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Inkling
06-10-2003, 03:39 PM
I am interested in making reproductions of some of my ink drawings to sell. I have a Epson stylus C80 which has the duribrite inks, but I am wondering what kind of paper would be best for this? I already have a package of Wausau bright white acid free card stock I found at Office depot. Would this be okay or is there something better? Anybody here make their own reproductions?

MonicaB
06-10-2003, 04:02 PM
No, but I'm very interested in the same topic. I have an HP that "supposedly" prints photo quality, but I played around with making my own Christmas cards, and the quality was terrible -- even with a hi-res scan. You may want to try experimenting with cheap paper before you invest in anything pricier.

prairie painter
06-10-2003, 04:20 PM
I'm trying to find out more about this too. I asked in another forum, and your printer was the one that was recommended. But I want to do a watercolor wash too, so I was hoping to use watercolor cards. My laser printer proved to be less than desirable for this last Christmas!

drwells
06-10-2003, 05:14 PM
I wanna know too!!! :)

Danny

Elankat
06-10-2003, 10:42 PM
Generally, Epson printers do best when printing on Epson coated paper. My personal experience with my Epson is that printing on non-Epson paper always ends up being a mess.

I know that Arlene does prints of her cp work and uses the C80. She uses the Epson paper whenever possible (usually the Epson heavyweight matte paper). Epson also produces a coated watercolor paper, I believe.

Recently, Arlene asked for recommendations of non-Epson paper that would work with the C80. You can see the recommendations in this thread:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=107945

You may also want to look in the sticky threads at the top of the General Art Business forum or do a search in that forum. There are a lot of great threads about doing your own reproduction prints on ink jet printers.

sassybird
06-11-2003, 01:12 AM
I have been doing a lot of that lately. I use the HP Premium Plus Matte photgraphic paper, and the prints come out very well. It is a bit spendy, but you can check to see if Epison has their own line of photographic papers. The matte IMHO works best. You can also use other specialty papers for printing. I like to use Stonehenge Rising for some of my prints. Remember to keep a count of how many you print, sign and number then as Photographic Print since they do not fall into the fine art printmaking category, but a limited edition seems to attract people more. I wouldn't do more than 25-40 for this type of print. I ask for $20.00 for a limited edition photo print.

Another idea to keep in mind is doing packages of blank greeting cards with your work on the front. You can pick up reams of cardstock at a very reasonable price, and then score it yourself before you print. I have been selling a lot of those packages lately. I charge $7 for a pkt of 5, and $15 for a package of 10. People seem to like them.

Oldthumbs
06-11-2003, 09:20 AM
Cheap paper is appealing, but in the end, you will only waste money. I have a C80 and have experimented with different papers, and the truth is that the Epson paper does work best. I have found others that are slightly less expensive that work nearly as well, but hardly worth bothering. In particular, though, I found that Kodak papers do not work with the C80, particularly the glossy.

Also, and I know this is obvious, but if your printer is not calibrated to your monitor (and calibrated to your scanner), you will never get a print that looks like your drawing. Of course, this isn't as much of a problem with pen and ink drawings. :)

Ray

Elankat
06-11-2003, 10:09 AM
Originally posted by sassybird
I have been doing a lot of that lately. I use the HP Premium Plus Matte photgraphic paper, and the prints come out very well. It is a bit spendy, but you can check to see if Epison has their own line of photographic papers. The matte IMHO works best. You can also use other specialty papers for printing. I like to use Stonehenge Rising for some of my prints. Remember to keep a count of how many you print, sign and number then as Photographic Print since they do not fall into the fine art printmaking category, but a limited edition seems to attract people more. I wouldn't do more than 25-40 for this type of print. I ask for $20.00 for a limited edition photo print.


I'd be very wary of using HP paper with an Epson printer. I've used HP glossy photographic paper with my Epson 875 Photo and the ink just scraped right off the paper, even after being dry for days. As far as Stonehenge, I'm pretty certain that Arlene has said that the Stonehenge doesn't work well with the Epson C80, but you'd have to verify that with her.

Epson printers really can make lovely prints, but they can be quite a pain in the bottom.

Inkling
06-11-2003, 11:36 AM
Thank you so much Sassybird, Elankat, and Oldthumbs for the information about the paper. I am going to look today for the brands you mentioned. :)

Sassybird- I have seen prints or reproductions numbered and signed, but where should I put the words 'photographic print'? On the back or the front?

artdude
06-11-2003, 11:49 AM
I get my photographic reproductions done at my local drug store. They have one of those fancy copy machines that can reproduce copies of your photographs. I looked into the paper and ink they use and I was told that it is all archival. I can't remember the name of the copier though. The other good thing about using this method is that I can get my work resized up to 11" X 17" and smaller if I like. Since most of my work is smaller than the 11 by 17 it works well for me. They will run some demo copies for me until I feel that the image is just like the original. I have some copies that I did 5 years ago and they look just as good as the ones I had done recently. Each copy costs me about $1.50 Canadian. I can even get two images on one sheet at times :D:)