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rapolina
05-16-2003, 05:32 AM
what type of paper do you prefer? rough or hot pressed or cold pressed?

i istinctively prefer rough, i nearly always bought this type, but last time i find only hot pressed one and i tried it: i feel as the painting "slips" better, giving a more fluid and loose effect.

what is your opinion?

ciao, rapolina.

coffee_girl3000
05-16-2003, 05:43 AM
I voted cold press...hahah, but only because I haven't tried any other. Rough is too expensive and I thought HP was best for really detailed stuff, which isn't my thing. I suppose CP varies so much from brand to brand that I've pretty much tried it all.

artmom
05-16-2003, 05:50 AM
I use both 140 and 300 lb cold pressed. I truthfully haven't tried hot pressed or rough. I like to paint so many different kinds of images that I thought the cold pressed would hit a happy medium.

madmum
05-16-2003, 05:54 AM
Originally posted by coffee_girl3000
Rough is too expensive

:confused:

I buy full sheets of Arches in CP and rough, both same price! Maybe it's the pads of rough which are expensive? That's probably because it isn't as popular!

I like cold pressed for detailed work or anything which needs to look shiny and smooth. Rough is great for landscapes and stone etc.

Ruth

coffee_girl3000
05-16-2003, 06:01 AM
Originally posted by madmum


:confused:

I buy full sheets of Arches in CP and rough, both same price! Maybe it's the pads of rough which are expensive? That's probably because it isn't as popular!

Ruth

Really? In my art shop, I'm pretty sure that they are all different prices. Mind you, Arches is so expensive I can't buy it whatever texture it is :(. I do like the Saunders that I have at the moment, and www.handprint.com rechons it is the best mouldmade paper.

mpopinz
05-16-2003, 07:18 AM
I use Arches 140# cold & hot press. The hot press has such a fine finish!.. Cold press handles the paint so well. I purchased a sample pack and just like them all.

Curious to use the 300# paper.

When purchased in a roll, how wide is it? Is it small enough for a paper cutter? or ruler & scissors?

CharM
05-16-2003, 07:29 AM
When I started painting in watercolour, last year, I attended a few all-day workshops... My teacher provided all our materials which included Arches 300 lb. cp.... She obvsiously knew what she was doing, because our paintings were really nice... Then, I purchased some Strathmore 11x15 140 lb. cp pads... They were ok. When I did Nandie's portrait, I bought a 9x12 block of Strathmore cp... I hate it. It isn't sized properly and I really had trouble with two of my florals...

I took advantage of an offer that Mary-Ann mentioned at Curry's... I now have an Arches 140 cp 10x14 block and some Winsor & Newton full sheets... I have started a new painting on my Arches and I'm very pleased...

sisangel
05-16-2003, 08:05 AM
I prefer rough and it works great for me on landscapes, which is what I like to do best. I have used all of the pad that I originally bought. I am looking for a source for good prices on rough, preferably Arches. I'll check into the sheets.

The other day I ordered a block of Arches 10 x 14 300 gr. I must have been in a daze then because I realized I had ordered HP and it's already been shipped. I have been wanting to do ink & watercolor and oil pastel & watercolor so I will try the hp on those and see how I like it.

This is an interesting thread.

Bonnie :D

mchew
05-16-2003, 08:26 AM
I use Rough almost everytime... have had great success with Terschelling 140lb/300 gsm.. I've done some research on it but not much info about this paper on the Net.

It's made in Holland by a paper mill called Schut... but it's not cotton made like those more expensive paper eg. Arches. Terschelling is 100% acid-free woodfree cellulose paper and it works best if you don't do too many layers of glazing and don't scrub a lot. But it is great for lifting paint and doing correction as it does not absorb paint as much as cotton-made paper.

It says on the back of the block "suitable for both student and professional artists... this statement sort of implies that it's student quality as it cost only about 1/3 what Arches costs.

