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NeilUnreal
05-06-2003, 09:21 PM
Over the last couple of days, I did some studies in rendering reflections in gouache (Holbein and W&N). All of them represent drops of liquid, except the upper left study, which is a self-portrait in a ball-bearing. In real life, all the studies are about half as large as they appear on the monitor.

Gouache is fun!

-Neil

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-May-2003/21528-Reflections.JPG

CharM
05-06-2003, 09:29 PM
In a word... WOW!

pampe
05-06-2003, 09:51 PM
great work

do you always work in gouache?

sweetbabydill
05-06-2003, 11:18 PM
Fantastic!!

artmom
05-06-2003, 11:31 PM
WOW! WOW! WOW!

Lyn

PMurphy42
05-06-2003, 11:34 PM
These are great!!! I love the ones running down.

patti

surreal
05-06-2003, 11:57 PM
Beautiful studies!

mhimeswc
05-07-2003, 12:27 AM
Wow! They really look wet. How did you do that?

Michelle

Sher
05-07-2003, 02:13 AM
Interesting......I was thinking about doing a study like yours. I only hope that mine turn out as realistic as yours!

ripvanblair
05-07-2003, 03:33 AM
Fantastic concept, great rendition------well done----------Alan

Phillip
05-07-2003, 04:18 AM
WOW!

Those reflections look real.

NeilUnreal
05-07-2003, 12:02 PM
Thanks all.

I've only just started working with gouache. I was impressed by some of the work I saw in gouache, particularly in combination with airbrushing and other media. I also wanted something that was water-workable, but more re-workable than transparent watercolor or acrylic. I've found that both are true -- gouache mixes well with airbrush, watercolor, and watercolor pencils, and it combines the speed of drying of acrylic with the re-workability of oil.

This being said, there are a few cautions: First, the finished painting is much more physically fragile than for any other medium I've tried; I'm not sure how to solve this. Second, the working characteristics are quirky -- halfway between tempra and watercolor -- it's easy to unintentionally "scrub" previously painted areas. Third, like most fine media, the working characteristics can vary from color to color. And fourth, it's tricky to work in extreme detail because the transition from too wet to too dry on the brush is only a matter of seconds (I'm going to experiment with extenders)*.

I'm really interested in getting people to try this medium; I feel it's been somewhat neglected outside of art and design schools. The approach I took was to start with a couple of small tubes of black and white** and do some grisaille. I was immediately hooked!

(Now if I could just do a whole painting. :p )

-Neil

*I may try acrylic over gouache for the tiniest details. Gouache over acrylic is bad, since the acrylic is more flexible than the gouache and provides no adhesion, but the reverse may be OK.

**W&N Permanent White has excellent re-workability.

Joni St. Martin
05-07-2003, 01:35 PM
Neil,

Very nice work. You have captured the reflections beautifully. I look forward to seeing more of your work!

Regards,

Joni

els
05-07-2003, 01:55 PM
Beautiful studies...