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View Full Version : Hot tulips...oil pastel heat technique


Dyin
06-05-2003, 06:06 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2003/19147-HOT_TULIPS.jpg

I did this in an hour versus the normal days it takes me to do a realistic painting. I wanted to play and so I decided to try a print using hot OPs ( got the idea from an older Pastel Journal article). WARNING....if you try this use cheap OPs...it EATS them up in seconds....
I heated an oven pan on the stove top with a smooth piece of tin foil on the bottom. When it was good and hot I did a quick sketch and then lightly reheated it. Then I took a good heavy watercolor paper and set it carefully down and burnished the back of the paper with a large soup spoon, being extremely careful not to move the paper as it will smear.
It looked rough when I lifted it but then I went to my Sennelier OPs and shaded in some of the subject and filled in the background.
I really like the bold, fresh look of it even though it's so different from my normal work...what do you think?

CarlyHardy
06-05-2003, 07:20 PM
I'm not sure I understood the process that you described, but it sounds interesting. I did something like this with crayola crayons once....melted them and poured them onto a canvas type fabric...then used wax paper to iron over them to melt out the excess wax.

Your painting has a fresh look about it that I like. Not too sure I'd have chosen the violet background...I think something to give more contrast to the tulips would have made them pop more. But that's a personal choice.
carly

Mo.
06-05-2003, 07:22 PM
Hi Sue:) ~ I'm not absolutely sure I follow your technique, did you heat the pastels in the pan? Can you explain your technique in more detail? I feel I've missed something.

Your painting is bold and vibrant, but is this technique worthwhile? Is it just melting the OP's sorry to seem so dim, but maybe you can explain more.

cheers,
Mo.

Dyin
06-05-2003, 07:34 PM
thanks for your comments...the colors seem to pop on the original...I liked the shock of the violet...sorry I was fuzzy on the instructions....You heat the tinfoil in the hot pan and then while it's still hot (leave the foil right in the hot pan) you draw with the OPs (or you can leave out the foil and just paint right on the pan, just a lot harder to clean up)....since it's hot the OPs go on super thick and gooey, then while it's still warm enough to be liquidy you put a clean paper on top of the tinfoil sketch and burnish the back of it so it picks up part of what you sketched....it may require heating the pan back up, if the OPs aren't still warm enough they won't transfer. It's a bit unpredictable...if you get too much on it doesn't look right, if it's not still hot it won't pick up right and if you move the paper it smears. The foil is just a throw away part of it after you've transfered it to paper and you can keep heating the foil in the pan and add more colors and do new pieces of paper too. Does that explain it any better?

Cindy Aspden
06-05-2003, 07:42 PM
Sue! I love the colors and glad you had fun after that nasty(but incredible) ole lizard! Sounds like a exciting method. That's cool, I've never heard of pastels being done like this before. How old was that journal? Off the ark?(teehee!) Awesome job.

cindy

Dyin
06-05-2003, 07:44 PM
Mo...is it worthwhile? Well, my first try was a while back and it came out horribly, but it's nice to know what different effects you can do with the medium...it's a lot like raku....the heat changes things...it's a bit messy, and like I said...wouldn't use expensive OPs....but it can be an interesting effect for part of a painting...you can't totally control it but that makes it exciting...and it was fun to do something that's out of my norm...my May project took me days of work with all the detail. I'd say it's worth playing with. A little practice makes for better results too...plus you can scrape to correct and add to it.

Mo.
06-05-2003, 07:45 PM
:) Still trying to get my head around this one ~ tell me if I've got this wrong ~ From what you are saying, the initial sketch is done on the foil? ~ then heated in the pan? Am I right so far? ~ not sure what you mean by ~ 'paint right on the pan' ~ you mean paint on the actual pan :confused: This seems to be a bit of a messy technique.:D Where does the watercolour paper come into being? :confused:

Sorry Sue I'm finding this hard to grasp.


:confused:
Mo.

editing here... is this the encaustic technique ot similar?