I've also tried Saunders and Arches... both rough and like them too.

magnuscanis
05-16-2003, 08:29 AM
So far I've mostly used cold pressed, but I did enjoy having a go with rough one time. I've got a couple of sheets of hot pressed to try as well, when I get round to it.

Actually, when I started off I worked mostly on cartridge paper, and I still do quite a lot of my watercolour work in my sketchbook (which is med. weight cartridge). It's certainly not as nice as proper watercolour paper for serious painting but it can work ok.

I'm sure a lot could be said for choosing one type of paper and learning its properties intimately, but I've always been much more inclined to experiment with different stuff.

Uschi
05-16-2003, 08:37 AM
Definitely cold pressed. That's how I started out. I have tried hot pressed - not for me, have never tried the rough or 300 because I paint very little landscape.

I use the Winsor Newton 140 CP. It is a wonderful paper, cheaper than Arches and doesn't feel so cardboardy.
Uschi

matingara
05-16-2003, 08:47 AM
I am a rough sort of guy. I almost always get Arches Aquarelle 300GSM (is this 140#???) rough. It is much "whiter" than Saunders. It is also easy to work and scrub when necessary.

Having said that, I have experimented with NOT, HP and even Illustration Board.

One of my favorite paintings of last year was done on HP(This one here) (http://www.art-agent.com/details.php?piece_id=300)

HP does wonderful things when you are floating and spraying and throwing paint. (So do Rough and NOT).

DaZZer
05-16-2003, 12:21 PM
I've always used A3 300lb cold pressed paper from a pad. The reason I use a heavy paper is because i don't know how to stretch it - instead i just tend to squash the paper in a frame to flatten it ..:D .
I've been commissioned to a Spanish landscape but they wanted a large painting so i bought an A1 300lb Rough sheet - cost nearly 6 for just the one! looking forward trying it out but i think i might have to buy watercolour in tube form first, because i don't think i will be able to mix up enough paint with pans.:

prairie painter
05-16-2003, 02:24 PM
I've used CP for quite awhile, though my earliest flower paintings are on handmade paper made by local craft people- they were very nice, but being highly acidic, are now rather awful.
I've been trying to find a paper that will work well with my favorite way of working, pen and wash, and have been advised to use plate bristol- yipe, I'd as soon use Yupo! So my paper choice is for sure a WIP.

wayfarer
05-16-2003, 05:59 PM
I'd have to say cold press, for the most part. Depends on the brand. Fabriano Uno cold press is very different from Arches. Arches is my tried and true though. I do like Lanaquarelle hot press though. Fun to use. I've started with rough, but again, brand makes a HUGE difference. Arches rough is very rough on a roughness scale, I've found.

Chris

shirleyq
05-16-2003, 06:35 PM
I voted cp I think, but meant to hit hp:rolleyes: Actually I like it all depending on what I am painting. Arches smells bad when it is wet. Does anyone know why? I have used a printmakers paper by Reves (?) which I really liked. It is very smooth and the colors flow very well. I wouldn't give you two cents for Strathmore papers!:evil: :evil: aswexpress.com has paper for a fraction of what I can get it in the art stores.....nice people too. Handmade papers are a different animal but fun to experiment on.

Rod
05-16-2003, 07:17 PM
I use mainly rough or CP (not) as I enjoy the surface for producing texture with the side of my brush.

The other determining factor is the absorbancy, I hate paper that acts like blotting paper. I find saunders 300 is a good paper.

The price should only vary with the weight of the paper ,

Rod.

Strawberry Wine
05-16-2003, 08:40 PM
Good Paper Poll Rapolina

Sarah wrote"I voted cold press...hahah, but only because I haven't tried any other".

I am with you there Sarah!

I can get full sheets of paper close to where I live. Arches 140 CP for $8.50 a sheet and Bockingford (sp?) 140 lb C.P for $4.00 a sheet.

