PDA

View Full Version : In a rut


Kate Church
04-29-2003, 02:01 PM
When I'm in a rut, or can't seem to think of anything to paint or draw, I go to my other love- the theater. I pick a play and read it from a purely aesthetic point of view, and then try to paint not the set, or costumes, or actors, but the characters themselves . I find that I learn a lot about my own feelings when trying to paint a person not as a physical body but as a personality and spirit. I was wondering what others do when stuck for subject or bored.

Kate
P.S. I just did an abstract portrait of Alma Winemiller, from Tennessee Williams' Summer and Smoke. A proper outside, with passion and hurt boiling underneath. Disturbing, really.

Ron van den Boogaard
04-29-2003, 04:42 PM
build and prep canvasses, the subject will come by itself after two layers of mowilithe, 6 layers of gesso and two titanium white

artcreator
05-02-2003, 03:09 AM
Like Rob, I somewhat plan and build up materials for my next creative outburst...it's only a matter of time before it comes. Sometimes thinking without doing is a good thing for me, it allows me to flesh out an idea or to really think about what I want to try next.

Morganna
05-02-2003, 09:18 AM
Im not very good at ruts. LOL I was going to ask the same thing not to long ago, but I chickened out. Im finally getting my nerve back on the net. But all must be forewarned that once I get it back it is really hard to shut me up.

My last rut took forever by the way. So maybe my methods are not the best. but these are the things I do.

Wetcanvas is one of them. I bounce back and forth to many forums looking at others work. For some this hurts, but me I love looking at the work on here and in a rut I think "hey they are still painting/drawing why don't you get back to work" I find it fun to see others work evolve as they practice too. I dig in my sketch books to see how far i've come. And sometimes an idea just hits me.

Another one I love to do is read all of my art books again, or get more at the library. Some i've read more than four times. This gives me the feeling that im learning something and takes the guilt out of the rut. It sometimes even kills the rut.

And then I just do it. When there are no ideas I sketch anything. My foot, My feet in the bath tub. (I know that last one sounded creepy LOL) , just a cup, a pack of cigarettes, a can of soda, a coffee bean. Well, yall get the idea. This kind of thing is scattered here and there in my sketch books. If it is really silly I put little notes along side of them. Like the can of hair spray became....fart spray! OK sorry. HEHHEH. Its true though. Sketching really keeps me on my toes.

But the worst rut of all is when you feel so feeble minded and can't seem to draw or paint a single thing. Where last week you had drawn something that made you say WOW, and this week you can't seem to get it together. Those are the one's that stop me in my tracks.

savage om
05-03-2003, 11:31 AM
Hi. I'm new to the board, and noticed this thread about being in a rut. I would like to share my current experience to see if anyone could give me any suggestions about getting out of my own.

I haven't been able to devote any energy to art for the past 5 years. I feel like I'm spending all of my time working/paying bills/ buying things, and am unable to muster the motivation.
Prior to five years ago, one of the factors that kept me painting was the fact that I was less mature, and things like my own well being/money were less important. At that time, i would spend what little money I made on booze (mainly), and scrape a few extra dollars here and there for art supplies, food, and rent\bills. I worked at whatever job I could find- many of which were worthless 'fire me- who cares" jobs- so there was more autonanamy. There was also the fact that I was around more artists who seemed to be doing the same thing. In a way, it was all very catalytic.
Of course, being unstable got old. It's ~5 years later. I'm 29. A thing in the back of my mind says "shouldn't you be creating something?" I now live in a really nice house with really nice neighborhood, kitchen full of food, new clothing/belongings/computers/etc, a routine schedule, bills being paid, credit, long term relationship, and paintings on the walls that are 5 years old or more ... :confused:
Seems like I should be painting even more now that I'm in this cozy environment, but every time I say 'today I paint', I end up looking at the empty canvas for about 15 minutes, and evenually walking into the living room, and watching TV.

