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Niol
04-19-2001, 10:34 AM
How do you all find a place to paint outside. A place with no unwanted interruptions (animals, weather o.k.). I have tried state parks, parking along roadsides very early in a.m. before much traffic, snapping photos outside and trying to paint from them inside (very dissatisfying). No place offers the isolation sought.

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NJH

Robert
04-20-2001, 08:00 AM
Hi Niol,
The nice thing about Wisconsin is that there are still a lot of farms there. Most farmers are happy to have their landscapes painted. The endless combination of buildings, pasture, tilled land and woods makes for a variety of interesting compositions. I usually just knock on a likely door and let whoever's there know that I'd like to paint on their land and I won't mess anything up.
Nobody has ever said no and I've even had people go out of their way to show me nice scenes on their property. I generally paint alone so the contact I have with farmers is a nice break. It's also relaxing to know that someone nearby knows where you are and why you're there.

Good luck!

Bob

Niol
04-22-2001, 01:36 PM
Thanks, Bob, for the suggestion. I am not bold enough to take this path though. Most of the farmers if they do see me are very congenial as they drive by with their equipment. Some residents of the more rural areas, usually not the farmers, however, find me intrusive which I understand and must respect and I generally do not finish there. Once I was checked for suspicious behavior, having parked alongside road, remaining in car working on small canvas. Someone's farm would begin to solve the problem--will have to work on that. Thx.

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NJH

LarrySeiler
04-25-2001, 04:02 PM
I lived 26 years in Green Bay...16 between Rice Lake and Eau Claire, and now have moved up into the Nicolet National Forest of NE Wisconsin.

I've learned to tune out.
Heck..I've painted in the noisiest places, which just becomes part of the game. In fact, I don't ignore crowds..as the educator in me sees it as opportunity for good promotion, which Wisconsin sorely sorely needs!

Where I live now though...is isolation. I can find a road that doesn't cross another that gets me anywhere for 19 miles. Its want you want...sacrifices you may be willing or need to make. Still...I've been down around Madison, south of there...West of there where it really breaks out nicely into rolling steep hills. Areas that overlook the now swollen Mississippi. I'd commit myself to weekends I guess to start with, so you have a bit of time to travel some distance. But...with the Dells not too far away, or the western rolling country not too far away...I'd venture some decent places could be found.

Larry http://www.artsmentor.org

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The Artsmentor

"Painting is easy when you don't know how, but very difficult when you do!" Edgar Degas

Niol
04-26-2001, 06:35 AM
Larry: Thanks for response. I just replied lengthily and lost the whole thing--disconnected, took me too long. Gist of it all--will find the solution, just takes some tailoring. Have driven SW Wisconsin until I think I know all the roads, made it to Nicolet one day, checked out the Leopold reserve near Portage. Renting a cabin close to chosen site may work. Landscapes to paint are everywhere. Laughed at one of your instructional sites at the statement that you jumped in the car and 30 miles later . . . The getting to and fro has been a major problem for me--fatigues and robs me of the enormous energy output required by painting. Visited your site--especially liked the Pestigo River painting--more subdued colors. Note your fondness for rivers, water. Sugar River my especial weakness in this area. Thx again.

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NJH

paintfool
04-26-2001, 11:48 AM
I make mental notes as i drive. "Must paint that!" "Have to come here to paint!" I've said it before and i'll say it again, every time i drive down the very same roads that i drive down daily i see things that i've never noticed before! I live in Central Florida, which is far different from the touristy areas that most people associate with Florida. We have beautiful swamps and rivers complete with spanish moss and jungle like atomoshperes. (they filmed a lot of the Tarzan movies here) It is also horse country so finding sprawling ranches is never a problem. I have no problem with pulling over on the side of the road to paint. The biggest problem for me is deciding which scene to do next. But one thing that women need to think about is saftey. When i decide to paint in a very remote location i take my husband along & he fishes while i paint. We make a picnic out of it. When i venture out on my own i always use my cell phone to call home & let my husband know where i am. He insists on it actually. Also, if i decide to paint on the side of the road i make sure that there is ample space to pull off and be a very aware of your distance from the actual road, again, a saftey issue and of course you wouldn't want dust from passing cars to get on your canvas or palette. I believe saftey should always be the first concern, especially for women.
You may want to take an afternoon to just drive around scouting out places to paint and take notes.
Cheryl