Can anyone tell me the dfference in paper quality between the 2

Gail

Strawberry Wine
05-17-2003, 08:20 AM
Me again. I just tried a still life on very very cheap paper I bought for practicing on. It worked pretty well until I tried to paint a wet into wet background. The paper absorbed too much paint in some areas that left splotches of unintended colour.

Lesson Learned. Never buy the really cheap stuff.

Gail

wayfarer
05-17-2003, 10:36 AM
Another thing I noticed is how differently brands of paper handle masking fluid. My experience has been that with Arches, you better get it off soon after you mask otherwise you're going to have a time of it. Even more so with Lanaquarelle, though the time you can leave it on seems even shorter! Fabriano Uno, however, seems to tolerate it very well. I've left masking on for a week+ and have had it come off ever so easy from this paper. Just an observation.

Chris

karenjh
05-17-2003, 06:25 PM
I use both hot press and cold press - depends on what I want to achieve. I find hot press a bit more difficult to work with at times, but love the end results.

lyn lynch
05-19-2003, 02:39 AM
I have only been working one year. I started w/140# Arches CP because that is what the craft store had and I had a % off coupon. Then, I purchased 300# CP Arches from click here for link to cheap joe's for best US prices (http://www.cheapjoes.com) and I like it very much because it is so thick and doesn't buckle. But, I bought full sheets which I rarely use. I also bought 300# Kilimanjaro [cheapjoes house brand] and like it very much. It's white like Arches Bright White, which I prefer, and cheaper than Arches.

I bought a block of Canson 140# and it is poopy cheap student grade, imo. I made the Rod project portrait on it and totally lost my detailing as the paper acts like a Yupo--a slick sheet.

I have not tried HP because it feels too slick for how I like to paint--another Yupo type feel.

I just purchased some sheets of 140# rough, but unfortunately could get only Strathmore. I wanted to try it because Rod showed such nice result in the portrait he did of Lulu. I have not tried it yet, though.

pampe
05-22-2003, 03:02 PM
I cannot manage HOT PRESS


I use CP exclusively : Arches 140, Fabriano 140 and Kilamanjaro 300

Gia
05-22-2003, 03:57 PM
I use mostly arches 140 cp rough...even for portraits, which
is against all "rules":rolleyes: .....but I love it.

surreal
05-23-2003, 12:18 AM
I use rough and cold pressed only and almost always 300 lb paper.

I had a few bad experiences with hot press.

I usually paint over the same areas of the painting several times. In my few experiences with hot press paper, the paper began to disintegrate after several coats of paint; this doesn't occur when I use rough paper.

steven
06-21-2004, 08:42 AM
Winsor & Newton used to do enveloppes with a variety of weights and/or surfaces - I liked to experiment with them. Too bad I can't seem to find them in shops anymore :(

Strangely, I like Hot Pressed (Arches) for small studies - slippery, yes...

I like hand-made paper and my favourite is Moulin de Larroque ( http://www.artisans-d-art.com/moulin-de-larroque/index-en.htm ) :cool:

Annapet
06-21-2004, 02:18 PM
Arches CP, but I liked painting on a Fabriano/Artistico Soft Press also. I have to try more of that.

:)

Beanpainter
06-21-2004, 05:53 PM
Its funny but I was just reading www.handprint.com about 5 minutes ago concerning the different types of paper. That section is a definite reading "must". I have always used Arches. In the beginning I tried 140lb., then I read somewhere that using 300lb will improve paintings by 30%--can't remember where I read that. Anyway, I do like it because I don't stretch my paper. Also, I like to scrub and rub with a sponge...so I need something stronger. Arches sheets have not let me down, however, the blocks are a different story. I tend to use a lot of water when painting, and sometimes the paper lifts/buckles from the block. The black adhesive holding the paper sometimes doesn't hold it together. Also, the blocks don't come in 300lb weight.

