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J.Dillon
03-26-2001, 07:01 AM
Looking to get a digital camera.

I need to do close ups less then one foot. I would also like the camera to shoot when the shutter is pressed no lag between taking the image and clicking it. A flash would be nice as well as some control over the settings as in a conventional camera. Sharp images a must. Also in the 200 buck price range. Is there such a camera ?? Thanks

JD

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JFD

RickLee
03-30-2001, 09:19 AM
JD... in 4 days you haven't received a reply. I think I know why. Your wish is a little optimistic. You're probably going to need to spend between 600 and 1000 dollars to get the camera you want. For 200 bucks you're not going to get anything like those specs. Even an expensive non-pro digital camera will have some lag time for getting the shot. You could spend around 2 or 3 thousand for a camera that would really do all that.

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Rick Lee
www.rickleephoto.com
Instant Messenger ID: RickLeeFS

JeffG
03-30-2001, 09:42 AM
Originally posted by J.Dillon:
Looking to get a digital camera.

I need to do close ups less then one foot. I would also like the camera to shoot when the shutter is pressed no lag between taking the image and clicking it. A flash would be nice as well as some control over the settings as in a conventional camera. Sharp images a must. Also in the 200 buck price range. Is there such a camera ?? Thanks

JD



I concur with Rick Lee. I recently did some looking as well, and Flash and sharp image seems to be the norm in most models. Except for the very high end (5k or so) you're not going to find tight macro lens capability or exposure\f stop settings as with an SLR. And $200 or below isn't going to get you alot of anything.

Whatever you decide to get, I'd suggest thinking outside the paradigm for the focus & control issues. Get yourself a mid-range camera and a full version of Adobe Photoshop. With a decent pixel resolution, you can edit your image in photoshop and zoom in on an area to simulate the 1-foot focus. Then use the filters and tools to sharpen, dodge, burn and adjust levels that you'd normally get from exposure settings on a good SLR.



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Jeff G.

J.Dillon
03-31-2001, 02:39 PM
Thanks , Rick Lee and Jeff.
I guess ignorance is not bliss. I have to face up to reality in the digital world. What I want is certinally not available at present but down the road a few years... who knows. Does any body rember how big the first computers were? Big as a room and not the capacity of any on the market today. Things change fast.

The tip about the photo shop sounds like a good idea. I think I will focus on that solution and stick to my 35 SLR conventional camera.

JD

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JFD

Michael2
04-27-2001, 05:49 PM
I recommend the Sony DSC-S75 at $699. It is due out in the U.S. the first week in June. It looks like it will be the best digital camera you can buy for a mere $700. It has a Carl Zeiss lens.

I don't know about the macro stuff.

Kevin M
04-28-2001, 06:33 PM
I recently purchased the Canon Powershot G1 (3.3 megapixel). I wanted an in-your-pocket camera with near-professional output. The G1 has not disappointed me, it has lots of pros and very few cons.
Apart from its excellent picture quality it gives great personal control including RAW format which is a true digital negative that you can tweak to suit your needs.
It is not inexpensive at about $800 but given its overall performance it is certainly value for money.

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Michael2
05-04-2001, 05:18 PM
The G1 has bad problems with chromatic aberration, noticeable as a purple fringe around high contrast areas. In fact, you can see some of the purple fringes in the pictures posted here.

The Sony DSC-S75 will be better in this department because of the higher quality Carl Zeiss lens. But it still won't be perfect. The digital cameras show a lot more chromatic aberration than regular film cameras.

Michael2
05-07-2001, 07:35 PM
This blowup of the picture above clearly shows the chromatic aberration:

<IMG SRC="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-May-2001/ca3.jpg" border=0>

[This message has been edited by Michael (edited May 07, 2001).]

Kevin M
05-08-2001, 09:10 AM
Hi Michael,

You are indeed correct about the G1 and chromatic aberration in high contrast boundaries. I was aware of this when I had the camera out on trial. However this is also apparent in the Sony DSC-s75 http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/sonydscs75/page12.asp and the probable explanation for this is the similarity of the lens type used in both cameras which is amply illustrated on page one of the same review.


Having said that, the just emerging s75 produces remarkably sharp and true images due to its internal processing wizardry and given that it is $100 cheaper than the G1 it is bound to be a winner.


Kevin

TPS
05-21-2001, 10:49 PM
Not sure buying the full version of Photoshop is going to save you any money, since it goes for $600. Better to put that money into a mid level camera. There are many photo editor programs you can get for far less which will do what you will likely need. In fact, one will come with the camera. Unless you will be needing Photoshop to interact with the trade, which of course would make it manditory.

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