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rapolina
04-29-2003, 11:24 AM
I was wondering about the boundary between imagination and creativity..:confused:

what do you think about?

ciao, rapolina:cat: .

angecald
04-30-2003, 12:37 AM
What boundary would that be?

savage om
05-04-2003, 11:20 PM
It I were to answer this thread with a completely deconstructionist viewpoint, I would say that the polarities in question were redundant.
I'm having a hard time even translating what you're really asking using strict semantics.
the thread has peaked my interest though. Can rephrase the question?

erik_satie_rolls
05-20-2003, 04:43 PM
Well, I would say that boundary is both expanded and delimited by your attained skill and knowledge. My favorite piece of art is by one of my students done when she was 5 years old. So far I've taught her about negative shapes, composition, gestural drawing, colour theory, and scaling without totally ruining her.

I'm pretty sure she's a prodigy. She turned 6 last month.


I hope this fuels some discussion.

dan

beauty
05-23-2003, 03:15 PM
I think you have to have imagination to be creative..so instead of a boundary it is more of a footstep along the same path

But ..what the hell do I know, I draw naked people when I can't think of anything better :D

paintergirl
05-24-2003, 10:32 AM
I do not know about boundries, though I do believe imagination feeds into creativity and vice versa...

prairie painter
05-26-2003, 11:14 PM
Interesting discussion topic! I find that when I find the time to let my imagination take over (not often with kids around!) and I get totally caught up in my imagining, my creativity zings off in directions it never takes without my mind really getting into the creative zone. But I have a very altered brain from my strokes, so maybe it's easier for me to slide into this zone. Not that I've ever tried to paint from there, I usually do poetry.

Keith Russell
06-01-2003, 11:38 AM
rapolina, to understand what you mean by the boundary between 'imagination' and 'creativity', I would need to know how you define those two words; I need to know to what concepts your use of those words refer.

One can, of course, define those words in such a way that there is no boundary; that the two words refer to the exact same concepts.

Or, one can--of course--define them in such a way that they don't really refer to the same things at all, in which case there would be a clear boundary between them.

It's more of a semantics game, actually, than something more metaphysical.

K

dodger
06-05-2003, 02:01 PM
Yes, the two words have similar meanings, but differ according to one's semantics. To me, creativity is something we all possess as humans... it can mean a lot of things, but basically, it's finding new & unique ways of thinking & problem-solving.

Imagination, on the other hand, is the ability to visualize or perceive things beyond our reality. Children are more open to imagination, as they are not limited by the cynicism that we seem to gain, in varying degrees, by life experiences, reality.

mallory
06-05-2003, 05:04 PM
I like Dodger's defs. That is pretty much how I think about it. Using this approach it almost makes sense to think of creativity as "applied imagination". Where problems are solved or tasks accomplished in a way that is different than anything we have done before.

For a short piece by Moi distinguishing clever from creative see http://www.mikemallory.com/summit.htm

mallory

dodger
06-06-2003, 12:37 AM
Great essay, Mallory.. I enjoyed it. Thanks.

savage om
06-08-2003, 10:55 AM
Originally posted by dodger
Yes, the two words have similar meanings, but differ according to one's semantics. To me, creativity is something we all possess as humans... it can mean a lot of things, but basically, it's finding new & unique ways of thinking & problem-solving.

Imagination, on the other hand, is the ability to visualize or perceive things beyond our reality. Children are more open to imagination, as they are not limited by the cynicism that we seem to gain, in varying degrees, by life experiences, reality.

Ok- this seems to help a little bit :confused: . The operative context here would be 'engine for finding ways that are unique', and 'the ability to extrapolate from the unknown'.

O'Connor
06-08-2003, 05:11 PM
No way could I accept the definition of imagination as having to do with things beyond reality. When we prepare for a speech or an interview, we actively imagine the process, even go so far as imagine positive outcomes to improve our outlook and positive motivation.
I think imagination and creativity are very closely linked. In productively creative people, they can be nearly synonomous. You simply can't lay a brush to a canvas or a hand to a potter's wheel without some ability to imagine what your action will produce.
I think "creative" people, artists, etc., have a tendency to have a more productive imagination, or perhaps one that thinks in greater depth or detail. There certainly are people that seem to have little, if any imagination. I believe it's all related to that whole left-brain vs. right-brain thing.
Imagination is probably available to anyone, and in fact, probably a basic component of genetic instinct (as mentioned before in the example of being likely to reasonably foresee the outcome of an action).
Creativity, at least productive creativity, therefore, would be actually doing something with it.

dodger
06-09-2003, 01:40 AM
Well, I think it does come down to semantics. What you might term "imagination", I might call "visualization". I look at imagination as being more abstract than visualization. ;)

Yes.. there's a ton of research out there for right-brain, left-brain studies. Fascinating subject, isn't it?