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View Full Version : Wedding portraits...by windowlight.


vonorloff
02-10-2001, 04:30 PM
<IMG SRC="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/lib/10-Feb-2001/Window_light_bride.jpg300.jpg" border=0>

Here is a window light bridal portrait I made some years ago ... when I used to shoot weddings.

Window light can be an excellent light source on location for 'environmentals.' Especially when the weather is cold or raining outside, as in the case of this portrait, entitled December Bride. Being able to shoot indoors with 'natural' lighting from the window opened up many more possibilities for fine, tastefull portraits of the bride. We also made portraits with the groom and bride together at the same window.

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VonOrloff

"...all I thought of was making my colors sing, without paying any heed to rules and regulations"
Henri Matisse

TeAnne
02-11-2001, 04:29 PM
Very nice indeed http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

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vonorloff
02-12-2001, 11:57 AM
I'm sensing there isnt much interest in portrait or wedding photography here. If I'm wrong, please let me know. No sense posting items or information on that subject otherwise.

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VonOrloff

"...all I thought of was making my colors sing, without paying any heed to rules and regulations"
Henri Matisse

spectru
02-12-2001, 06:46 PM
While my interest is not with wedding photos, I certainly am interested in using widow light. I just hadn't gotten around to responding.


In your example wedding portrait, the interior is well exposed, so I assume you were using fast film and/or long exposure. The entire image is within your depth of field, so I assume wide angle lense and/or small aperture.

Indoor photos are why they put pop-up flashes on point-and-shoot cameras.
I almost always use flash for indoor shooting. If I'm not using my P&S, it's most likely bounced flash. I also usually consider my indoor photos to be snapshots, not portraits.

I'd like to expand my horizons. How about sharing the technical details and perhaps a little narrative on how to do this right.

vonorloff
02-12-2001, 08:50 PM
Originally posted by spectru:
While my interest is not with wedding photos, I certainly am interested in using widow light. I just hadn't gotten around to responding.

Yes, I've used windowlight for non wedding portraits as well.


In your example wedding portrait, the interior is well exposed, so I assume you were using fast film and/or long exposure. The entire image is within your depth of field, so I assume wide angle lense and/or small aperture.

I usually shoot film with a speed of 400 when doing location work. As for the above photograph, I did use a 50mm wide angle lens on my Bronica SQ AM. But the focal length of the lens could vary .... I've shot similar situations with my 80mm normal lens, and even with my 150mm portrait lens when I was doing closeups or if I wanted to compress the perspective from a distance.


Indoor photos are why they put pop-up flashes on point-and-shoot cameras.
I almost always use flash for indoor shooting. If I'm not using my P&S, it's most likely bounced flash. I also usually consider my indoor photos to be snapshots, not portraits.

To discuss lighting properly, I will have to take a little more time. But its not complicated, really. I will compose another post here for you very soon on that subject, if you like. You like?

I'd like to expand my horizons. How about sharing the technical details and perhaps a little narrative on how to do this right.



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VonOrloff

"...all I thought of was making my colors sing, without paying any heed to rules and regulations"
Henri Matisse

-paul-
02-13-2001, 02:21 AM
b]To discuss lighting properly, I will have to take a little more time. But its not complicated, really. I will compose another post here for you very soon on that subject, if you like. You like?[/b]

I like.......

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now, whether one choses to be referred to as one or not is another story...

spectru
02-13-2001, 08:16 AM
Yes, I like. Please continue.

I haven't used 400 speed film in a long time because I wanted finer grain. I tried Kodachrome 200 when it first appeared, and returned to my Fujichrome 100. I would rather lose the speed to gain the sharpness. There are new fast films available now that I have not tried. Do yo have recommendations?

vonorloff
02-13-2001, 10:44 AM
Originally posted by spectru:
Yes, I like. Please continue.

I haven't used 400 speed film in a long time because I wanted finer grain. I tried Kodachrome 200 when it first appeared, and returned to my Fujichrome 100. I would rather lose the speed to gain the sharpness. There are new fast films available now that I have not tried. Do yo have recommendations?


For medium format, I have been using Kodak VC for portraits. They do have a 400 and an 800 film now which maintains a tight grain structure all the way up to 30x40 prints. That's as large as I ever need to go.

What is your subject, usually ... and are you shooting on 35mm or on a larger format camera?

note: I will start another 'string' on the subject of windowlight, since you guys are both interested.


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VonOrloff

"...all I thought of was making my colors sing, without paying any heed to rules and regulations"
Henri Matisse

spectru
02-13-2001, 09:49 PM
vonorloff: "What is your subject, usually ... and are you shooting on 35mm or on a larger format camera?"


I shoot a lot of macro. Butterflies are a favorite subject. This is one I am particularly pleased with.

<IMG SRC="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/lib/13-Feb-2001/GulfFritilary(a).JPG" border=0>

A far cry from wedding photography, as you can see. I also shoot larger wildlife, birds mostly.

I use Nikon 35mm. Macro and telephoto lenses. I don't even have a normal lens - use the 55mm micro-nikkor for that.

As I said before, I have been using Fujichrome 100 Sensia for a long time. I just bought 10 rolls of Provia 100 to give that a try.

I am an amateur on a tight budget. Little by little, I am trying to acquire good equipment.

I am comfortable shooting wildlife - I mean, I pretty much know how what I see through the viewfinder is going to look on film. I want to learn architectural, scenics, portraits, and black & white.

There - enough auto-biography. Now over to read your introduction to window lighting.

spectru

vonorloff
02-13-2001, 10:07 PM
Spectru
Great Monarch shot.....the colors really kick.

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VonOrloff

spectru
02-13-2001, 10:51 PM
Thanks vonorloff.

That's one of the things I like about Fujichrome. It's more saturated than Kodachrome, especially the greens. There's a lot of green in nature photography. Kodachrome is supposed to be more accurate but it seems to me to gives greys and beiges a bluish or purplish cast.

vonorloff
02-14-2001, 10:16 AM
Yes, Fujichrome is definitely more saturated. I used to shoot a lot of Sensia. Ive been told that its the same basic thing as Provia, but Provia costs more. Ill be interested in hearing if you see any difference between them. By the way, I used to find the best price on Sensia at Costco. You might want to check them out.

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VonOrloff

tammy
02-16-2001, 10:37 PM
I love the windowlight Bride, has such warmth that it's almost comforting and elegant.

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