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tess2000
05-17-2001, 04:54 AM
<IMG SRC="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-May-2001/apachebrave.jpg" border=0>

This is just a plain old pencil sketch I did a few years ago but I want to paint it in oils. Before I paint it I was just wondering if the face looks to feminine. It's suppose to be a male apache youth.

Also, Does anyone know of a way to transfer this to canvas without having to redraw it?

Thanks in Advance,
Tess

ArtyHelen
05-17-2001, 10:03 AM
I knew he was male right away, and wondered if he's doing anything tonight? http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/wink.gif http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/angel.gif

I love the peaceful look on his face, and those cheekbones! Will make a great painting, too. (Sorry I can't help with the transferring question!)

Helen


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cmorrow05
05-17-2001, 01:10 PM
He's definitely male, and I'm just sorry Helen saw him first. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/wink.gif

As to transferring this to canvas, isn't there graphite paper out there that you can put between this and the canvas and go over the outlines? I'm pretty sure there is, but my art store doesn't carry it. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/frown.gif

AHA! Just checked Dick Blick, this is what I'm talking about:
http://www.dickblick.com/itemgroups-t/transferpapers/

Hope this helps.

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Colleen
"I swear by my life and my love of it that I will never live for the sake of another man, nor ask another man to live for mine." -- John Galt, Atlas Shrugged

nnelson1
05-17-2001, 02:15 PM
Or you could make your own!

Just get a graphite stick and give a good coating to the back of your drawing. Then trace over the drawing to place the image on the new surface.

However, if you don't want to do that for fear of messing up the drawing, you could get ahold of an art projector (Most art supply stores have them) and use this to project the image onto the new surface.

You could also use the old graph technique.

By the way, I think the face is fine. Feminine/masculine/androgynous..looks good.

Nick

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Everyone knows the moon's made of cheese...

djstar
05-17-2001, 05:59 PM
Got a couple...
if you have a good printer and maybe some graphical editing program, print it on a couple of sheets of paper to the size you want. My corel photopaint has an option to TILE the piece. I print it in 4 panel just to the size I need.
THEN I trace the landmarks either on tracing paper to be sure
THEN I take a large piece of the tracing paper and do the graphite breakdown - a fat compressed charcoal or graphite stick and scribble the heck out of a full sheet, then with a cotton ball, I use ... in school we did lighterfluid, but nobody carries lighters so I used some very volitile lacquer thinner, but alcohol may do the same, and smear it quickly until there is an even surface. I think that holds it to the paper so ALL of the smudge doesn't fall off.
THEN I trace either the tracing or the orginal print out with a BLUE ballpoint. HATE to get done, move the piece and find I MISSED a big chunk.
That gives me the whole under drawing and it is up to me from there to make it a painting.

My only suggestion, and remember my pictures are notoriously gender confused for some reason, is soften up the brow line. It seems if it is so precise it implys plucking and the tiniest droop of the eyelid so the cleopatra line is not so suggestive will macho him up just fine.

Hope I help,
dj*

tess2000
05-19-2001, 02:27 PM
Thank you all for your suggestions. I should have added that I wanted it larger as well. I think I will try the DJStarr method and see if I can make that work. I checked out the prices of projectors and they cost as much as my easel! Have to hold off on that one for while.

Never thought of tileing it out that DJ. Thanks a ton for that info.

Tess

Shirl
05-19-2001, 02:36 PM
Now wer're talking to a turtle LOL!

I'm about to do a painting of a difficult small drawing. I'm going to use a copier to enlarge it, graphite the back of the copy, and then trace over it with result drawing on the canvas. Didn't damage the original at all.

Shirl