sheet and cut it into several smaller ones. As I experimented with these I did not feel so bad when and if I had to discard the small piece.

peachdm
05-25-2012, 04:09 PM
Thank you Sherry, that is a really good creative idea.

Darlene:)

adventureartist
05-25-2012, 04:16 PM
If you want to go about it in a logical way....do thumbnail sketches and value/color workups on a sketchpad first. Then you have all the details worked out first before working with the sanded paper. It saves time and paper, and takes care of most of the "nervous" about using up paper you don't have a lot of to throw away if you do something you don't like. Also, most sanded papers can be washed off, but it's a bit of a pain waiting for it to dry to make another attempt.

Jason1616
05-25-2012, 04:50 PM
Sanded papers are great to work on because they really hold the pastel. The flip side of that though is it makes it a bit harder to blend adjacent colors.

A great economical alternative to buying pre-sanded papers is to buy the Art Spectrum Colourfix Primer. It's relatively inexpensive and you can prime any kind of paper with it. Use it on some student grade watercolor paper for sanded practice sheets.

I totally understand about that fear of expensive good materials! I think we all feel that at some point.

Jason :)

peachdm
05-25-2012, 05:11 PM
I have a whole pad of watercolor paper that I can use it on just hanging around. I didn't know what to do with it so this is a perfect opportunity. I am going to order some of that primer from Blick.

This is great because now I can go through sheets of it and not feel "guilty" for wasting paper. If it doesn't come out right I can just start over.

allydoodle
05-25-2012, 06:40 PM
I have a whole pad of watercolor paper that I can use it on just hanging around. I didn't know what to do with it so this is a perfect opportunity. I am going to order some of that primer from Blick.

This is great because now I can go through sheets of it and not feel "guilty" for wasting paper. If it doesn't come out right I can just start over.

If the watercolor paper is cold press or rough, you might want to first take it outside and sand the surface down to smooth it a bit. It makes a mess which is why I suggest taking it outside. Then add the primer to the paper. The surface will be a bit smoother for you to paint on (I found I preferred the sanded result, I found it to be nicer to paint on). As a matter of fact, try it both ways to see what you like best!

chewie
05-25-2012, 11:25 PM
I do plein air on my pieces of matboard 'middles', the cut out piece,with that primer on it. if i botch it, eh, no matter. cost was only pennies, in fact it was a recylced surface to start with. if it works, great, I use the good matboard so its also worthy of keeping.

peachdm
05-26-2012, 08:08 AM
Thank you everyone....such great ideas