Kathryn Wilson
06-05-2003, 07:59 PM
Are you familiar with the "monoprint" process - this sounds alot like it. You draw on the foil, which is hot and melts the OP's while you are drawing, then you take the foil and turn it upside down onto paper and burnishing onto the paper?

I voted in the poll - I have tried two OP's and they look very childish. I may just be too heavy-handed for OP's, or pastels or that matter. Think I might give acrylics a shot. Don't freak, just having spent all day in the studio using soft pastels, not sure how anything turned out (one for the pastel riot, one for the weekly pastel limited time project).



:(

Dyin
06-05-2003, 07:59 PM
I'm sure it's how I'm explaining it...sorry!

heat the pan with the foil in it
then...
do your (yes, messy) sketch directly on the hot foil
then
while it is still hot you transfer it to paper
don't let the paper move
you rub the back of the paper while it's on the tin foil to get it to transfer
and yes, you could paint directly on the pan too...foil is an easier clean up. Once the OPs cool they are hard again...but we are talking losing a quarter inch of OP on a single stroke while the pan is hot...it just plain melts it. But if you do it too thin then it doesn't transfer right...

Dyin
06-05-2003, 08:03 PM
Kyle...that's IT!!!! Only instead of turning the foil upside down on the paper you put the paper on the foil and burnish/rub the back of it....
Won't freak out...we all have to find our perfect medium...I just happen to like the OPs...I think they and I can grow together lol!

Mikki Petersen
06-06-2003, 03:00 AM
What a sizzler! Those colors just grab you and shake you up. I'm fascinated by the technique. I have a bunch of cheap oil pastels to get rid of, maybe I'm try this melt technique. It's sort of like a reverse encaustic. I just recently was introduced to encaustic and have had great fun playing around. This sounds like a good creative warm-up too. Thanks for sharing.

E-J
06-06-2003, 03:50 AM
Dyin

I answered your poll but the techniques I've tried with oil pastels have been very basic so far ... ie, using them over an acrylic underpainting and moving the colour with Shapers or a brush ...
tried blending with linseed oil but it seemed to stay very wet ... I certainly haven't done anything as unusual as this! It took a while for me to understand the process you were describing but it sounds exciting. I guess you could prepare the paper beforehand if you wanted by painting in the background colours first?

Dyin
06-06-2003, 09:09 AM
Thanks Impete! I was pretty excited by the colors too...
EJ...you could try...but it's not entirely controlable...Since the OPs are in a liquid state they tend to run or spread a little. And I'm not sure if they wouldn't melt what's already on the paper...but that's why I'm experimenting...you'll have to try it a couple times to get some good results, would love to see what someone else can do with it....

Dima
06-08-2003, 11:52 AM
If life is a box of oil pastels we must heat them up every now and then.

Nice effect and wonderfully bright colours, Dyin.
And great you are trying out new techniques.
Seems like a bit of a complicated encaustic technique you used here, though.

I have been contemplating trying my hand at encaustic techniques with oil pastels.
What I would like to find is a flat square or rectangular surface with an adjustable heat source and I thought there might be appliances for grilling meat that would do, but I only found the ones with the ribbed surfaces in the shops.
I did an experiment holding a piece of synthetic canvas at the back/bottom of an iron heater so I could control the amount of heat and applying the oilpastels on it worked great.
It did eat the pastels a bit depending on the amount of pressure applied, but not nearly as much as you describe.
Still I would not use my Senneliers for first experiments.

Does anyone know of apparatus for grilling/baking with a totally flat metal surface and adjustable heat?
Or does anyone have alternative ideas for encaustic techniques?
This could open up a lot of new possibilities for painting with oilpastels and waxcrayons.

Dick

Dyin
06-08-2003, 11:58 AM
Thanks Dima...it was fun, but I'd like to find another method too. I'm thinking about what a hot hair dryer will do...you might try a specialty cooking store for a flat grill...let us know if you come up with anything....

Khadres
04-13-2004, 01:26 AM
You could buy what is called a "griddle" that goes on your stove and then control the heat of the stove burners. Griddles are largish and smoothe and not very expensive usually.