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paintfool

Niol
04-26-2001, 02:20 PM
Paintfool: Thanks for suggestions. I do note myriads of things to paint as I make my rounds even within the city--but where to stop and actually pull out a canvas continues to be a problem. I think painters are relatively rare birds and their activities appear somewhat questionable or even suspect to many and though I am able to "tune out" as suggested by Larry I still prefer not to have to tune out--i.e., isolation--which means wilderness areas where, however, safety indeed does become an issue. I may be able to put together some hodgepodge of travel, photos, drawings, notes and slides and then like it or not finish inside. During the current season, renting a cabin sounds like a good try to solve my problem. Thx again.

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NJH

LarrySeiler
04-26-2001, 04:00 PM
Safety...that is an interesting issue.

My wife likes to remind me of late, that I'm getting older and have to begin to take certain cautions. Not to mock her, but I think she may be watching one too many warm & fuzzy shows..like Oprah. She fears I could keel over and have a heart attack out in the middle of no where. I'm 46 years old...not ready to keel over yet.

However...I've gone stream trout fishing a couple miles in where only one equipped with a GPS unit could find their way out in a hurry, or with encroaching darkness.

I have taken portable paint set-ups, and have ventured where I know many would not. Safety for me, I guess...is the issue of gettin' back to the vehicle or not. So...I'm lookin' forward to when they have those disposable paper phones available to carry along with...just ta comfort the wifey I'll be along by and by.

Now...I have discovered a few places (far and between) where some hairballed strange thing called a man comes a spitt'n and a spewin' from the thickets out of no where, sounding like he's watched one too many all star wrestling shows. After runnin' into some scary sorts that band up and take issue with outsiders comin and taking upon themselves to enjoy <FONT size="6">THEIR </FONT s> resources, I have half thought of carrying a licensed side arm.

<IMG SRC="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Apr-2001/crazed_man.JPG" border=0>

Paintin' can be wierd at times!

Larry

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The Artsmentor

"Painting is easy when you don't know how, but very difficult when you do!" Edgar Degas


[This message has been edited by lseiler (edited April 26, 2001).]

paintfool
04-26-2001, 07:21 PM
LOL Larry!
http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif
Cheryl

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paintfool

Niol
04-27-2001, 02:25 PM
Hilarious, but . . . I also have had a few encounters with "hairballed strange things" which keeps me within jumping distance of my car when I am out in the wild. Never have been able to understand it--emerging as they do from bushes--and I am always totally surprised having worked I thought with all antennae functioning after radar sweep of entire area. Not only do they emerge, they run at you. So anyway, not just innocents out there.

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NJH

LarrySeiler
04-27-2001, 04:26 PM
I'm more comfortable around the dense thickets of the dark unknowns filled with all its critters...than I am walking around some of the streets in Milwaukee or Chicago! http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

I have spent much of my life out of doors. However...I have run into scary types, for real. Types that resent law officials, the DNR...etc; Painting does not rank right up there with your "manly" activities expected of the true northern outdoor man!

I will be posting soon another editorial outdoor plein air session demo, this one in oil. You'll probably see the decent sized knife I have strapped to my back belt. Also... I often take along my metal ammo boxes from the army/navy surplus stores...which have printed ammunition specs on the sides. These I put in routed sides of inserted wood boards, wet oil panels, and carry extra gessoed ready to go panels. However...someone approaching seeing those might take a second thought.

I've only had a few attempt to drive me off the road...other than that most encounters have been quite friendly.

Consider how many bands would be popular or CD's would sell without the concert experience. I feel that the public really is somewhat disconnected from the visual artist experience. Being visible...is good promo, and makes painting a dignified bonafied activity.