Cathy Morgan
05-03-2003, 04:00 PM
I know where you're coming from. And it can be so hard to break habits of how an evening is spent. I think it's partly because we're usually tired by then, so all the resolutions and plans are easily dropped in favor of what's easy and habitual. My first response to what you wrote was to say "get rid of the TV!" but I tend toward drastic solutions.

Invite someone else over to paint with you? Do you still know any artists? Robert Genn (http://www.painterskeys.com/) recently suggested doing it by phone. One artist calls another and the two of you agree: "OK, I'm starting right now! I'll paint for two hours." Then you call again at the end of the two hours. This gives you privacy to work, but companionship and support too.

Another idea is to use some of your money to hire a creativity coach. Eric Maisel (http://www.ericmaisel.com) trains them and can probably recommend one in your area. It can even be done by email or phone. I'm a "practice client" for one of his coaching students, and my coach actually calls me from New Zealand once a week.

Cindy Aspden
05-03-2003, 05:42 PM
My ruts usually result from some kind of fear that I choose - yep, choose - not to face up to. Much of the time, it's my inhibiting perfectionism that won't allow me to do badly, so I don't do anything at all. Rather than face it and move on(as I hate and fight change) I remain comfortable and miserable in the fear. I am learning how to move out of this though. Unfortunately, I am a slow and stubborn learner.

Some things I have done, that have helped me immensely are re-establishing my goals and then priorities that go along with them. And of utmost importance is acknowledging what my heart is crying out to do, and that is create, and then allowing myself to do it because I am worth it. I must allow myself to do a bad painting - I must just paint!

Right now, I am in an intellectual rut. I have been drawing and studying like crazy, but to pick up my brushes and paint again before I have a good knowledge base of color theory is not permissible in my world. Yikes! I am tough on me. However, I believe it is my way of learning and my learning curve that causes me to work this way. I just have to be wary that its not the perfectionism that is ruling again.

cindy

Morganna
05-04-2003, 11:43 AM
I find that drawing will help the painting, so when there is no money for new paint or what ever else has been stopping me; I remind myself that the drawing will help me better understand things on a black and white level. Or with color if I use water colors or pastel pencils to draw with. Also drawing and sketching helps you practice proportion. So you don't spend as long a time drawing on the canvas as you do painting on it. That had always drove me nuts. So don't feel guilty if your drawing or sketching because your still creating.

savage om
05-04-2003, 05:10 PM
Originally posted by Cathy Morgan
I know where you're coming from. And it can be so hard to break habits of how an evening is spent. I think it's partly because we're usually tired by then, so all the resolutions and plans are easily dropped in favor of what's easy and habitual. My first response to what you wrote was to say "get rid of the TV!" but I tend toward drastic solutions.

You know-- that thought crossed my mind- basicly eliminate distractions (IE- computer games, TV, etc).
I have a love for TV (IE- discovery channels, history channels, movie channels, etc).
I imagine due to the withdrawl, I would probably begin to create, then arbitrarliy fall to the grund mid-brush stroke foaming he the mouth and convulsing due to a lack of alternate input as I was working.
Although, your pinpointing the TV as a possible antiproductivity handycap has given me an idea...
Maybe I should rearrange the living to to acomodate the vice. I could stick it in a corner of the room at an angle in the same room as the eisel (move the eisel to the living room). That way, I could work on the painting, and take an occasional eye rest by simply turning my head.

I'll try the links you posted, and se if thaat reignites the spark. Thanks for the information.

erik_satie_rolls
05-20-2003, 04:54 PM
Kate and om,

Its so easy to give advice when you are out of the rut, so hard to take when in it. I had inspiration 2 times in the last 14 years. Then my kids moved on to college last year and I've been inspired since. This sounds humorous, but somethings have to come in their own time.

During that 14 years I had a sketchbook, once in awhile I pulled it out and did drawings and made plans. Some of the worst art I ever did is in that sketchbook.