Dyin
04-13-2004, 01:54 PM
That's a good idea...I've even seen electric griddles really cheap! Sooooo...are you going to try this out????? :D

hamsterdance
04-14-2004, 12:20 PM
Ooh! Dyin! thanks for this info. Now you've got me thinking about breaking out all my encaustic tools (Enkaustikos brand) and try 'em out with my OPs. Not sure why I never thought to do that before but you make it sound real fun.

p.s. I like the tulips :)

Dyin
04-14-2004, 12:30 PM
cool :cool: ...remember they'll melt like butter and the results will change from piece to piece...please share what you discover and show us too!

shadowcats
05-21-2004, 02:23 AM
i like the technique you ve used i m going to try it ,and as for an encaustic heating tool
check out your thrift or second hand store for a
small travel iron , the smallest one you can find
they have them on ebay too, i just got a small adjustable temperture iron used for this purpose
and they have a few others listed in painting under other painting items, and i think you could probley find one quite cheaply without having to go broke buying a professional one, so good luck on your search,
sharon
ps
just make sure your iron is flat based an doesnt have the steam holes .

Dyin
05-21-2004, 09:51 AM
i like the technique you ve used i m going to try it ,and as for an encaustic heating tool
check out your thrift or second hand store for a
small travel iron , the smallest one you can find
they have them on ebay too, i just got a small adjustable temperture iron used for this purpose
and they have a few others listed in painting under other painting items, and i think you could probley find one quite cheaply without having to go broke buying a professional one, so good luck on your search,
sharon
ps
just make sure your iron is flat based an doesnt have the steam holes .
Hi Sharon! Welcome to the OP studio! That's a great idea. I actually have an iron buried somewhere...a travel one...I hope you'll share your results with us!

KAPnkrunch
05-22-2004, 07:14 PM
this sounds like a good idea, heating pastels. i have some cheapo pastels, and i took one of them and placed it close to my stove's burner and kept it over the fire for a few seconds, then I ran it across some canson paper, ahhh, smooth like butta'. ive never tried senneliers, but I can imagine they would feel like this, being that everyone says they are gooey. when it gets hot one day, im gonna leave my pastels out in my backyard and paint w/ them.

Dyin
05-22-2004, 07:38 PM
this sounds like a good idea, heating pastels. i have some cheapo pastels, and i took one of them and placed it close to my stove's burner and kept it over the fire for a few seconds, then I ran it across some canson paper, ahhh, smooth like butta'. ive never tried senneliers, but I can imagine they would feel like this, being that everyone says they are gooey. when it gets hot one day, im gonna leave my pastels out in my backyard and paint w/ them.

Welcome to the forum! It's a great thing for the cheapies cuz it eats em right up. The Senneliers aren't quite that gooey, a little tackier. Hope we'll see more of you and if you ever get a hot day in the Bay area you can share your backyard adventure too :p

Ead
06-01-2004, 11:39 AM
After reading about this interesting heat technique, I shaved some color and tried to heat the OPs in 2 different ways. So here is what I’ve found.

1. Since I don’t feel like heating up my oven so I put those color flakes on a sheet of wax paper and put it in a microwave. Heat for 1 minute, stop in between for a total of 3 minutes, nothing had happened. The little flakes were still rigid. So I quitted.

2. I carried the same sheet of wax paper with tiny color flakes, laid a watercolor paper on top, then flipped it around so the wax paper is now on top. Set an iron to number 3 out of the 6 level, after the first press as fast as blinking your eyes, all the flakes dissolved and were absorbed completely and laid nicely on the paper as the sample shown. The only thing that worried me is I’ve seen a trace of wax left on the paper so maybe next time I will replace wax paper with foil. What would you think?

