PDA

View Full Version : Flying with a french easel


Robert
12-31-2000, 06:17 PM
Has anyone carried a french easel on a commercial airline? Any ideas about packing paints, bottles, etc., in so that they don't squish or break? Is it better to check it to baggage? Or is it better to ship it ahead through something like Fedex or UPS?
Appreciate any advice that's out there!

dj-tps
12-31-2000, 08:15 PM
Have not travelled by air with one. But have heard it is better to have it in your carry on luggage. Get one of those carry-on pieces with rollers like the stewardesses use; just big enough for your easel. The checked baggege gets handled pretty roughly, and I've heard of others having their easel damaged. Be advised that they will not allow solvents aboard; that you will have to purchase at your destination. Shipping your supplies ahead is a good choice too. Be sure you do it in ample time so delays will not disrupt your painting schedule. Another problem, if you will be traveling overseas, is with customs. I've heard of artists being charged import/export duties on their finished paintings when they return. How does everyone handle that issue?

paintfool
01-01-2001, 01:09 PM
Robert, you mat want to check with the airlines on this one. They can be 'funny' about taking certain art supplies on board at all. Llis went to Giverny last year & was unable to take her oils because they can be considered flamable. You'd probably be better off sending them on ahead.
Cheryl

------------------
paintfool

Robert
01-01-2001, 03:03 PM
Thanks! It seems like shipping the paints, etc., ahead is the most worry free way to go. Not much trouble carrying an easel aboard if there's nothing in it.

LDianeJohnson
01-04-2001, 03:44 PM
Robert,
I have traveled abroad with many types of easels both as check-in and carry-on with no problems. With the larger wooden easels, I usually purchase a good suitcase just for that plus a few other supplies and pre-line the case with foam for extra protection, particularly the corners. After doing this many times I have now streamlined my packing to the smallest, most compact easel possible. Pack what you can in the portable easel to save space. Just watch the weight. Each airline has a different weight limit which they keep lowering so you can't take as much.

Some of the things I include whether taking oil or acrylic are, spray bottle, lots of plastic grocery bags for trash (you can carry lots of these as they compress well and are virtually weightless), tube of pre-cut canvas, a few sizes of stretchers, portable staple gun, sun screen, inexpensive raincoat (2/$1 from the Dollar Store), small rain umbrella, tiny pack stool, 2 plastic water bottles (for carrying clean water), 1 bottle of drinking water, a couple of food bars, cap, tiny flashlight, maps, paper towels, mirror (to check work in the field), and business cards. All fits neatly in a small roll away tote that can double as a backpack.

When painting in pastel, I do the same as above (minus the canvas, stretchers), take a baggie with wet rag inside for easy wash-up, latex-free gloves and baby powder (to put on your hands before inserting into gloves--keeps moisture down), GatorBoard with bull-dog clips and rubber bands as a rigid surface, Canson paper or hand-made museum board surface for painting on.

Take only what you'll need. Most countries have an art supply store if you need to replenish anything.

Diane

------------------
2001 L. Diane Johnson Plein Air Workshops (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/workshops)

Robert
01-05-2001, 11:43 AM
Thank you, Diane. It's information worth saving!

LDianeJohnson
01-05-2001, 01:55 PM
You're welcome http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif
So glad it was of help!

------------------
2001 L. Diane Johnson Plein Air Workshops (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/workshops)