Someone once told me that when its time to make art, if you've gained the skill, it will be there when the time comes. That's proved true for me.

It's human and especially modern day human to want what we want right NOW. But that's not the way the good things come. (Personally I think people are in such a hurry because they have a mortal fear of the finality of death.)

Enjoy whatever you do have in your life right now. For me it was kids. The need to create the art will come in its own time, and you won't be able to buy enough materials to keep up with the energy.

good luck waiting,

dan

Morganna
05-21-2003, 10:19 AM
Ruts are kinda funny how they work. I experience a good rut once a month and have to pull out of it. But, it seems every time a buy a new piece of art supply I feel compelled to play with it.

I did just that, because ironicly enough I got into a rut after replying to the rut thing. I also joined up on one of the art projects on this site, even though im having one of those feeble minded months. talk about adding the pressure to yourself :) LOL.

Shai
05-21-2003, 09:17 PM
Originally posted by Kate Church
[B]When I'm in a rut, or can't seem to think of anything to paint or draw, I go to my other love- the theater. I was wondering what others do when stuck for subject or bored.

I do something similar to what you do - just do other things. It doesn't matter what... I love to read, write, watch movies/theatre/TV, make crafts... I know that eventually, my need to paint will be overwhelming enough.

If I'm in a rut for too long (this happens when I stop painting/sketching/drawing) for some time due to travel or something... I just go to my art studio anyway and work. At this time, I can't afford not to work for too long, as it is my only means of earning right now. That thought often helps me get out of a rut. :D

beauty
05-23-2003, 03:10 PM
I used to feel like being in a rut was a bad thing..but I've had to change my way of thinking because ruts are too damn depressing!

I wonder why we are are so hard on ourselves when it comes to being in the mood to create? In general, we don't do that with other areas in our life. I think the motivation and desire to create something should come naturally and not forced. Personally, I have to look at it that way or I'll go crazy with beating myself up over my down time.

I don't know about anyone else, but I can really get caught up in art ..to a point when I don't want to do anything else but create. That is just as bad as being in that rut..because I neglet other joys in life when I'm in that art-sy zone.

My advice is this..
Draw when you want to draw.. paint when you want to paint...eat chocolate whenever you crave it.. laugh whenever possible.. and sleep in whenever you can..
Life is way too short to worry about what you're NOT doing :)

Morganna
05-24-2003, 09:24 AM
:) I've been working on the letting myself have chocolate, beauty. :D I promised myself that when I can eat no more than two chocolates a day or one, ill buy myself one of those big boxes of Whitman samplers, and then turn it into a shrine for my pencils. :evil:

But seriously. You hit the nail on the head with that thought. We gotta stop beating ourselves up about this and say "hey, im supposed to be having fun, so what if I don't feel like it right this minute" Although easier said than done when I treat it like an obsession and a religious belief. But than again I work better with my head clear, and I work better when the mood just hit me, and not when I've started because I felt like i've been neglecting some poor little child.

Im going to have to say that was a most helpful post, Beauty.

beauty
05-24-2003, 11:31 AM
I'm extremely touched that I was able to help a little.. I feel like I take so much from reading what others say on this site an contribute very little..but I'm working on that!!:D

gillyvu
05-25-2003, 02:58 PM
It's ironic because I was just about to post the same thing, well i'm in a rut. It's only been two weeks but considering I do a painting or two a month, and go through a sketchbook once a month it is pretty long.
I usually surf the net, looking at thousands of pictures, hoping one will somehow inspire me, or read books, look at picture books, listen to music, watch movies, try to sit and just draw. Watch hockey, doing small gesture drawings, go to elfwood, go outside, and everything but art...or schoolwork. I have yet to be inspired but it will come! In the mean time, I continue my search for inspiration and do school work... well just a bit. I hope I could help!:)

paintergirl
05-27-2003, 08:39 AM
When I am in a rut artistically, I tend to work on the business side of art - webpages, design a new template for a brochure etc, business cards etc. Those are things I don't like to work on when I am feeling inspired anyhow, so ruts serve me well for that.
I have done most of my self-taught computer education , web design education during ruts, saves me alot of money in fees and gives me a chance to focus on something else other then the frustration I feel for being in a rut in the first place! ;)

I am still able to work towards my goal in the long term, but am channeling the energy into another area of that goal .