NodakerDeb
06-21-2004, 07:19 PM
Its funny but I was just reading www.handprint.com about 5 minutes ago concerning the different types of paper. That section is a definite reading "must". I have always used Arches. In the beginning I tried 140lb., then I read somewhere that using 300lb will improve paintings by 30%--can't remember where I read that. Anyway, I do like it because I don't stretch my paper. Also, I like to scrub and rub with a sponge...so I need something stronger. Arches sheets have not let me down, however, the blocks are a different story. I tend to use a lot of water when painting, and sometimes the paper lifts/buckles from the block. The black adhesive holding the paper sometimes doesn't hold it together. Also, the blocks don't come in 300lb weight.

Thank you Beanpainter for writing this!. I was beginning to think I was the ONLY person in the world who had trouble (exactly as you describe) with Arches blocks. :( Not to mention, they stink to high heaven when they are wet.

The majority of people love Arches blocks, so, in conclusion, all I can say about them is that they didn't work for me... sigh.

I've not tried individual sheets of Arches, so can't say if I like them or not. I discovered Fabriano Artistico extra white soft press, and haven't looked back. I LOVE that paper, but then again, I'm not one to scrub out, scratch, or abuse my paper too much. I also don't lay large washes so I don't have trouble with it buckling.

I have also tried Strathmore Aquarius and liked it quite a bit also. It's just not a very thick paper so it loses 'something' by not being full-bodied. It doesn't buckle though!! :)

Deb

Irene Prior
06-22-2004, 01:09 PM
I use arches 300 lb sheets, but also have used 140 arches block which does buckle if it's to wet. I've also have used arches hotpress 140 and 300, it has a smooth finish and took some getting use too. Recently I've bough Carson Montval 140 coldpress block. At first I hated it, but after finally figuring out how to work with it, I love it. It has a smooth finish, so I have to be rather careful when scrubbing...I've been using the proxy brush and scrubbing rather lightly and that seems to work and doesn't ruin the paper.


Irene

JCTapper
07-11-2004, 08:40 PM
I use Arches 140 lb CP and/or Rough. I order my paper in sheets from Cheap Joe's... best deal I can find. I haven't noticed any smell, but perhaps what you are smelling is the sizing? I just ordered an Arches Block to take with me on a vacation in lieu of having to carry an easle around... have never used a block before so don't really know if I'll be happy with that idea or not! I'm sure it will buckle because I use a lot of water... then again in the heat on the road maybe I won't need to worry about that too much.

laudesan
07-14-2004, 02:06 AM
What a good poll..

Arches CP for me 140lb (300gsm)

Tried HP and oh boy did it get away on me. :rolleyes:

Tried rough love it for beach/ocean scenes..

ValC
07-15-2004, 12:20 PM
HI, from a newbie in Coos Bay OR.... been working with watercolor for about 3-4 months now, and trying out a variety of papers, was wondering if anyone has anyone had problems with Cartier Magnani Pescia 300 paper? It's supposed to be great for all water media... When I add water in any amount or even try to do the slightest scrub or remove techniques, little bits of cottonish material appear on the surface of the paper, they will brush off when dry, but is it supposed to do this? I do like the creamy dreamy way the paint on the skin tones seem to "meld" with the paper. Check out my art web site... Starting in oils, inspired by BOB ROSS (Don't groan.. it gave me confidence to progress) but now have been getting into watercolor and am confused about this expensive paper acting so strangely?? http://www.themysticalgardens.com/art.htm :confused:

vparra
09-16-2004, 09:47 PM
Hi Val, I'm very newbie watercolorist as well - have tried 3 different types of Cartiera Magnani blocks - Aquarello [cold press], Portofino [Hot Press] and finally the Pescia [all media] paper with somewhat mixed results. All are #145 lb, haven't tried their 275 lb sheet [can't afford it yet]

I really like their CP for watercolor, but the hot press and Pescia turned to disasters in my hands. I noticed a gummy residue when I tried to lift or glaze and finally gave up on those paintings I was so discouraged by the results. However, the Pescia is great for colored pencil!