Ead

Dyin
06-01-2004, 01:36 PM
Oh, I like how this turned out very much! I wonder if you put a little oil on the wax paper if it would not stick. If you try the foil, then I'd also oil it, but that could be neat if you made some creases and crumples in the foil...that pattern would probably transfer to the final piece. I'm glad to see you having so much fun with the OPs! Next time you do one, start a new thread so everyone can see it!

steven
10-26-2004, 12:11 PM
Thought I'd vote here and bump this up since I was using a technique similar to what Sue describes here.

My experiments with a variety of techniques sofar tend to turn out quite well and are a lot of fun - so I voted for 'Very Well - Can't wait to do more'.

Dyin
10-26-2004, 07:20 PM
lol...I forgot there even was a poll with this! This is from back in the day when oilies were mixed in with the softies on one forum. Was a lot harder to get OP info then.

Pat Isaac
10-27-2004, 06:48 PM
Tried someting like this once in a monoprint process. Drawing on a warm plate and then running it through a press. Here is the result. It is straight B&W, was fun to do, but the printing process is not for me. It is always good to try different things. :D I love your tulips, Sue and they are very different from what you do, but they have an immediacy to them that is very nice.
Pat

Dyin
10-27-2004, 07:03 PM
oooh, those came out really cool! Yeah, quite different, but they really are one of the boldest colored pieces of all the OPs I have done and it's nice to know I can 'break out' once in awhile! Have you thought of doing this one in color the regular OP way??? It's a real nice set of sunflower heads :)


did you try to post this an hour or so ago??? I saw that somehow it got bumped but my post was yesterday...had me really scratching my head! :p

steven
10-28-2004, 06:34 AM
oooh, those came out really cool! Yeah, quite different, but they really are one of the boldest colored pieces of all the OPs I have done and it's nice to know I can 'break out' once in awhile! Have you thought of doing this one in color the regular OP way??? It's a real nice set of sunflower heads :)


did you try to post this an hour or so ago??? I saw that somehow it got bumped but my post was yesterday...had me really scratching my head! :p

Cool monoprint! :cool:

Sue, it bumps to the top when someone answers the poll, even if he/she doesn't post.

Pat Isaac
10-28-2004, 09:47 AM
Don't remember, Sue. Sometime before the GAME!!!! :clap: :clap: They won. The Red Sox that is....I haven't thought about doing it in color. I have a hard time doing a piece a second time and I've tried... :( Pat

Dyin
10-28-2004, 10:04 AM
oh...wow...missed that...the curse is broken!!! They sure earned it. I can't go back either, but suppose going forward is not a bad thing :p

Thanks, Steven...should've realized that!

steven
11-01-2004, 04:27 PM
Took the liberty of rating this thread :p I think this description of the technique would be a nice addition to the Library :)

Dyin
11-01-2004, 08:03 PM
:) thanks, Steven!

tubbekans
04-08-2005, 06:59 AM
Oh, this is the thread Dyin started that got me interested in heating oil pastels. I knew it was around here somewhere and actually found it and did the poll too. I voted for experiments are going fine, or whatever the top choice was. Thanks Dyin, great ideas :clap: !

tubbekans
04-12-2005, 11:27 PM
Hi all,
I noticed that this thread keeps popping up to the top, even though there are no new posts. I think it may be doing this because of some feature to do with polls? Maybe every time it is viewed it pops up as new? Well, that's all I can figure, cause I know I haven't been looking at it or posting in it every few hours :cat: Just thought I would mention this, because it appears I am posting in it it very often but I ain't doing it. Except now of course. Oops. I am not really sure why it keeps popping back to the top saying I was last poster. It's being doing that for a few days, I am confused. It has been 4 days since I last posted in this thread, until now. Hmmm, I don't get it.