I agree with Beauty that rut's are not always bad. Sometimes life or circumstances will demand we have to tend to other things, but a breather also allows the creative juices to regenerate.

Morganna
05-27-2003, 08:59 AM
I heard that, paintergirl. Im always thinking about it too :)

Things are defiantly going to go hay wire around here soon with a move about to happen at the end of July. And of course the prep to move in July is going to be a living hell. LOL that will be the rut to end all ruts. And I bet I won't be in a rut when I have to do those chores. The good news is, is that if I don't get my own art room, Im going to steel the dinning room or something as my art area! :evil: I will have my own spot dag nabit! Muh hahhah muh ahahah.


LOL, I posted right before you edited your post, paintergirl. Just in case no one knows what the heck I mean by my first line. :) for a second there you got me thinking that I was finally losing my mind. LOL made my day though.

paintergirl
05-27-2003, 09:30 AM
Sorry about that Morganna...LOL
For the record, I had typed " Us art types always have art on our brains 24/7 anyhow..." ( whether or not we have the time or means to create )


I can relate to the moving Morganna, my husband is in a career that requires us to move every 3-4 years. My last rut was basically forced on me as he was called away for duty for 7 months overseas...trying to paint was next to impossible at times with kids and pets, job etc.
I just "stole" our dining room last month. Have ended sit-down formal dinners forever( at least at this address...LOL)
The family took a vote and we decided I needed the proper space and good light more then we needed a place for formal dining. So, the table got shoved into a corner , most other furniture was removed and replaced with my industrial 3 x4' drafting table and plenty of shelving. Not a very traditional dining room these days, but what the heck! I have never been happier either... Most friends have been happy to sit at the table in the corner and chat while I continue to work- they are even getting their own coffee now ( and mine , he he ...;)

pastelist
05-27-2003, 10:31 PM
The only suggestion I can make is to paint, paint, paint, paint.
Even if it takes signing up for an art class for a week or so.
When I experienced your problem, that is what I did.
The smell of turpentine and oil paint took care of my negative demons. Hope this helps.
:clap:

Morganna
05-30-2003, 10:49 AM
Yep, moving will kill ya. It does have its merits in that you always seem more organized in the new home for at least the next two months :) I moved out of my first apartment to move out of an apartment, then the guy that owned the home (even though he said "I have no plans on ever selling) sold his house so I moved after one year of living there RAHHHHHHHH! Lol. This apartment had gotten too expensive to live in ( I knew it would but could not convince my mom, who moved in with me, she fell in love with it and could not be convinced) so after two years we are moving again. :) Of course I call the shots this time I am after all paying the most rent. LOL I have full intentions of stealing that dinning room. But what I hate the most about moving is just what you said; Life stops, and seems as if every thing becomes about the move. :) its one of those things that if every thing is not done right the unpack problem becomes worse. Hey paintergirl, do you have boxes still in your closet that have yet to be unpacked? :D I do! lol When I can find something lo and behold there it is!