I've also tried -- Strathmore : way too mechanical, but it makes for good practice/scratch paper. Arches CP : allows me to lift without damaging the surface, and the paints look so beautiful on it! Too bad it's so expensive. Bockingford is more affordable, I use that for practice paintings while saving Arches for my "masterpieces". Nujabi CP is pretty rough, but the texture is so incredible I'm inspired to paint rock and stone just to take advantage of it. All in all, I prefer CP - seems to hide my unskilled brush stroked better than hot press :)

Good luck to you!

Virginia

Pars
09-17-2004, 07:11 AM
Hi - I've been using these 6 x8 Khadi blocks for several months (recycled cotton rag, made in India). They are comfortable to carry around and I've filled up nearly 3 :)

Looks like ebay is having a great sale on sheets in Britain if anyone is interested

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=48092&item=8132171617&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW

I do all my tests in these and small sketches with watercolour and ink - haven't graduated to anything larger yet.

thetech
10-07-2004, 10:50 AM
Well I'm pretty much a newbie as well but I have tried several things almost all cold pressed and have noticed HUGE differences in the surface from the different manufacturers. What I use usually depends on what I'm trying to paint. I have Fabriano cold pressed and Strathmore and something else that I just can't recall at the momment (at work away from art supplies), but it was pretty expensive!

I also like the water color "blocks" as I can normally avoid the stretching, but I have experienced some of the same issues as others have with the papper lifting off the block anyway if you get things really wet.

Despite what some others have mentioned about the strathmore paper, I really like it, it is kind of a cross between HP and CP, much smoother surface than most CP, but has a nice texture that I like. I happen to like the "slickness" of it. But I guess thats why there are so many different papers out there, everyone likes something different.

I have yet to try the Arches brand but from what I hear about it I guess I should try it someday.

Thetech :wave:

GOwenStudios
10-24-2004, 03:07 AM
I voted cold press. That is my favorite to paint on although I have painted on all surfaces. Hot press will give you more detail and yet you can get a looser style on it as well.

Londondeon
10-25-2004, 06:38 PM
I am a textured clayboard fan. Manufactured by Ampersand in Texas. It is clay surface on masonite. Incredibly forgiving. May be taken to the sink and almost everything washed off if you are not happy with it. It can be scrubbed and scraped like scratchboard. The colors are more vibrant, and the surface is a little rougher than cold press paper. It does get blossoms or edges like hot press paper. It can be framed like an oil and doesn't need a mat or glass when it is sealed properly. It is nice and durable too. I use a UV resistant varnish over the paint and the painting is washable so it can be hung in the kitchen if you like. The uv varnish helps keep the colors vibrant too.
Londondeon

sarahw
01-10-2005, 11:00 AM
My paper of choice is Arches 140 lb Cold Press. It has enough texture to help along the granulation effects of some of my paints, but not so much that it interferes with the level of detail.

Painting on different papers, whether from different manufacturers or just different textures, is just like learning to paint all over again. :)

Sarah

paintchristina
07-03-2005, 02:46 PM
I would like to try Kilamanjaro. Where can I get it?

TMinNC
08-20-2005, 08:06 PM
Very useful thread:) ! I am so new to WC that my first attempt may still be wet! I was using Strathmore 140 pd. CP at first and then tried their sampler (Rough, CP, HP-all 140 pd. and Aquarius 80 pd. CP). I was having trouble getting the results I wanted but thought it was because of (lack of)experience.

I spent a little more $ and bought some Arches 140 pd. CP and HP blocks b/c they were on sale (JerrysArtarama in Raleigh). I really noticed a difference:). My sky didn't look like it was painted in the dark!

I did notice some lifting, as mentioned by some of you, when I wet the paper (no smell though). It seemed that the CP lifted more than the HP (should it?).

Thanks to all for their input/advice!