Unbridled
02-17-2008, 01:14 PM
Hi, and I'm thrilled with all the info to be picked up here. My experience with heating oil pastels is this:
I applied several colors heavily to a gessoed canvas and heated an encaustic iron slightly. I ironed the pastel to blend and smooth out the colors. I got a great effect. Then later I found that the oil pastel, once heated, became brittle and flaked off in patches. Not good. I also have tried warming the oil pastels in a bread warmer, but the outsides in touch with the warmer surface melted too much and made a mess. Does anyone know of a very gentle warmer for cold days in the studio? In summer, I have to keep my studio several degrees cooler than the rest of the house or else the oil pastels are just too soft.
Comments? You can see my work at littlehouseart.com.
Louise

Pat Isaac
02-17-2008, 01:50 PM
Welcome...:wave: Do you have a small electric heater that you could turn on in the area of your pastels? that might warm them up just enough.
Beautiful work on your site. What kind of OPs do you use?

Pat

Peiwend
02-17-2008, 02:11 PM
Hi Louise, I use a hair dryer to warm them up a bit for blending and put the painting in an unheated room or the fridge to cool them down a bit for layering.

__________________________Wendell

LJW
02-17-2008, 03:45 PM
Hi, Louise, and welcome to the OP Forum. I happen to have my small spare-bedroom studio arranged such that my OP trays are right above my electric baseboard heating unit, and that keeps them from getting too cold in the winter. I like your horse and farm paintings. I was wondering whether you coat your foam board with anything? Jane

Chloe_1
06-29-2008, 11:31 AM
I've tried monoprints techniques on fiberglass with various mediums.
I sanded down my fiberglass,and applied a layer of Gum arabic all over.
I paint on the fiberglass, and when I am ready I do my transfer on printing paper like rives, somerset, or Arches vellum.

Watersoluble oil pastels work very well. I do not melt them; but what I do is spray my painting on fiberglass with water when my painting is done, then place my printing paper on top and burnish it with a spoon.

It's really fun!

Londondeon
02-02-2009, 11:07 AM
"Does anyone know of apparatus for grilling/baking with a totally flat metal surface and adjustable heat?
Or does anyone have alternative ideas for encaustic techniques?
This could open up a lot of new possibilities for painting with oilpastels and waxcrayons.

Dick"

I use a large electric griddle with teflon surface for the oil pastels and encaustics. It is 14 x 15". I can mix colors right on the surface and pick them up with a bursh and paint them on the surface or I can heat in small metal containers and paint from that. Or I can paint on the surface with lit set on low heat with the op and then press the paper onto it.

I have used oil pastels in encaustic, drawing right on the wax, but if you are careful you can also use it on 300# paper and quickly hit it with the heat gun or blow torch being careful not to scorch the paper. A hair dryer was not hot enough for me. Then move it around with the brush or palette knife. I think the paper looks and works best if you have used a thin coating of wax to prime the surface of the paper because the oil pastel moves around more easily and doesn't suck right into the paper and stain it as quickly. You can also scratch back into the soft op to get a linear design.

The paper can also be set directly onto the griddle surface set on low and when warm you can draw right on the warm paper. Watch for overheating, heavy paper is best.
Londondeon

Dory L
03-25-2009, 07:14 PM
Love the colors in this

benjaminshr
11-16-2009, 11:50 PM
Hi,
I've found oil pastels more difficult to work with than soft pastels--they function more like crayons and you can't really blend much. Personally, for drawing, I prefer charcoal with some gray pastels. As for other supplies--pencils are pencils; use whatever lead works the best for you. I've had experience with oil paints and really enjoyed it--they take forever to dry, so they're easier to mix than acrylics, although this can cause problems with actually painting--you have to be patient. I've not really enjoyed my experiences with watercolors, but I'm not really much of a 2D person, anyway.

Lostjedi
04-10-2013, 07:58 PM
:crossfingers:

Here is an experiment using this technique. I did it using a hot pan, cheap oil pastels, and aluminum foil in a heat transfer technique I read about in one of the forms. While not the easiest way to paint it does give a free impressionistic feeling to the painting.

Let me know what you think about these trees.

vltz
04-11-2013, 12:00 PM
Has anyone tried working with OP using an Icarus Drawing Board?
http://esterroi.com/technique/

Flycatcher10
06-10-2013, 12:37 PM
Hi Vltz, I haven't tried the Icarus Drawing Board technique - maybe someone else has given the board a try.