Our dinning room hardly gets used too. I thought about leaving the dinning room table but after reading your post im thinking of not putting it up at all. Because you just know someone is going to eat there or leave thier mail, or things on top of it. That is a major problem around here. not that people eat at the table but use it for every thing and leave every thing on it. I hate that. So you have inspired me to just do the heck away with it 100% :) and hopefully the new place will have an eat in kitchen. If it don't who cares too right? LOL Im mean. Cus now you got me thinking about saving up for some nice art furniture. Maybe this move will be exciting after all. :evil:

O'Connor
06-03-2003, 04:31 PM
ATT: Savage OM

At the risk of quoting Nike ads, "Just do it." You've obviously got enough interest in expressive art to be cruising forums on WC! Just put everything else aside and START something. Start small, baby steps I call them. You don't even have to have any intention of finishing anything. Doodle. Play. Experiment. Try what you've wanted to try but never did because you weren't confident of the outcome. We don't need confidence. We don't even need outcomes. It's about expression. Throw all caution to the wind, put everything else aside (especialLY..ECH! responsibilities) and jump right in. You're right about your freedom to paint being part of your age. Think of how children go through a day. They wake up without a plan and let adventure happen.

Cut loose, and let life happen to you!

paintergirl
06-05-2003, 11:26 AM
Originally posted by Morganna
Hey paintergirl, do you have boxes still in your closet that have yet to be unpacked? :D I do! lol When I can find something lo and behold there it is!


Yes...try as I might, I always end up with a couple boxes that I never get to! LOL
My strangest find was my flour sifter in a box of gardening implements out in my shed...didn't find that till 8 months after the initial move. I am not sure what the packers were thinking of when they did that!
I love the dining room studio and have enjoyed it so much since taking it over. Granted, it doesn't look traditional now, but who cares. It is me and my family that live here, not the visitors to my home! ;)

Morganna
06-11-2003, 09:32 AM
OK, sorry its been awhile :) been sick as an animal all weekend. There was this Frankinstien flew going around.

Im sooo glad someone can relate to the missing stuff in unpack box syndrome LOL I have shamefully more than a few of those :)

I've got to say you ought to write an artical over at the studio tips section on that dining room studio topic. Im sure lots of folk have the same blues of not knowing where to park their art problem. You know company dosn't come over that often here anyway.

And because the subject is rut....IM in one again LOL. It never fails. But this time Im taking beauty's advice and biding my time and ridding it out, and when im not working on the move playing IF fiction games :) an old, old, old passion.

JoyJoyJoy
06-12-2003, 09:33 AM
Well, I am almost 50 years old and have been painting/creating since I could hold a pencil... and I have had entire "rut" years... hahaha. But, I finally found one way to handle those uninspired, often frustrating times... to make then more easy to bear and also to get me enthusiastically perking with ideas again... so I will pass it along, with hope that it helps someone.

Being creative is work... it uses energy, not only the physical energy of actual production, but the mental energy of coming up with ideas. I think that sometimes we just get tired... and need to refuel.

When I am feeling uninspired and frustrated, I just call a "play day." I mean, I officially announce to my spouse and anyone else that I am having a "play day." I put on some "play clothes," which usually includes a silly hat, and just do things that are fun and refreshing to me. Sometimes, I just find a sunny corner and daydream... that really helps me recharge my batteries. I might flip read books on creativity or about other artists, or buy several art magazines with lots of photos of paintings (I am an oil painter). Sometimes I take my sketchbook and digital camera to the nearby public gardens to look at the roses, wander through the greenhouse, or walk through the Japanese garden. I might go to the art store and spend an hour picking out a brush and poking through all the materials I have never tried. A trip to the fabric store often gives me inspiration... I find a fabric that has a wonderful color combination, buy a small piece, then go home and experiment with painting several subjects (from my photo reference collection) in that color combination.

I have found that when I chose to spend my time with the TV or a computer game, my whole day slips away... and I feel even worse. Having an official "play day"... or several in a row... gives me time to relax, makes me feel good, and gets me painting again.

Hope this idea helps. Nance

O'Connor
06-12-2003, 10:07 AM
Nance:

Great post regarding "play day".
I greatly enjoy (or should I say "I'm into") a few computer games, and I like TV (usually classic movies or semi edu-artsy stuff) but I've never realized what you just said. In a way I enjoy them, yet in another I am left feeling like I "wasted" a chunk of time.
One of my mantras:

"Growing up is highly over-rated."