FriendCarol
08-24-2005, 02:54 PM
I believe Kilamanjaro is Cheap Joe's house-brand paper, so the simplest way to get it is from Cheap Joe's Art Supply (http://cheapjoes.com should take you there, and cjas.com also worked last I knew, plus some others :D ).

I used to use Curry's 200# paper, but they won't ship to U.S.A. anymore, so I've tried some full sheet Arches 140# paper someone sent me, as well as recently a quarter-sheet of Arches 300#. Used to use the Arches blocks, but they didn't work well for me when I switched from gouache to 'transparent w/c.'

I'm not happy with Arches 140# paper; doesn't hold the moisture long enough to please me for wet-in-wet work. But it is good for a simple still life or portrait; then again, even extremely cheap Canson 90# paper works for that, for me!

For my abstract work, I definitely like the HP surface, and perhaps the 300# Arches HP will be my new 'regular' paper. Someday I want to work larger, however, and full sheet is the largest format for 300# Arches HP; no rolls. So, I'm keeping my ears open. One of these days (after I move, presumably) I may try Steven Kinsella (recommended in another thread as source of paper, by Nick).

I want HP surface, I want heavy, and I want roll or large. That does not compute. :(

Jane Freeman
03-17-2006, 10:33 AM
I use CP 300# now because of time constraints and I can get by without stretching it...it just makes things go faster for me but I do miss a nice stretched piece of 140# arches...with the sizing removed with a long soak it becomes so velvety and it just behaves so well...but time marches on and I am settling for the 300...ARches is all I use.

bbbbgirl
03-17-2006, 12:11 PM
I almost always use HP, sheets or blocks. I even have a whole roll of Arches 140#HP!! But my prefered weight is 300#. I've only ever used Arches.....gotta try some other stuff too......hmmmm, maybe some Yupo if I'm feeling adventurous.

Alyssa

padagenhart
03-17-2006, 03:44 PM
I use CP 300# now because of time constraints and I can get by without stretching it...it just makes things go faster for me but I do miss a nice stretched piece of 140# arches...with the sizing removed with a long soak it becomes so velvety and it just behaves so well...but time marches on and I am settling for the 300...ARches is all I use.

Oh Jane, I am so happy to see you on here...we have emailed a couple of times - you may not recall, but it was about FM...and I have to admit your my watercolor idol!!!

As far as paper, I have fallen in love with Waterford 200#. It's pretty reasonable and only available through cheap joe's

Jane Freeman
03-17-2006, 04:33 PM
Thank you Angie for your kind words! It will take me awhile to adjust to everything here but when I have time I try to read a few. I do know a few people here...so I will get use to it I am sure...just rather computer illiterate so pretty basic here! HA!

ewin
03-31-2006, 03:50 PM
I live and die by arches hot pressed paper. I usually buy 140 lb, but recently invested in some 300 lb. It has a rougher surface than the 140 lb paper, but still works well for me.

artdreamer1
06-14-2006, 07:16 PM
Could have sworn I posted on this thread...I think I voted for CP (at the time that I voted). Since then, I've tried other papers/textures...it really depends on what I'm painting or the effect I'm after. I still usually use CP but really like Rough and Hot Press alot. As far as brands, I really haven't tried a whole lot; use Arches the most. I've tried Lanaquaelle, Strathmore, and Illustration board(think it was Strathmore brand)also.

Most often, I use 140 lb. but am leaning toward using heavier paper as much as possible now(preferably 300 lb)--it's FANTASTIC!!!!!! Really withstands a lot of abuse and wetness and boy, do I need that! What I most interested in trying lately is Textured Clayboard and Yupo--maybe I'll get some for my b-day later this summer (hope).