Though having a 9mm Baretta 16 shot handgun with glow in the dark sighting dangling from one's waist might cause other assumptions about those "artist" types! http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/eek.gif

Larry

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The Artsmentor

"Painting is easy when you don't know how, but very difficult when you do!" Edgar Degas

Niol
04-27-2001, 05:56 PM
Aha! So the comfortable thickets and critters warrant ammo boxes, knives and guns! Good to know others take similar precautions, although the hardware is not my tack. Disguise--hood up and over head, my eye safety glasses, etc., is. All of which makes me realize such precautions probably have the unwanted effect of drawing people on as they check out what appears to be threatening behavior. The whole thing makes me roar with laughter but it is dangerous to move around alone--anywhere I suppose. Promo I will leave to others--takes everything I can muster and total focus just to paint.

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NJH

Phyllis Rennie
04-27-2001, 09:11 PM
Geez!!! You tryin' t' scare me? So far I've only done three plein air: one in my backyard, one across the street, and one at our friends arena. Even if I don't go much further than that, I think there's enough material there to keep me busy for a long time. But I might add the local park, the state park, the church parking lot, some friends yards, ......and if I exhaust all those places, I could always go to visit my relatives. Pa. has a lot of variety.

Niol
04-27-2001, 09:48 PM
Phyllis: Not trying to scare, just discussing a real problem for my particular requirements--painting without the need to tune out distractions and painting in wilderness areas. Painting has never been a social activity for me other than the exchange of information as on WC or the communication any painting affords when viewed by another. I dislike group painting and may as well set up a donut stand as chat with everyone who comes along in the kinds of environments you describe. Appreciate your reaction though.

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NJH

LarrySeiler
04-27-2001, 09:51 PM
Not a lot of high paying jobs in sparse northwoods...'cept logging, and logging carries a certain testosterone thing about it.

A friend of mine got attacked by a pool cue when we stopped to eat at a bar/cafe and had a fish fry dinner. Played a game of pool afterward, but he put a quarter in a juke box and played a "Doors" song. Six guys wearning Nascar shirts and hats (later find out to be brothers), didn't like that...and one took the cue to my friend in the groin area saying, "THAT'S Hippy music!"

I'd say 8 of 10 vehicles up here is a truck, or SUV. They pride themselves in living a tough life, and surviving the winters. They are red neck as all get out. They think all the game belong to them...and ignore harvest rules to take what they want.

It takes a unique person to prefer isolation to the company of people...(sorta like many artists)...and, the assertive toughness of it all brings out the shadiest side of many.

What I see is the peer pressure thing of high school...(remember???), it has never ended for folks up here. Loggers...forestry people. Work hard...play hard...drink hard.

Some parts remind me of the movie deliverance! Deedle lee dum dum dum dum dahhhm (banjo).

Yet...there is this sereal mix of tourism, resorts...pretty lakes, and many nice & professional people that get away from it all during the summer.

Take a good look at my icon. I'm over six foot tall. Weigh about 215...and by this part of the country's standards have that look as though I can take care of myself. I go and paint where I want!

Just remember that now so someone here can offer to be interviewed incase I disappear and show up in a shallow grave in some cedar swamp! hee hee......

Really...I hardly ever see anyone when I paint. If I do...they are usually curious, but most always respectful. Only the loggers think I ought to get a real job and a few have got a chuckle out of trying to scare me with their big mighty man trucks! http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/rolleyes.gif

Larry

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The Artsmentor

"Painting is easy when you don't know how, but very difficult when you do!" Edgar Degas

[This message has been edited by lseiler (edited April 27, 2001).]

tammy
04-28-2001, 12:31 AM
My imagination finds quite abit to do in my backyard and I do mean backyard with its fence, green grass and few trees. LOL, my imagaination has lots to do but it is a private place to paint and fairly quiet even with the motels and exspressway just beyond.