It's important for me to continually remind myself how to enjoy life as a child does, with a sense of wonder and adventure!

artgorillagal
06-12-2003, 10:09 AM
I'm in a rut right now! I'm in a "I have no ideas and I'm never going to get a new idea again, ever and do I want to put people into my paintings again or go abstract I don't know so I won't do any paintings oh no!" rut. I've always been in this rut and suddenly it passes with a new idea that gives birth to an entire series.

I handle my (oh too frequent) ruts by several means.

1. Drawing. I do hate drawing but unlike painting where I can pick up a brush and do a nice painting after a period of time, my drawings seem to revert back to how they looked in high school (and that's been a looooong time ago!). So I draw my foot or hand or husband on the couch with the remote or cat napping or garbage still-life). Usually it's nothing to shout about and only serves as a reminder that I need to do it more than I do but it is making art so I feed valid.

2. Shame. I tell myself that if a certain amount of time elapses without me making art, I won't tell anyone I'm an artist. I'll claim I'm a housewife or a _____(insert title you don't want to be known as). I also blackmail myself into it. I say if a certain period of time passes without making art, I will pick up the phone and invite _____(name obnoxious acquaintance or neighbor you avoid at all costs) to come over/go shopping/invade my life. These two work for me - usually.

3. Process. I read my myriad of art books that are lying around still in the protective wrappers. This does inspire me. Or I buy a new art book. Or, as someone mentioned, this is a good time for the business aspect like getting slides dupped, rewriting the artist's statement, seeking contacts, etc.

4. Another medium. I make assemblages when I'm in a rut. These are a valid art form but I consider myself primarily a painter. My assemblages are so incredibly different than my paintings and take an entirely different approach. No, I don't drag out the brushes or paint - I put vaseline on my husband's leg and then wrap plaster cast guaze all over and pour plaster into a shoe and decorate it. Or I put red velvet flocking on a gun. Bizarre or odd, but that's my assemblage and it couldn't be more different than painting and it sometimes provides a valid relief or break until I am able to approach painting again.

5. My sketchbook/journal. It does look a bit like Frida Kahlo's but her's is less psychotic than mine. I set a timer for 45 minutes and I begin writing. I write things like "You are never going to be an artist who are you kidding you never finish anything or stick to anything but I will write and do a few sketches for 45 minutes." and I do a few sketches and write things like "make red trees? how about metal trees with earthtone roots?" and pretty soon I not only have new sketches and ideas but also a record that I do refer to each time and sometimes the old sketches become a new painting.

6. Warning! I have several friends who are in a rut and can't make art. If you let this go on too long you lose your identity as an artist or the feeling of validity. My friends have been not making art 5-10 years and at some point you have to make art or accept that you will not. Sometimes, people go through a period of not-making art due to deaths, illness, financial crisis, marital/personal instability and as long as you are reading, thinking and writing about art this may simply be a "gestation" period for your art.

Sorry to be so long winded but I'm avoiding making my own art...

savage om
07-02-2003, 11:43 PM
Originally posted by O'Connor
ATT: Savage OM

At the risk of quoting Nike ads, "Just do it." You've obviously got enough interest in expressive art to be cruising forums on WC! Just put everything else aside and START something. Start small, baby steps I call them. You don't even have to have any intention of finishing anything. Doodle. Play. Experiment. Try what you've wanted to try but never did because you weren't confident of the outcome. We don't need confidence. We don't even need outcomes. It's about expression. Throw all caution to the wind, put everything else aside (especialLY..ECH! responsibilities) and jump right in. You're right about your freedom to paint being part of your age. Think of how children go through a day. They wake up without a plan and let adventure happen.

Cut loose, and let life happen to you!


Thanks for the tips.
I've started small by doing animations, and computer graphics here and there. It's turning aout to be a terrific fix prior to getting an eisel.
http://bellsouthpwp.net/n/o/nocrops/frac5.gif

pastelist
07-03-2003, 07:11 AM
You have somw very good ideas. Ruts are all too common in creative people. I sometime think that this is the minds idea of a vacation or rest period. After the rut, we sometimes have created masterpieces. May your rut be short lived.