Michele

Jane Freeman
06-14-2006, 07:30 PM
Yupo is very interesting stuff and takes a special hand to do but can have wonderful results. I have tried it a couple of times but keep going back to arches 300#CP. I have a bunch of the watercolor canvas here too but have not had the time to really give it an honest try. Maybe that will be my winter project!

artist007
06-28-2006, 12:32 AM
I've tried Arches 140# cold pressed, Arches 300#, no. 112,114,and 115 Strathmore cold pressed Watercolor Board, and Illustration board.

Different papers will give you different results - Illustration and watercolor boards give you a hard edge while most wc papers give you a soft edge. I used to use nothing but no.114 Strathmore Watercolor board ( which is hard to find these days and expensive ) for 3 reasons -
1. You don't have to stretch it.
2. It takes masket as well as masking tape very well when it comes to more detail work and hard edges.
3. It's easier to frame than paper - it already has it's own backing board.

I found that Arches 300 # paper acts like a spunge - it soaks up your paint so you have to compensate for this by painting darker than you would on lighter papers. The positive side of this paper is that it'll takes a lot of lifting, scraping, etc., and it it works well with wet-in-wet technique - you also don't have to stretch it.

Graphic designers and illustrators like Illustration board because you can do very detailed work on this surface and it's surface will take many mediums.

Lately I have been using Strathmore 140# cold pressed paper in a 11 x15" pad form - this size is good for teaching and with a mat it will go in a 16x20" ready-made frame. I still miss painting on Starathmore 114# wc board, though and am considering buying some more if I find it at a good price.

Keep them brushes a smokin'
John
www.johnhelmsgallery.com

Jane Freeman
06-28-2006, 08:50 AM
John, You are so right about it being thirsty but I like the fact that the 300# will lay fairly flat through the process and not need to be stretched...speeds things up for me. I have heard some are attaching 140# with staples all around and not wetting it and having very good success...I guess that would be worth a try. I do not use the boards etc as I compete so therefore to comply with regulations I just paint this way in case I produce something good...it would be a shame I could not use it in a juried show. If I were not doing that, I would be more eager to try some other methods I think.

artist007
06-28-2006, 11:29 AM
Jane,

<<I have heard some are attaching 140# with staples all around and not wetting it and having very good success...I guess that would be worth a try.>>

I saturated my paper first and stretch it with staples all around and allow it to dry overnight - I usually do 2 or more at the same time because of the time factor. After it dries, I take the staples out and tape it down so my brush won't hit the staples when I'm painting.

<<I do not use the boards etc as I compete so therefore to comply with regulations I just paint this way in case I produce something good...it would be a shame I could not use it in a juried show.>>

Why won't they let you use wc boards?

John:)
Keep them brushes a smokin'
www.johnhelmsgallery.com (http://www.johnhelmsgallery.com)

artist007
06-28-2006, 11:46 AM
Jane,
I just visited your web site - you do very nice work! I'd be honored to swap artist links with you.

John
keep them brushes a smokin'
www.johnhelmsgallery.com

Jane Freeman
06-28-2006, 02:10 PM
I stretched for years and now with time constraints I don't...so am well aware of doing that...there is also a neat devise you can view at www.watercolorboards.com which I have tried and it works slick. I just need to be able to pull out the paper and begin now so it is just where I am in life I guess. There are rules for National shows and I am not sure how they feel about watercolor board but it would be good to inquire...most prospectuses will define the rules of each show.
At this time I am not putting up any new links and might have to remove the old ones I offer until I hear from North Light on what I do. I am now under contract and so will wait to see what they require. I am about 2 months out from finishing a book so am looking forward to finally having that under my belt. J

artist007
06-29-2006, 01:07 PM
Thanks for the watercolorboars link- I'll check it out.