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Don't worry, its gonna be all right....
Tammy's Home for Artists (http://tammy.artistnation.com)

Niol
04-28-2001, 05:23 PM
Tammy: I would be quite content to work in the privacy of my own backyard--if I had one. I live in a small, edge-of-the-city apartment, 2nd floor, northwest view, little balcony facing a ravine with lots of old oaks and a few cottonwood trees. A fox believe it or not came wandering down the creek one day. A red shouldered hawk appears periodically. Lots of squirrels, rabbits, birds. It is quiet and I do work on small canvases looking out the window. But my biggest love is big vistas and wilderness and I am driven there I guess at whatever the cost.

So off I go for the next couple of weeks--ditto to Larry's last post re offer to be interviewed.



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NJH

Rose Queen
04-28-2001, 06:17 PM
Niol, please come out to Pasadena, California, which was a hotbed of plein air painters in the early part of the 20th century and whose landscapes are still largely intact, which is pretty much a miracle considering that we border on Los Angeles. I walk my dog every day in a lovely arroyo south of an historic bridge which has more vistas worth painting than anyone has a long enough life to execute.

Speaking of safety, do you have a friend with a dog you could borrow when you go out to paint? I think this is more of an issue for women, but most potential "botherers" would think twice before taking on even a relatively small dog.

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Art is anything you can get away with. ~Terence Trent D'Arby

paintfool
04-28-2001, 06:45 PM
Although i do not mind the occasional spectator, i really love some of the scenery offerd by some pretty remote locations. I am female, 5'2" and barley 113 lbs. This is not a topic intended to frieghten any one out of plein air painting as it is a truly awsome way to spend a beautiful day, but rather just a reminder that saftey should be practiced in anything that we do. You know, Larry, i never thought about taking a dog! Unfortunatley we lost our beautiful Rottweiler two days before easter. She was only four years old and in seemingly good health. It may have been a heart attack. We just don't know. But i do plan on getting another dog soon. I'm not at all used to not having one! Once i do, i think i'll start taking him/her painting with me! What a great idea that is! Alex wouldn't have let anyone get within 20 feet of me. It would also be a good bonding experience for me and the dog.
Cheryl

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paintfool

Niol
04-29-2001, 06:36 PM
Rose Queen: Not familiar with the 20th century painters you mention--will have to look up. Beautiful landscapes across all states no doubt. Pasadena too far flung for me altho every Spring I have to tie myself down not to call Good Will, dump everything, and take off with a tailgate studio to wherever. Fortunately I recognize a pipedream when I have one. Dog an interesting idea for someone. Do not think would work for me. Am ready to revisit my usual haunts this coming week and make it work no matter what. Thanks for comments.

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NJH

Rose Queen
04-30-2001, 01:04 AM
Actually, Southern California was positively overrun with plein air painters in the early 20th Century. Among the better known are William Lees Judson, Hanson Puthuff, Marian Kavanagh Wachtel and her husband, Elmer Wachtel, Guy Rose and Jean Mannheim. Here's a website where you can look at one of Elmer Wachtel's paintings currently for sale: http://www.jstewart.com/tjsg_ew.html

Other sites with information about these and other California plein air painters are http://www.irvineworldnews.com/Bstories/feb8/art.html, http://www.friendcalib.org/lit-landmarks/pasadena/star2-3.html, and http://www.californiaart.com/archive7.html.

Good luck visiting your usual haunts this week!

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Art is anything you can get away with. ~Terence Trent D'Arby

Yorky
04-30-2001, 03:32 AM
<IMG SRC="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/lib/01-May-2001/swaledalesmall.jpg" border=0>
Just come to Yorkshire to paint - and leave your guns and knives at home. The sheep are friendly!

Doug

[This message has been edited by Yorky (edited May 01, 2001).]

Yorky
04-30-2001, 03:39 AM
Sorry folks! I hope this works (now .gif)
<IMG SRC="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/lib/01-May-2001/Swaledalesmall.jpg" border=0>

[This message has been edited by Yorky (edited May 01, 2001).]

