PDA

View Full Version : brushes & strokes, how to?


leesmith
03-30-2001, 07:39 PM
I always freak on landcapes. To me, they are the most difficult to do but I would like to try. Can some of you tell me what kind/size of brushes do you most often use for land masses, foliage rocks etc? How do you develop your stroke work? Push, pull, dab, etc.??? Do you work from background, mid, fore or the reverse? Any tips are appreciated. Thanks!

Lee

LarrySeiler
03-31-2001, 04:15 PM
If you check out my Artsmentor.Org site, Lee, and go to my instructionals and demo page, I have about eight of my how-to lessons I have done over the past couple years here on Wetcanvas... http://www.artsmentor.org

Check out my latest, a "Roadside Masterpiece"

There are a good number of photos with detailed explanations to follow along with, both in oil and acrylic mediums.

Larry

------------------
The Artsmentor

"Painting is easy when you don't know how, but very difficult when you do!" Edgar Degas

leesmith
03-31-2001, 06:23 PM
Thanks everybody for the response.

To Larry, thanks for the link, I will check those out; I've seen your work at Artnation, and I am very impressed with your style. I've seen too much of the "Bob Ross" look in landscapes in my area; not enough variety in strokework and then I've seen styles that are too abstracted for my taste. Yours are very real yet the brushwork is so expressive.

ArtyHelen
04-01-2001, 12:19 AM
Sorry I can't help, Lee, but I just wanted to say I'm glad you've asked this question!

I'm just doing an acrylic portrait with a field and square cut bush in the background. My grass has ended up looking like camouflage army clothing, and my bushes look like geometric boxes with dots on!! LOL! http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif I'm so ashamed that I've produced the type of painting I've seen at car boot sales, that no-one looks twice at! LOL!

I don't know how people get the foliage to look loose and bitty... mine is way too solid.

So thanx for asking this, 'cause I'll be checking back too! http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

Helen

------------------
Visit me!
http://pencilartist.50megs.com

Pray
04-01-2001, 12:44 AM
Me too Helen. My trees and bushes just look like multicolored blobs. There are instructions on sight but they're for watercolor. When I get to feeling better I'm gonna try a tip I saw on doing sea foam in acrylic (here at WC instruction). It said to work a piece of kneaded erase down to the ferrel(sp) of an old brush and let it hang over night. I've been thinking it might work for airy trees. I think foilage is the absolute hardest thing to paint and I just hate that cause I love doing skys and I'm tired of painting my usual water under them. I also saw that a sea sponge might work. It tried it and it worked OK with thinned out acrylic but I need my oil thick so no go there.

Hope there are some good responses here. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

Happy painting.

------------------
------------
Pat

LDianeJohnson
04-01-2001, 02:58 PM
Hi Lee,

The very best way is to test the different brush types to see what effects you can create, what they will and won't do. Test them from horizontal to perpendicular, with thick and thin paint, with/without medium, small and large sizes, etc.

Older, used brushes are particularly good for certain effects especially if you don't want to achieve a "plastic" look.

I use a number of filberts when doing landscapes as they can give me soft rounded shapes as well as linear ones. Have you tried one of these?

Also, I suggest working with the largest brush possible when starting your painting, working down to the smallest size you need for the level of detail you wish to include. If you start with little ones, it can give a very crisp, cold appearance to your piece and take forever to cover the canvas.

Here is a brief article I did about

<A HREF="http://www.wetcanvas.com/ArtSchool/Landscapes/PleinAir/">"Building" Your Plein Air Painting</a>

which describes one process of paint application for a landscape.


Diane

------------------
L. Diane Johnson (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/) NAPA, PSA
Plein Air Workshops (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/workshops/)

tammy
04-02-2001, 10:51 AM
Originally posted by Artistry:

Older, used brushes are particularly good for certain effects especially if you don't want to achieve a "plastic" look.

I use a number of filberts when doing landscapes as they can give me soft rounded shapes as well as linear ones. Have you tried one of these?



ooo, I love using these too. A filbert as well as brights are my best brushes for this I think. A knife works well for the treatment of the bark and highlights on it.
I haven't tried it yet, but someone suggested using the tip of an actual tree branch with color on it to make the twigs!



------------------
Don't worry, its gonna be all right....
Tammy's Home for Artists (http://tammy.artistnation.com)