J.W.
07-03-2003, 01:45 PM
Hello,

One way i've found to deal with ruts is to find a way to evolve my work. Make it more challenging, different or fun.

When I first became serious :p about art I painted cars. Old cars with minimal backgrounds. This became boring, so the backgrounds slowly became more complex. Then I began adding people, setting scenes, asking, "What's the story? How do I draw the viewer into the piece?"

Most recently I've been moving sideways with my work. Classic cars mixed with scifi-fantasy themes. Adding humor. Wilder stories.

I also have a gargantuan amount of reference material, and if I hit a slow spot, I play solitaire. I go through drawings, notes, photos, magazine clippings, books, comics, cd covers, anything. I try to find stories, and draw the elements together from the chaos. Each story goes into a file folder to ferment awhile. Some stories evolve, some die, but there's always at least a dozen irons in the fire.

Other solutins abound. The main thing is to not allow boredom into the routine. Boredom is Death.

Matt

O'Connor
07-03-2003, 02:28 PM
;) Savage OM:

Glad to hear you're "doing it"!

:rolleyes:

Regards,

Rose Queen
07-03-2003, 04:03 PM
Can I also suggest that you cruise the Creativity Corner forum? There are a tons of rut-busting ideas in the "sticky" notes on artist's dates, etc.

We just completed the 12-week program set out in The Artist's Way (TAW) by Julia Morgan, but we will be starting another 12-week session online here at Wet Canvas in September, led by the inimitable paintfool! You can, of course, do TAW by yourself, but it seems like more fun and less work, plus you get a ton of support, if you do it in a group, either in person or online.

TAW's entire thrust is to break through artist's block and it seems to me that that's what ails a number of the posters in this thread. I can personally attest to its efficacy! Copies of the book are often available in second-hand bookstores, so it won't even cost you much!



100% free webcam site! (http://showmewebcam.com/?p=0) | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! (http://showmewebcam.com/?p=2) | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3 (http://showmewebcam.com/?p=4)



100% free webcam site! (http://showmewebcam.com/?p=0) | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! (http://showmewebcam.com/?p=2) | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3 (http://showmewebcam.com/?p=4)

DanaT
07-03-2003, 06:14 PM
Good suggestion, Rose.

And the book's in the library too. If you want to see what the last group experienced together, just check out the weekly threads in the Artists Way forum.

ps The author's name is Julia Cameron.

Rose Queen
07-03-2003, 06:27 PM
Originally posted by DanaT
ps The author's name is Julia Cameron.

Ack! :o Of course it is; Julia Morgan's the architect of Hearst Castle -- guess which reference library I've spent the morning in...? :rolleyes:



100% free webcam site! (http://showmewebcam.com/?p=0) | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! (http://showmewebcam.com/?p=2) | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3 (http://showmewebcam.com/?p=4)



100% free webcam site! (http://showmewebcam.com/?p=0) | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! (http://showmewebcam.com/?p=2) | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3 (http://showmewebcam.com/?p=4)

DanaT
07-03-2003, 08:16 PM
You mean Hearst Castle was designed by a woman? Kewl!

Rose Queen
07-03-2003, 09:18 PM
Not only that, but she was Mr. Hearst's personal architect, building the headquarters of the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner, a major Hearst newspaper. As a great friend of the YWCA, she also designed many YWCA buildings across the country (including...ahem, the one in Pasadena, CA!). :cat:



100% free webcam site! (http://showmewebcam.com/?p=0) | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! (http://showmewebcam.com/?p=2) | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3 (http://showmewebcam.com/?p=4)



100% free webcam site! (http://showmewebcam.com/?p=0) | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! (http://showmewebcam.com/?p=2) | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3 (http://showmewebcam.com/?p=4)