Niol
04-30-2001, 05:40 PM
Rose Queen: Thanks for links. I do remember Wachtel now that I see the painting--and do like his paintings. Have not visited the other sites yet but will do. Did have seven hours of haunt visiting today--the things I saw! Why do I ever stay inside. Thx again.

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NJH

Niol
04-30-2001, 05:45 PM
Yorky: Now that comment belongs on a Deepak Chopra web site discussing "coincidence". Just took long travels today and as I was coming home passed an expansive hillside on which were--many, many, many sheep and even more new spring lambs. What a beautiful sight. Drove back and forth a couple of times and stopped by the side of the road. Black ones and white ones. Many ewes(?) with sometimes four lambs baaing around her.

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NJH

BillieD
04-30-2001, 11:49 PM
To be honest with you, I don't give undue thought to the dangers of painting outdoors. I hear more horror stories about people being hi-jacked on the Mall parking lot, and I live in West Texas where there is plenty of wide open spaces...

The main thing is to use common sense, I wouldn't paint out anywhere suspicious characters are hanging out, than I would park where the lighting is bad, or even go back to the car if unsavory people were hanging out near my parking space at the mall.

When going out for a painting session, let someone know what area you plan to paint in and when to expect you home. Don't step anywhere you can not see where you are putting your foot, (rattlesnakes are my biggest worry).

And I don't suggest taking a dog, unless the dog you take is better diciplined than mine is. You will spend all your time attending to the dog.

I am fortunate to belong to a Guild, we have began having monthly 'Plein Air Picnics', this gives us access to ranches and historical sites we wouldn't normally have the courage to ask to use. Also, I enjoy sharing ideas and learning from the more experienced members and guests. One of my favorite living heroes joins all our playdays.

Niol
05-01-2001, 05:08 PM
BillieD: Good thoughts. Thx. May look for some such group here--imagine just because you go out together doesn't mean you have to paint in tandem. Have found a secluded, little-used state park complete with lake and ranger who makes the rounds frequently. Have to keep a "find" a secret, however. Revealed the location to one person once. Mistake.

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NJH

Rose Queen
05-01-2001, 11:12 PM
<IMG SRC="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-May-2001/ColoradoStBridge.JPG" border=0>

Niol, I can't compete with Yorky's gorgeous photograph, but here's a photo of the 1912 Colorado Street Bridge, part of old Route 66, that figures in so many early California plein air paintings. My digital camera's not a very good one, but I hope the grace of the old bridge comes through. Regrettably, a later 1950s-era freeway bridge clutters the photo beyond the old bridge, but what's artistic license for if you can't edit that out? Anyway, this is where I come for plein air painting and my faithful cocker spaniel keeps me company when he's not off terrorizing squirrels and rabbits.

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Art is anything you can get away with. ~Terence Trent D'Arby

[This message has been edited by Rose Queen (edited May 01, 2001).]

paintfool
05-02-2001, 01:41 AM
Originally posted by BillieD:
The main thing is to use common sense
Billie, i couldn't agree with you more.
It was never my intention to scare any one out of plein air painting. It's probably the nature of my business (i own a janitorial service) which makes me somewhat a saftey fanatic. My employees are often alone in secluded areas and we've developed some pretty stringent saftey rules. I guess after so many years of thinking in that capacity it's a natural for me to ponder such issues. But please guys, by all means.... get out there! have fun and bring home a great painting!
Rose Queen, what a great bridge! Have you painted it? If not, do you intend to?
Cheryl



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paintfool

Niol
05-02-2001, 10:45 AM
RoseQueen: Thx for photo. Can appreciate bridge and will moreso after viewing artists you mention--am having trouble with links and searches. Did find more on Wachtel and discover I was thinking of Twachtman not Wachtel in earlier post. Some of the Wachtel's if I dare venture such a comment look like early phases of a painting. Others I liked as finished paintings. Wonderful to have a piece of architecture that in itself is aesthetic (a few Frank Lloyd Wrights out here) rather than those things, those from outter space or wherever conglomerate monsters that are plopped right on the very top of a hill, not blending in with the landscape at all but standing apart from it, that some architect in this territory has succeeded in selling. They irritate and annoy me beyond my ability to express. So I will find the paintings with the bridge eventually. Thx.