<<At this time I am not putting up any new links and might have to remove the old ones I offer until I hear from North Light on what I do. I am now under contract and so will wait to see what they require. I am about 2 months out from finishing a book so am looking forward to finally having that under my belt.>>

CONGRADULATIONS - YOU GO GIRL !
John
www.johnhelmsgallery.com

Ian Bruce
09-04-2006, 06:02 PM
I started on 140lb cold-pressed, like most people. I do like to stretch my paper and don't find it other than quick and easy. I use Arches, bought as sheets, and Fabriano Artistico--which seems a little better for out-and-out, totally-soaked paper wet-in-wet. I have found that the Arches blocks that I bought for plein-aire vary in texture according to size of block. I was annoyed by the rough texture of the larger block--probably fine if you are expecting it and doing a work that benefits from the rougher texture. I bought a small pad of hot-pressed some time ago and really took to it and bought more! If you want to do detail, it is great, and if you want sloppy washes, blooms, runs and brushy texture it will do that too. The colors on hot-pressed are definitely more luminous in my (brief) experience--but others say so too. I also have less trouble with muddy darks. I think that this is because it seems to discourage over-working. Nice for loose portrait work. Also good for pen and ink and washes. Works well with charcoal pencil and wash as well. Still, cold-pressed seems to very much have the edge in various wet-in-wet techniques and granulation effects.

Valri Ary
10-08-2006, 01:31 AM
I voted hot press BUT I paint on all of the mentioned papers. Rough being my least favorite. I like HOT press most of all. I seem to have more of cold than anything tho.
I've been attaching my wc paintings to canvas so the HP is a real chore to deal with and the CP seems to attach better with less issues.

Jane Freeman
10-11-2006, 07:44 AM
Someone asked why I do not use boards...like illustration boards etc and a good one to try is multimedia board...if you compete in contests you must paint on paper and some of those are not all paper and many are not completely archival...so I just sort of stick to what I know will work.
When I said stapling all around...this was on dry. John, you are stretching the paper which is what I would always do with 140# but what these artists have been doing is mounting it dry on a board and then stapling so each staple meets or touches all the way around and say they are not having to stretch at all. Eliminating the water process would surely speed things up but I think I would be nerveous doing a good painting on this and then discovering it was not working for me and having to take it off and try to actually stretch it with watercolor on it...could be a mess! So I never chance it to try but even James Toogood works this way. I believe if you did not do alot of glazing it might work. Hope that cleared up some of what I was trying to get across.

mhimeswc
10-14-2006, 10:54 AM
I voted cold press, but that's not entirely accurate. I'd say about 90% of my paintings are on Arches cold press, but I like to play around with Fabriano hot press occasionally for flowers, and have also used Masa, Yupo and gessoed surfaces occasionally. And in an outdoor workshop last summer I found that I really like Arches rough for landscapes.

Michelle

shutzen
10-25-2006, 03:16 PM
shutzen here, and I am a newby . Question please. Has anyone tried dick blicks watercolor paper? I haven't painted in ten years due to some health problems, and am just starting again. I seem to be burning up alot of paper and want to know about this paper cause its cheap! can you guys please help? thanks: shutzen

Jane Freeman
10-25-2006, 03:39 PM
I worry that anytime it is cheap it will not give you good results. I have had some cheap papers come through when I teach and they simply cannot do a nice wash no matter how hard they try...it just gives a mottled effect. So I am not sure but if you had a number of people who wanted to try it...then you are not out alot but I just get Arches cold press now as I just do not want to start something l like and then hate the results due to the paper quality.

artinwc
11-01-2006, 07:48 PM
I'm so glad I peeped into this forum and saw a friend from previous forums. Jane, how are you! I'm guessing you're pretty close to being finished with your book now. I can't wait for it to come out!

I'm enjoying Jack Richeson paper a lot, as well as Saunders Waterford; but I guess I'm kinda fickle and haven't found one single paper that I like so much I would want to give up the others. I do mostly use 300# CP, unless I decide beforehand that I'm going to want to varnish the watercolor. Then I get my hubby to dry mount the paper on gessoed board. That is a REAL pleasure to paint on. However, it does take prior planning and preparation, and sometimes my muse visits and I just have to grab a sheet of paper and paint.

Great to see so many familiar faces here!

Judith