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NJH

Niol
05-02-2001, 10:55 AM
Paintfool: Common sense good but common sense plus keeping informed better--the rules you mention. Have watched a few TV programs about how not to be a victim since I know I take chances when I go the places I go. Several tips have served me well. Predators attack like a shark--one pass to assess vulnerability, second the attack. But anyway, so much for the dark side. May one day have voice recognition robots--there's an answer. All part of the grit that makes the pearl I guess.

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NJH

BillieD
05-02-2001, 06:30 PM
I didn't mean to belittle any suggestions to make your painting experience a safe one. But, I was getting a bit anxious.

Any and all precautions should be taken. They are pretty much the same you would take on a crowded street. I lock my purse in the car, being sure I keep the keys in my pocket. Judge the probability of running into someone...etc. But, the possibility of running into someone who wants to do you harm is much less than what you would expect in a crowd. Just think of the percentages.

I've also found there are more good people out there than bad. It is the bad ones you hear about. In my young and restless days, running around in a beat up truck or car on Maypop Tires, I cannot count the number of times some one has stopped to give aid. Never even came close to a scary situation...but, that doesn't mean it cannot happen. So be wary! But, remain open minded as well.

Rose Queen
05-02-2001, 08:46 PM
Cheryl, I haven't painted the Bridge yet, but I walk the dog near it every day, have taken many, many photos of it, and am working up to painting it! I'm still more unsure of myself as an artist than not...

Niol, actually, I like Marian Wachtel much better than her husband. She was one of the finest watercolorists of the 20th century, which is interesting because she was originally an oil painter, but when she married Elmer, she changed to watercolors because they weren't considered quite so serious a medium as oil and she didn't want to overshadow her husband. After he died, she went back to oil painting.

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Art is anything you can get away with. ~Terence Trent D'Arby

LDianeJohnson
05-03-2001, 02:19 PM
Hi Niol,

So many good suggestions here, take a pup, watch the snakes, ticks, tune-out, and the like.

You just have to keep searching till you find places that work for you. Also try painting in places where only a couple of people are to get used to having them around. Most places you'll be interested in painting, others will like to visit or view for the same beauty or characteristics you are painting for. Or try private gardens and land where you are more apt to have privacy.

Part of the plein air experience is "the hunt"...looking for that special place to paint. It does take more energy, time and patience, but is well worth the effort.

Good thread you started. Thank you.
Diane

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L. Diane Johnson (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/) NAPA, PSA
2001/2002 Plein Air Workshops (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/workshops/)

LarrySeiler
05-03-2001, 04:58 PM
Oh yeah...Diane...the ticks! Perhaps in one of my lessons this summer, I'll deal with things I do to prep for painting.

One small plein air I did which can be seen on my Artsmentor site gallery called, "Bradley's Secret"... was interesting. I was in knee high grasses along this small secluded lake for perhaps 1-1/2 hours tops...but, there were wood ticks everywhere. Can be a creepy feeling. Of course...the smallest, the wood tick..is the one to worry about.

I'm looking this year into the three series innoculation for Lymes.

My son suffered with Lymes in his 8th grade year, and missed 48 days of school with the worst migraines. That's one thing that comes with living in the out of doors. Medications and time have leaned in my son's favor, though I guess he'll always have it. Its dormant and likely to no longer be a problem...in fact, if I understand, he is now somewhat immune from the pesty critter.

At a minimum...I tuck my pant trousers inside my socks...pulling the socks up high.

Mosquitos and dreaded black flies can be the worst and hated to plague the plein 'airist. Some people are sensitive to the application of sprays, which fortunately I am not. It is such things I think of which makes my painting in knee high on up snow all the more tolerable.

Oh well...I'll still be out there, because its what I do, can do...and thus feel called and obligated to do!

Larry

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The Artsmentor

"Painting is easy when you don't know how, but very difficult when you do!" Edgar Degas

paintfool
05-03-2001, 07:04 PM
We have these pesky little tiny black bugs that like to land on my paintings. I've taken to spraying a rag with bug spray and draping it over the BACK of my easel and haven't had a problem since! As for ticks, yeah they can be nasty! Bug spray is always a good thing to have on hand when painting outdoors! I have a friend who contracted Lymes disease last year and yes, it was rough! And yes, Larry, it did come from the tiniest tick imaginable! (BTW, my fiends name is Larry! http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif )
Cheryl

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paintfool

Niol
05-04-2001, 10:01 AM
Women vs. men, women and men, women-men, men-women--no territory free from this topic.
DIANE: Thx for post--especially the "hunt" comment. Realize now why I seek distant horizons. Until now have only considered hunt in connection with staying out of rustling bushes when the hunting seasons are on.
BILLIEG: Not belittled by your post--especially reminder to take car keys. Locked myself out once 40 mi. out in country, old clunk car, nothing within easy walking distance. Franctically picked up a rock and hurled at driver's side window and--it bounced! Did succeed in transforming my anxiety into laughter and calming went about finding a hanger in the trunk that would never lock and maneuvered through the 1" opening I had left in the window and unlocked the old handle. Lucky. Have carried a double set of keys ever since, one always with me.

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NJH

Niol
05-04-2001, 10:08 AM
LARRY: So you describe yourself as a "conduit" (one of your instructonals)--exactly what I have thought of myself, which is why I hate interruptions--breaks the connection from cosmos to canvas. Ticks, bugs, how about bears up there. Have also made many U-turns at large signs announcing entrance to native American domain and subjection to all laws, etc. Have no knowledge of the laws altho do love the native Americans.
PAINTFOOL: Thanks for suggestion re bugs. Have never found solution for that problem--will try yours. Near lakes sometimes a whole tornado approaches. Getting stuck in WetCanvas not just for bugs I am discovering.

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NJH

Niol
05-04-2001, 10:22 AM
ROSEQUEEN: Above comment re women vs men responding to your post but computer did not register RoseQueen--computer also disconnects way into long posts so have decided to post in sections. The women/men issues--who can even define them!

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NJH

Ivyleaf
05-04-2001, 10:52 AM
An interesting commercial I saw on TV last night that I thought I'd throw in here:

Cell phone company wants to sell phones of course, and shows clips of all the different places you can use a cell phone. The last clip in the commercial is an artist out painting a beautiful scene, talking of course on her cell phone http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif .

Gave me a laugh and a good idea at the same time. Make sure that cell phone's always charged and carry a charger in the car with you.

While in the remotest of areas a cell phone may not work, in that case I'd highly recommend taking a buddy with you. Common sense prevails and a good gun doesn't hurt either http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif .




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"There's a time when you have to seperate yourself from what other people expect of you, and do what you love. Because if you find yourself 50 years old and you aren't doing what you love, then what's the point?" Actor Jim Carrey (Side note, substitute any age as appropriate :) )

LDianeJohnson
05-04-2001, 02:49 PM
Thanks for the great "tick" tutorial Larry. Amazing how many disciplines one must know just to paint!

Ahhh, cell phones. Unfortunately the US has not caught up with Europe with these mighty wireless wonders. There are more wireless phones in some European countries (notably Sweden & Finland), than land lines. We have analog, digital, and GSM, dotted around the country but there are still not enough towers of any kind to gain coverage everywhere in the US. I recommend buying one which can change out the memory chip so you don't have to keep programming. That way, you can always have the best phone for the type of coverage you have where you'll be painting. And taking that painting buddy is even better!

D.

Niol
05-05-2001, 10:52 AM
Ivyleaf & Artistry: Have cell phone--remembering to charge is the glitch. Fortunately the one I have has an attachment that plugs into the cigarette lighter for charging (people still smoke?). Did see the commercial last night. Did make me laugh.

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NJH